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Linux users unite! - Page 11

post #151 of 392

?? 

http://www.skype.com/en/download-skype/skype-for-linux/

Works well enough, some hiccups from the previous beta to this one, some features aren't present, but overall it works better than most chat clients on *nix.

post #152 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by gopanthersgo1 View Post

Yet you can't get Skype working on any of them...

 

Hmmm...that might be a Skype issue...their linux support has always been s**t, I don't know how it is now.

post #153 of 392

Anyone been playing the Left 4 Dead 2 and Portal Linux Betas? I feel like Valve deserves a huge pat on the back for making such huge progress in Linux gaming, and have hopes other developers will follow.

post #154 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riku540 View Post

I feel like Valve deserves a huge pat on the back for making such huge progress in Linux gaming, and have hopes other developers will follow.

 

Yes they do.

So far for me, programming on Linux has always been a pleasant experience. 

post #155 of 392

I use Xubuntu 13.04 on my HP dc5750, and it's great, aside from my iPod Shuffle 2nd gen, I'm almost completely switched over to it. :) Also got it tweaked to look like 10.04 for the lols.

   

  

 

 


Edited by HPuser9083 - 5/23/13 at 9:39pm
post #156 of 392

The more I work on software development, the more I feel Linux has better tools and capabilities that Windows either doesn't have, or are switched off by default for security reasons.

The command line is awesome, it works on all kinds of platforms, slow and fast, and debugging is easier.

On top of that its free to use.

 

I'm still perplexed why Windows is still preferred, unless Microsoft pays for it.

post #157 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

The more I work on software development, the more I feel Linux has better tools and capabilities that Windows either doesn't have, or are switched off by default for security reasons.

The command line is awesome, it works on all kinds of platforms, slow and fast, and debugging is easier.

On top of that its free to use.

 

I'm still perplexed why Windows is still preferred, unless Microsoft pays for it.

Better tools and capabilities in what way? Honestly curious.

post #158 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeti tunes View Post

Better tools and capabilities in what way? Honestly curious.

 

Stuff inside the system. For example, loopback network adapters that exist by default, pretty handy for testing.  An API that doesn't change with every release. Multiple Desktops. Command line tools like Grep, Perl, Sed/Awk, Find etc. A lot of toolchains which don't work on windows.

SMP support out of the box.

Especially if you're working on cross compiling or embedded architectures, Linux has a lot more support.

 

Oh, and most people I see get stuck up about MS Office. It seems they get Windows because it runs Office, which is fine if you're doing a lot of document work. But for home? I don't think so.


Edited by proton007 - 5/21/13 at 6:25pm
post #159 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

 

Stuff inside the system. For example, loopback network adapters that exist by default, pretty handy for testing.  An API that doesn't change with every release. Multiple Desktops. Command line tools like Grep, Perl, Sed/Awk, Find etc. A lot of toolchains which don't work on windows.

SMP support out of the box.

Especially if you're working on cross compiling or embedded architectures, Linux has a lot more support.

 

Oh, and most people I see get stuck up about MS Office. It seems they get Windows because it runs Office, which is fine if you're doing a lot of document work. But for home? I don't think so.


I think it's a matter of preference really. I programmed for 4 years solely in Visual Studio (c#) and found the entire .net framework extraordinarily convenient. Of course when I worked for that company, the target platform was other Windows boxes so that made sense. For past year however I've been doing much more networking and *nix development because well... that's now my target platform.

 

I will agree that *nix out of the box offers more flexibility at the command line, however you must keep in mind that this is because the command line in Windows is so rarely used any more. The things that make this an advantage for *nix is this small things (can't tail a file in Windows right out of the box, I mean c'mon...). And yes Office is the best business productivity suite out there which is why Windows is (largely) still popular in the enterprise landscape. Personally I use Windows at home because I'm a gamer and until most Steam games get ported over to some Linux variant looks like I'm sticking with it for a while.

post #160 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeti tunes View Post


I think it's a matter of preference really. I programmed for 4 years solely in Visual Studio (c#) and found the entire .net framework extraordinarily convenient. Of course when I worked for that company, the target platform was other Windows boxes so that made sense. For past year however I've been doing much more networking and *nix development because well... that's now my target platform.

 

If you're working for developing on the Windows platform, then obviously it'll make sense to work on Windows.

But, as I've mentioned some of my co workers have reported issues with supporting XP and Windows 7 because a program made for one wouldn't work on the other because the API calls were doing something else. But I may be wrong.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yeti tunes View Post

 

I will agree that *nix out of the box offers more flexibility at the command line, however you must keep in mind that this is because the command line in Windows is so rarely used any more. The things that make this an advantage for *nix is this small things (can't tail a file in Windows right out of the box, I mean c'mon...). And yes Office is the best business productivity suite out there which is why Windows is (largely) still popular in the enterprise landscape. Personally I use Windows at home because I'm a gamer and until most Steam games get ported over to some Linux variant looks like I'm sticking with it for a while.

