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Shure SRH940 and Beats Pro Potential Driver Swap

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 

Let me preface this by saying how much I like to fix things. As such I have acquired two sets of functional, but broken headphones that apparently were inconvenient to their previous owners.

 

The first pair is a set of Shure SRH940s that have cracked at their hinge (an overwhelmingly common issue) that i've managed to sort of repair with some metal tape and some rubber bands, but the repair job, while it holds the headphones together, is not particularly adequate and could use some improvement.

 

The second pair is a set of Beats Pros in which both speakers still work, but the connection between the two has severed and requires a headphone splitter and two cables, but is otherwise functional (to the extent that the speakers in Beats headphones were ever functional to begin with)

 

As such I would like to see if I can replace the drivers in the Beats Pros with the significantly better Shure SRH940's drivers. The driver size of the Beats is 50mm and the driver size of the Shure is 40mm so I don't think there should be a problem, but I would appreciate any available insight before I go messing around with them. 

 

(And yes, I am reasonably experienced with a soldering iron)

post #2 of 46
Thread Starter 

^bump

post #3 of 46

Sounds fun. 

post #4 of 46
Thread Starter 

Yeah, hopefully I don't mess anything up too badly...

post #5 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeeesh View Post
 

Let me preface this by saying how much I like to fix things. As such I have acquired two sets of functional, but broken headphones that apparently were inconvenient to their previous owners.

 

The first pair is a set of Shure SRH940s that have cracked at their hinge (an overwhelmingly common issue) that i've managed to sort of repair with some metal tape and some rubber bands, but the repair job, while it holds the headphones together, is not particularly adequate and could use some improvement.

 

The second pair is a set of Beats Pros in which both speakers still work, but the connection between the two has severed and requires a headphone splitter and two cables, but is otherwise functional (to the extent that the speakers in Beats headphones were ever functional to begin with)

 

As such I would like to see if I can replace the drivers in the Beats Pros with the significantly better Shure SRH940's drivers. The driver size of the Beats is 50mm and the driver size of the Shure is 40mm so I don't think there should be a problem, but I would appreciate any available insight before I go messing around with them. 

 

(And yes, I am reasonably experienced with a soldering iron)

1. The Beats Pro's drivers are 40 mm, not 50 mm

2. You might as well fix the cable that runs through the headband. It's more convenient, and daisy chaining is fun!

post #6 of 46

I've mentioned it a few times before in other threads - Beats uses the same 40 mm drivers from the Solos through to the Pros

 


Edited by vantt1 - 6/1/14 at 10:17pm
post #7 of 46
Thread Starter 

Thanks. I can definitely attempt the replacement while I have them open. You'd think that they would use a better driver. That they use that same driver really says something about their business model...


Edited by Squeeesh - 6/2/14 at 12:49pm
post #8 of 46

Good enough to get pwned by apple to the tune of 3bilion dollars. 

post #9 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikongod View Post
 

Good enough to get pwned by apple to the tune of 3bilion dollars. 

Evidently. Who knows what'll happen now

post #10 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeeesh View Post
 

Thanks. I can definitely attempt the replacement while I have them open. You'd think that they would use a better driver. That they use that same driver really says something about their business model...

I don't think Beats has ever publicly marketed their driver size as a selling point, but only used buzzwords like "Titanium" and "Proprietary". 40 mm is all you need to blow an average consumer away.

post #11 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vantt1 View Post
 

I don't think Beats has ever publicly marketed their driver size as a selling point, but only used buzzwords like "Titanium" and "Proprietary". 40 mm is all you need to blow an average consumer away.

Sorry, I thought they used the same driver, as opposed to just the same size.

I looked at their website, they don't seem to advertise anything about their headphones except that they have a lot of base, some models are lighter, "Practically Indestructible", made for DJs, sleek, etc...

It's all very subjective and not very informative.


Edited by Squeeesh - 6/2/14 at 5:56pm
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeeesh View Post
 

Sorry, I thought they used the same driver, as opposed to just the same size.

I looked at their website, they don't seem to advertise anything about their headphones except that they have a lot of base, some models are lighter, "Practically Indestructible", made for DJs, sleek, etc...

It's all very subjective and not very informative.

It's very clever marketing if you ask me. Specifications only mislead a consumer who knows nothing about audio. Bigger driver size=better? More frequency range=better? From a technical standpoint, it may be true to some extent, but sound itself is very subjective.

 

Bose acknowledges this too - they also never put up frequency range (maybe only the typical 20-20,000 Hz) or driver size/technology. As long as it sounds "good" subjectively speaking, they've already won most of the market.

 

Remember, no matter what Beats says about "pro audio", their target market will always be those who know nothing but have a bit of money to spend.


Edited by vantt1 - 6/2/14 at 6:03pm
post #13 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by vantt1 View Post
 

It's very clever marketing if you ask me. Specifications only mislead a consumer who knows nothing about audio. Bigger driver size=better? More frequency range=better? From a technical standpoint, it may be true to some extent, but sound itself is very subjective.

 

Bose acknowledges this too - they also never put up frequency range (maybe only the typical 20-20,000 Hz) or driver size/technology. As long as it sounds "good" subjectively speaking, they've already won most of the market.

 

Remember, no matter what Beats says about "pro audio", their target market will always be those who know nothing but have a bit of money to spend.

True. There really is no "good" way to market headphones is there? So to those who don't research t's really a brand loyalty battle.


Edited by Squeeesh - 6/2/14 at 8:15pm
post #14 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squeeesh View Post
 

True. There really is no "good" way to market headphones is there? So to those who don't research t's really a brand loyalty battle.

Yep, it all boils down to the consumer's personal tastes, and also gaining as much visibility as possible. Beats piggybacks celebrities' fame through Dr. Dre's connections, and gains some major exposure through news, social media, product placement in music videos and movies etc. If consumers like a certain artist's music, and where Beats are found, is most of today's mainstream music, people will already acknowledge the existence of such a headphone, if not at least subconsciously.

post #15 of 46

@Squeeesh, do you know how to rewire the Pros through the headband?

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