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post #31 of 176

By the way that is great Peart solo.  Maybe best I have seen!

post #32 of 176

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyro View Post

Neil Peart was my favorite for decades until I was introduced to Jazz.   My two favorites now are Dave Weckl and Antonio Sanchez.   There are listeners and there are drummers.  Sanchez and Weckl represent the best in the world of jazz (among many others).  If any doubts I ask you to google each of them for 20 min or so and see what they can do (and teach).  They both teach drumming but Weckl in particular has given back more to the drumming world than perhaps any drummer living today.  He flat out loves teaching.  I am no musiciam but am floored by his willingness to help others and watching his teaching videos.  As far as Sanchez and Weckl , I have read that they both chuckle when they say it's usually the non-musicians that applaud their super fast insane licks where the normal musicisans in the audiences appreciate the other underneaath happenings that they carry the music with.

 

For anyone that is not familiar with Antonio Sanchez.  He is here with the Pat Metheny Group.  If you don't care to watch the whole 7min at least go to the 4:20 mark onward to see a master on his instrument.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efERFCN0B_0

Great point Spyro.  I notice that same phenomenon at many concerts.  The drummer will be seemingly going about his / her business to most folks while I'm shaking my head in awe at the "underneath happenings" they are doing to groove, accent, or drive the composition.  Sure the drum solo pyrotechnics are fun but after a while it is just so much showing off.  I can still remember watching Bill Bruford with his eponymous group playing in a small club and seeing his lips mouth "1-2-3-4-5-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-1-2-...". 

 

Musicians and the public at large attend the same concerts but see different shows.

 

 

post #33 of 176

As a non-musician this still is very cool to me.  No dramatic soloing or anything in the link below.  It must be almost 20 years old with Dave in a mullet hairdo. LOL!!  But it is again an example of how intricate a drummer's craft is.  Dave talks here about being able to practice interchanging rhythms and licks between each of your 4 limbs almost simultaneously to where it become second nature and you are not thinking about it.  It's a very simple thing he's playing but blows my mind how a person could master it interchangeably between each limb (left foor, right arm, left arm, right foot, voice...) Very cool.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRH-rAVuyus&feature=related


Edited by Spyro - 4/21/12 at 2:59pm
post #34 of 176
Thanks for the link Spyro. That is VERY cool! This level of independence is extremely difficult because it is not how most people are wired. I just finished an hour on my set so this sunk in. More work for me to do!
post #35 of 176
Thread Starter 

 

Yeah. I can sort of do the independence thing in a limited capacity. Only with pretty simple patterns for now and it takes conscious effort. It can be really hard to figure out the first time you try it. Getting to a level where you can improvise on top of it...jeez.

 

Anyways, speaking of "overrated" (other people apparently perceive this word as having a more negative connotation than I do :p), I'm not sure if anyone would be able to relate to this, but I would say Aaron Gillespie from Underoath is another one, albeit an understandable one because most people who think/thought so are/were young fans of the band. He is very good in the context of the music though, and was a lot more creative than other guys in similar bands at the time. A lot of people actually started trying to imitate his style after Underoath first started becoming popular, my 15 year old self included, haha. On his own though...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kVSx_tf-Bc

 

:\

 

I have to give him credit for simultaneously being the singer as well, but then again, there is Nick D'Virgilio...

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czuRE6W4LS8


Edited by manveru - 4/21/12 at 4:24pm
post #36 of 176

I would have to agree with John Bonham. I remember my cousin, who was just starting to play drums, become fascinated with his playing. Don't get me wrong, he's a good drummer and everything, but I could never just see what people saw in him.

post #37 of 176
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post

I would have to agree with John Bonham. I remember my cousin, who was just starting to play drums, become fascinated with his playing. Don't get me wrong, he's a good drummer and everything, but I could never just see what people saw in him.

 

Mm. I like him, just not the best in the world. He has his moments, and at least what he lacks in skill/talent he seems to make up for in spirit.

post #38 of 176

Ringo, I've always thought of him as the guy they send to get coffee.

post #39 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveA View Post
No one can say that Ringo Starr was / is a good technical drummer, certainly not deserving of all the adulation he received with those other three shaggy lads, right?  But in my opinion, Ringo FIT the Beatles.  He played well in the pocket and was a good time keeper.  He played nothing flashy but what he did play was totally in the spirit of their songs and it is hard to imagine any other drummer on the throne behind those Ludwigs.

 

In my mind, a bigger sin is overplaying.

Good point. Ringo Starr was a great 'character' who fit in well with John, George and Paul. The classic comment was when John Lennon was asked 'So is Ringo Starr the best drummer in the world?'. John gave his trademark smirk and said 'He isn't even the best drummer in the Beatles'.

 

I agree. Music shouldn't be all about technical ability. It can be important, obviously in classical music, but mainstream music needs more characters and uniqueness. I mean listen to David Bowie, hardly the best singer in the world, but he sounds unique. thats worth more than anything IMO.

