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Long-haul Flight - IEMs or Closed Cans?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

I am looking to retire my ancient Shure E3c which has developed some left-right volume imbalance. I have generally enjoyed the E3c for most but found them a bit off putting when used on long-haul flight because discomfort usually develops 5-6 hours into the flight and running the cable behind my back is also tricky when seated.

 

So I would like you to share your thoughts on whether I should continue with IEMs regardless or perhaps getting some closed cans instead. Price would ideally be below £200 and I will be driving them through Fiio E07K from a mixture of phone/laptop/inflight entertainment.

post #2 of 6
If you are getting noise cancelling, get over-ears for regular reclining seats or in-ears for fold-flat seats. It doesn't have to be Bose either; other brands like Audio Technica and Sennheiser work as well. Just remember to get extended warranty plans for frequent trips.

Without noise cancelling, the Denon D600 isolate wonderfully, sound very close to loudspeakers (in home feeling), and are very comfortable, though some have complained about the size (earcups ~4.5" in diameter, no folding) and fit ( headband adjustment is pointless). Whatever is in parentheses is whatever I experienced demoing them and what others have agreed upon on-line.
Edited by pbui44 - 5/24/14 at 8:53am
post #3 of 6

check these graphs, they have at the bottom the overall noise isolation/reduction in decibels: http://www.innerfidelity.com/headphone-data-sheet-downloads

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your input.:smile:

Quote:
Originally Posted by pbui44 View Post

If you are getting noise cancelling, get over-ears for regular reclining seats or in-ears for fold-flat seats. It doesn't have to be Bose either; other brands like Audio Technica and Sennheiser work as well. Just remember to get extended warranty plans for frequent trips.

Without noise cancelling, the Denon D600 isolate wonderfully, sound very close to loudspeakers (in home feeling), and are very comfortable, though some have complained about the size (earcups ~4.5" in diameter, no folding) and fit ( headband adjustment is pointless). Whatever is in parentheses is whatever I experienced demoing them and what others have agreed upon on-line.

I forgot to say I prefer isolation to cancellation, so the D600 would be ideal. I have just discovered the ATH-M50x though and the way it folds looks less breakage-prone during transport. But would you say it is a step backwards in terms of SQ?

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcmc View Post

Thanks for your input.smile.gif
I forgot to say I prefer isolation to cancellation, so the D600 would be ideal. I have just discovered the ATH-M50x though and the way it folds looks less breakage-prone during transport. But would you say it is a step backwards in terms of SQ?

I have never heard the ATH-M50 (original, s, or x), despite seeing them on at least three people, but they were all patients or hospital visitors and I did not want to bother remembering all of the gross stuff I have seen on medical equipment. wink.gif I would think that the SQ would not be too much a step back to outweigh the portability, but I did have an srh-840 (similar sound to the ath-m50) and though it sounded very balanced, it was just too boring, so I gave it to my church. I think the D600 has a carbiner to snap on the carrying bag, so it does not have to be cramped in a carry-on, just hooked on a carry-on.
post #6 of 6
I just got my Denon D400 and man, I am pretty much happy. I wanted D600s, but no one wanted to give their cans up, so I went with the lower model. Here are the Pros and Cons (with D600 compare):

Pros (8): regular adjustable headband (D600s fit my head almost perfectly, just a little loose on the smallest setting); snug, but not too snug earpads (D600 were too roomy around-ear and not deep enough inside); smaller earcups for less clunky fit (D600 earcup sides stayed parallel; sux for uneven sides); Earpads contoured head like a pillow after being used to ear-and-head fitting (D600 earpads fitted earcups more than your head, making two earcup bowls on one bowl headband fit); one small cable connector (D600 cable had large connectors on both sides); deeper bass with semi-lush mids and part-sparkly highs IN PASSIVE MODE (my HE-4 makes up for D600 spacious sound improvement); smaller frame (still not foldable, like D600); a great value (D600 is only a better value to the D7100)

Cons (5): earcup plate knobs for built-in amplifier and remote (D600 looked less ridiculous by ears facing someone, but headband looked more ridiculous); earpad and headband stitching is less thick (D600 has luxury-car-like leather seaming); more frame flexibility and knobs make build feel kind-of cheap (D600 plastic and design is more durable, just not for you); less spacious sound (D600 huge earcups help here, just not for fitting); built-in amplifier works best at lower volumes (D600 scales well with powerful amps, sold seperately)

Amazon.uk has the D401, which supposedly improves the built-in amp, for rather cheap, so I highly recommend it. Just get used to headband adjustment with earcup rotating for a few days before your flight to get used to fitting your head. Also, built-in amping leaks a good amount of sound, so hear how it works from outside the earcups, so that you can be considerate to others around you. Lastly, burn-in the drivers with pink noise and some songs on repeat for at least 25 hours total, so that your trip will have smoother sound.
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