 

There are a lot of times I've ended up installing Cygwin on Windows because I wanted to use some GNU tools (gcc, gdb etc) and ofcourse all the command line goodies.

I have a Windows partition as well, with games, but depending on the time I have on hand, it doesn't see a lot of use. As of now, its Linux 99% of the time.

post #161 of 392

I think people really like the Microsoft IDE for all of its features or maybe they are just used to the IDE.

 

What language do you program in Proton and what IDE do you use, or do you use any text editor?
 

post #162 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by meat01 View Post

I think people really like the Microsoft IDE for all of its features or maybe they are just used to the IDE.

 

What language do you program in Proton and what IDE do you use, or do you use any text editor?
 

 

There's no choice if you're working for MS apps, you need to use the IDE because the compiler is bundled with it.

My office still uses Windows, and most of us use some other editor like Sublime/Komodo/Notepad++/Emacs for coding and the IDE just for its IDE features.

 

I use Emacs if working on simple files, and Eclipse if I need an IDE.

I've programmed in Python and C mostly, a bit of C++ (I wasn't impressed. Its a mess to code in).  Trying assembly for learning.


Edited by proton007 - 5/26/13 at 12:03am
post #163 of 392

Been fairly fun picking up Limbo and Go....using the time I normally waste during commutes to study up on that. 

 

And in more recent news I've managed to horribly butcher my Sabotage install by forcefully implanting sbase into there. Broke faster than you could say M50s are the shizzle.

Also patiently waiting for the Alpine move to musl.....

 

On a personal note, my main laptop rig has been flying by with st + monsterwm the past few days. Sure Termite has pango and better rendering of my strange foreign people music title fonts, but st is just too svelte to pass up....And monsterwm hits a sweet spot since it's mostly how I would've set things up on dwm prior (attachaside, etc). It's amazing how I've haven't basically touched anything on my Arch install for a year up until recently...guess I must've been too productive :P Did a cleanup too, and now we're sitting at 410 packages installed. There was a LOT of cruft. Like back from my FVWM days cruft.

 

EDIT: Oh, and some screenies are always nice -

   


Edited by TwinQY - 8/1/13 at 10:23pm
post #164 of 392
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwinQY View Post

Been fairly fun picking up Limbo and Go....using the time I normally waste during commutes to study up on that. 

 

And in more recent news I've managed to horribly butcher my Sabotage install by forcefully implanting sbase into there. Broke faster than you could say M50s are the shizzle.

Also patiently waiting for the Alpine move to musl.....

 

On a personal note, my main laptop rig has been flying by with st + monsterwm the past few days. Sure Termite has pango and better rendering of my strange foreign people music title fonts, but st is just too svelte to pass up....And monsterwm hits a sweet spot since it's mostly how I would've set things up on dwm prior (attachaside, etc). It's amazing how I've haven't basically touched anything on my Arch install for a year up until recently...guess I must've been too productive :P Did a cleanup too, and now we're sitting at 410 packages installed. There was a LOT of cruft. Like back from my FVWM days cruft.

 

EDIT: Oh, and some screenies are always nice -

   

Sweet looking layouts. I really love the look and feel of tiling managers, but I just can't get used to them. I need to just sit down and learn all the key commands.

post #165 of 392

You can dictate the keybindings yourself, so what I did when I first started using dwm was just made spawning terminals the only keybinding aside from changing layouts and resizing the stacks. That way I added on the various other bindings bit by bit, this way they'd all gradually accumulate to something more intuitive. Since a lot of my laptops are Thinkpads from the IBM era, a lot of them don't have MOD4 (the Windows key), so I always bind everything to MOD1 (most tilers already do that, but some like wmii don't). 

 

And of course I keep the same keybindings whenever I change to another tiler, so the experience is usually universal - it's just the tiling logic that's changed. A really easy way to do this is to not actually use the default keybinder and just use xkeybind to spawn all the programs.

 

When I finally get the time, I'd love to try and go a bit more in depth into experiencing other tilers. I think the fact that there's such a huge variety of different window placement logic is really enthralling when one gets into it. One of my pet projects from long ago was building one of my own nifty wms from the tinywm template. Ended up just being a really crippled dwm in the process so eventually stuck to that.

 

Have these listed and pre-installed, waiting for me to give them a test run:

- alopex

- wingo (floating more or less with some tiling capabilities)

- bspwm

- 2bwm (see wingo)

- herbstluftwm (actually using this quite a bit but still need to get more in depth about it)

- evilwm 

- xmonad (now that I can do a bit of Haskell I think it's high time I write my own config from scratch)

- wmfs2 (tried it out last week, really nice, definitely want to try again)

- goomwwm (the placement logic is pretty much semi-tilish)

- velox

There's a lot more but I haven't formally written them down for myself in the list, just bookmarked. 

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