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Pen-Fi (FPs, RBs, BPs, etc...) [56k Warning] - Page 119

post #1771 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Audius View Post

The rotring is on sale at massdrop.com for $36 or something like that, I believe.

Edit : $29.67 + $2 shipping usa

It retails on amazon UK for $31 + free shipping.


Edited by Tangster - 3/20/13 at 5:57am
post #1772 of 2557
Show and tell.

This is a pen I turned on my lathe a couple of years back. It's a Jr. Statesman with rhodium and black titanium. The pen itself is a gemstone leopard jasper.



post #1773 of 2557

^ Very nice! Intereseting materials for sure. Isn't it too heavy?

Is that a rollerball or a ballpoint?

 

Since I began to use fountain pens, I really refuse to use ballpoints if I can.

post #1774 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by attika89 View Post

^ Very nice! Intereseting materials for sure. Isn't it too heavy?
Is that a rollerball or a ballpoint?

Since I began to use fountain pens, I really refuse to use ballpoints if I can.

It is definitely heavier than your average pen but it's got a nice weight to it, not too heavy, just enough to know you have a quality instrument in your hands :-) It is a rollerball, not a ballpoint.

Here's two more I have with me at work. Pardon the crappy pictures taken with a cell phone. I used to have a lot more but sold them all :-)



post #1775 of 2557

I too, have been swept away. If not in a hurry, I'll take the extra to retrieve one of my Pilot Metal Falcons... biggrin.gif 

post #1776 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by attika89 View Post
Since I began to use fountain pens, I really refuse to use ballpoints if I can.

+1. Is that the older 14k nib 149 in your avatar? I have the new version and quite like it, but there are always the purists who insist that 14k gold is the best material for a nib because it is less likely to be sprung than higher gold content materials.

post #1777 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by attika89 View Post
Since I began to use fountain pens, I really refuse to use ballpoints if I can.

+1. Is that the older 14k nib 149 in your avatar? I have the new version and quite like it, but there are always the purists who insist that 14k gold is the best material for a nib because it is less likely to be sprung than higher gold content materials.

 

+2

post #1778 of 2557

Figured this is a more appropriate place to post my most recent attempt at almost passable calligraphy. I really need some decent paper. 80gsm photocopy paper and cheapass notepaper isn't really helping.

 

 

post #1779 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tangster View Post

Figured this is a more appropriate place to post my most recent attempt at almost passable calligraphy. I really need some decent paper. 80gsm photocopy paper and cheapass notepaper isn't really helping.

 

 


Very nice, I would never hope to even get close to that level. On the paper side, Rhodia notepads are one sale at the moment at Ryman for buy 2 get 1 half price. They very nice for my note jotting, but not sure about calligraphy. Worth a try if there is a store at your area.

post #1780 of 2557
What pads should I get for drawing with a fountain pen? Also, for Calligraphy?
post #1781 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post

What pads should I get for drawing with a fountain pen? Also, for Calligraphy?


You know that you need a special pen for calligraphy, right? A normal fountain pen won't allow you to letter. You can get an italic tipped pen to do gothic and italic scripts like above, or a copperplate nib to do flexible, cursive style calligraphy. The copperplate version is considerably more difficult and takes more skill to do than the italic type of calligraphy. You can get fountain pens with italic nibs, but if you really want to get serious, you'll want to use a dip pen (these have sharper corners for more precision, but require you to dip the pen into an inkwell every few strokes). The dip pens are ideal for copperplate as well. Good news is that dip pens are much cheaper than fountain pens.

post #1782 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post

+1. Is that the older 14k nib 149 in your avatar? I have the new version and quite like it, but there are always the purists who insist that 14k gold is the best material for a nib because it is less likely to be sprung than higher gold content materials.


It's a 146 with a 14k B nib. I would say that I prefer 14k gold because it has some springiness and can rovide some line variation.

post #1783 of 2557

Actually you can make an 18k nib just as springy, it's just not advisable to do so because the nib is more likely to be damaged from bending. How do you like the bold nib? I find that the nibs on the bigger Montblancs tend to run very wide; a 146 B must be a firehose.

post #1784 of 2557

^ Yes it is very wet!  It can bring out some nice shading from my inks. I really like it, but I might send it to a nibmeister for a stub grind.

post #1785 of 2557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsujigiri View Post


You know that you need a special pen for calligraphy, right? A normal fountain pen won't allow you to letter. You can get an italic tipped pen to do gothic and italic scripts like above, or a copperplate nib to do flexible, cursive style calligraphy. The copperplate version is considerably more difficult and takes more skill to do than the italic type of calligraphy. You can get fountain pens with italic nibs, but if you really want to get serious, you'll want to use a dip pen (these have sharper corners for more precision, but require you to dip the pen into an inkwell every few strokes). The dip pens are ideal for copperplate as well. Good news is that dip pens are much cheaper than fountain pens.
So any pen recs?
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