 

When I listen to bands like Dream Theater, I love the playing. Its great to listen to. Some of the timings and complex fills and offbeat rhythms, but sometimes I have to stop listening, as it can get too much.


Edited by zardon - 5/8/12 at 8:41am
post #40 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatcat28037 View Post

Ringo, I've always thought of him as the guy they send to get coffee.


I don't think he was one of the top five drummers in The Beatles. tongue.gif Just kidding. I actually think he's an underrated drummer.

post #41 of 176

He was in 30 movies.

post #42 of 176

Hmmmm.......Yes...may be No

post #43 of 176
Thread Starter 

There is certainly a class of drummers who are not technically amazing but just darn good anyways. Aside from Ringo, Sam Fogarino from Interpol and Yukihiro Takahashi from Yellow Magic Orchestra are two that come to mind.

post #44 of 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by manveru View Post

What drummers do you think are overrated? Here's a few of mine:

 

1. Neil Peart - Seriously, what do people see in this guy? Just because he's in Rush doesn't make him good. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying he's terrible or anything, but I at least have never seen/heard him do anything really impressive. Overall very forgettable.

 

2. John Bonham - It seems to me like there's a similar "he's good because he's in Led Zeppelin" syndrome going on here, BUT I actually hesitate a little to call him overrated. I think he does actually live up to his name for the most part. Waaaaaaay better than Peart. Still, I don't think he's quite as good as some people  make him out to be.

 

Also just noticed that this is my 666th post. evil_smiley.gif

 

Go find the guy who sounded like John Bonham before Bonham forged his style.

He does not exist.

John created a style, a template that virtually every hard rock drummer who came after him after owes a debt of gratitude to.

He had a phenomal mastery of odd time signatures, a mastery of various genres.

They don't sound awkward, they just flow, they sound very musical.

This was about inventing a new style, a new vocabulary, a new way of playing.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveA View Post

Interesting concept “overrated”.

 

Let’s take Neil Peart since he is on your list.  I am not a Rush fan so I have not spent any time listening to how well (or not) he plays within that band’s construct.  Being a hobby drummer myself, I appreciate the work he has done to promote drumming and percussion in the industry.  I have friends that really enjoy his playing with Rush and that is good enough for them and me: not my cup of tea but so what?

 

No one can say that Ringo Starr was / is a good technical drummer, certainly not deserving of all the adulation he received with those other three shaggy lads, right?  But in my opinion, Ringo FIT the Beatles.  He played well in the pocket and was a good time keeper.  He played nothing flashy but what he did play was totally in the spirit of their songs and it is hard to imagine any other drummer on the throne behind those Ludwigs.

 

To me, a good drummer is one who keeps rock solid time, doesn’t feel the need to fill every measure with strokes, and puts in a few  strokes where you perhaps don’t expect them but consistent with the mood of the composition.

 

In my mind, a bigger sin is overplaying.

 

Ringo............very, very true.

It is impossible to imagine anyone else playing those parts, inventing those parts.

The key here is he made up those parts and played them. Who else could have thought those parts up?

I see very few other drummers who have created such a unique style.

Try to find the guy who sounded like Ringo before Ringo, he doesn't exist.

Ringo is another guy who developed a style which is often copied, but never duplicated.

His influence on a generation of players is incredible, immeasurable.

Ringo is the guy who played on Revolver, Rubber Soul, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, The White Album, Abbey Road, Let It Be. What an incredible stylist! Who else can makes this claim?

George Martin said that it was very rare that they had to stop a take because Ringo made a mistake, it was almost always someone else. Martin alsp pointed out that Ringo had no problem playing Lennon's odd time signatures. 


Edited by Chris J - 6/4/12 at 6:05pm
post #45 of 176
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris J View Post

Go find the guy who sounded like John Bonham before Bonham forged his style.

He does not exist.

John created a style, a template that virtually every hard rock drummer who came after him after owes a debt of gratitude to.

He had a phenomal mastery of odd time signatures.

They don't sound awkward, they just flow, they sound very musical.

This was about inventing a new style, a new vocabulary a new way off playing.

 

Ringo............very very true.

It is impossible to imagine anyone else alying those parts.

The key here is he made up those parts and played them. Who else could have thought those parts up?

I see very few other drummers who have created such a unique style.

Try to find the guy who sounded like Ringo before Ringo, he doesn't exist.

Ringo is another guy who develpoed a style which is often copied, but never duplicated.

His influence on a generation of players is incredible, immeasurable.

Ringo is the guy who played on Revolver, Rubber Soul, Sgt. Pepper, Magical Mystery Tour, The White Album, Abbey Road, Let It Be. What an incredible stylist!

 

Bonham-Like I've said, I actually do like him a lot. I just don't think he's the best in the world by any means as he is often called.

 

Ringo-I agree.

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