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Best Decade for Music - Page 3

post #31 of 118
Not to mention Grizzly Bear, Animal Collective, Andrew Bird and I think we have a few Elliott smith albums this decade. Oh, and Funeral by Arcade fire, which might be my favorite album overall.

As a sidenote, Zanth, now that I see some of your music taste, I understand why you love grados so much.
post #32 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wmcmanus View Post
65'-'74
Very good choice, would have to agree. Started to peter out in the mid 70's. Pretty much short spurts of greatness after that.
post #33 of 118
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Originally Posted by Zanth View Post
I didn't realize your opinion was the gold standard I must grade music by? Wow, how thoughtless of me!

To you they are boring, to others they are some of the freshest and most exhilarating albums of all time. I don't believe I used the word genius anywhere, and Radiohead is certainly not ordinary. They don't make music that anyone else does, it might not be your cup of tea, but ordinary they certainly are not.
Um, that's kinda why I wrote it floors me...well aware that others might not feel the same. I stand by ordinariness, though. That's gold.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zanth View Post
I'd argue that the 60's and 70's were very much derivative of the 40's through the 50's, not that that is a bad thing but nothing really original was being created that the rock n' rollers and blues folks hadn't already tested out, not to mention the blue grass and country folks. Basically, and volumes have been written on the subject, much of the music that is regarded as classic rock, the best of the best was culled from the grand efforts of blacks and southern whites doing their thing 20-30 years earlier without much credit to them.
The history lesson is touching, but I'm inclined to believe that anyone who thinks the music of the '60s and '70s is derivative of the '40s and '50s hasn't done much listening to the '40s and '50s. Let's forget jazz altogether, cuz those distinctions are much too easy. If we're talking about rock, though, we know that Eric Clapton lifted tons of licks from Robert Johnson (who was dead before 1940, but no matter), but are you really saying that Cream and Derek and the Dominos sound like King of the Delta Blues Singers? Do, say, Ray Charles and Leadbelly render Van Morrison superfluous? What is the music of James Brown or Sly and the Family Stone derivative of? It's certainly not like the pastiche '70s hard/classic rock flavors I hear in the White Stripes—and I say that as someone who is crazy about what I consider Jack White's punk-blues record White Blood Cells. And to Clapton's credit, he has always been upfront about where he got his sh-t from, even backed it up with checks to Johnson's executors. The way I see it, influence is one thing, derivative is another.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zanth View Post
Yet I stand by my statement that this decade is the best because anyone can enjoy the music of the past and get the great stuff being released daily: Fleet Foxes, Horse Feathers, Bon Iver, White Stripes, Radiohead, TV on the Radio etc among many others.
Since we're scattering opinions, here's a few: Fleet Foxes, Horse Feathers, Bon Iver? In my opinion—which you've assured me I'm entitled to—they flat-out suck…no redeeming values whatsoever. Radiohead's a snooze except for Kid A…I already mentioned the White Stripes…TV On the Radio turned into a great band on Return to Cookie Mountain. Enjoy the rest of your decade.
post #34 of 118
80s hands down. Back then I didnt listen to music as much as I did later on or now but still those bands/artists made real music. Big stuff!
post #35 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yikes View Post
and bringing up the rear (Very far to the rear) would be the 00's
I'd argue an alternate hypothesis. As some people get old, they stop exploring and finding new things, but prefer instead to listen to the same old recordings over and over again. Sounds to me like you're drying up, Yikes
post #36 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tru blu View Post
The history lesson is touching, but I'm inclined to believe that anyone who thinks the music of the '60s and '70s is derivative of the '40s and '50s hasn't done much listening to the '40s and '50s. Let's forget jazz altogether, cuz those distinctions are much too easy. If we're talking about rock, though, we know that Eric Clapton lifted tons of licks from Robert Johnson (who was dead before 1940, but no matter), but are you really saying that Cream and Derek and the Dominos sound like King of the Delta Blues Singers? Do, say, Ray Charles and Leadbelly render Van Morrison superfluous? What is the music of James Brown or Sly and the Family Stone derivative of? It's certainly not like the pastiche '70s hard/classic rock flavors I hear in the White Stripes—and I say that as someone who is crazy about what I consider Jack White's punk-blues record White Blood Cells. And to Clapton's credit, he has always been upfront about where he got his sh-t from, even backed it up with checks to Johnson's executors. The way I see it, influence is one thing, derivative is another.
It's easy to cherry pick artists from modern music that you consider derivative and compare them to artists from the past that you consider revolutionary, but that means nothing. In any given time period, there will always be some musicians that recycle past ideas and others that break boundaries - that's one thing about music that will never change. The 00's are my favorite decade, and it has absolutely nothing to do with Jack White or indie rock.

Determining which decade is the least derivative is a mostly subjective discussion, but my vote would absolutely be for the current decade. With the increased accessibility for making and listening to music nowadays, there is some truly unique and innovative music out there that would never have been able to find an audience in the past. You might not like them (most don't), but it's hard to claim that avante garde bands like Maudlin of the Well, Mr. Bungle, and Sleepytime Gorilla Museum haven't pushed boundaries.

Still, in 10 years, I'll probably vote for the 2010's. Music is constantly evolving, and in my opinion, it's for the better.
post #37 of 118
sorry, double post...?
post #38 of 118
I own about 800 LP's and 1300 CD's (that is store bought...). My music collection (only counting "Pop/Rock" ranges from, roughly, 1965 to present...) The biggest musical rush for me is finding something new that gives me that "buzz" that I've gotten when the best music of the past was new. So, for me, the best decade is always the decade that's ahead and then the decade that's ahead of that. The best music has yet to be made!
post #39 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tintin47 View Post
Not to mention Grizzly Bear, Animal Collective, Andrew Bird and I think we have a few Elliott smith albums this decade. Oh, and Funeral by Arcade fire, which might be my favorite album overall.

As a sidenote, Zanth, now that I see some of your music taste, I understand why you love grados so much.
Yeah those bands are all substantially grand. They may not get the radio play they deserve but there are certainly plenty of people who buy their music and realize they are listening to folks committed not just to creating interesting music but also committed to the "album" as an album.

As for my tastes in music, though I really like those bands and the ones you mentioned, I am also heavy into jazz ('44-'64) as well as a plethora of "classical" music particularly small ensembles and up to concertos. I'm not as much a fan of symphonies overall which may explain why I was able to hold out for such a long time for a headphone that provides a big soundstage.
post #40 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakercj93 View Post
It's easy to cherry pick artists from modern music that you consider derivative and compare them to artists from the past that you consider revolutionary, but that means nothing. In any given time period, there will always be some musicians that recycle past ideas and others that break boundaries - that's one thing about music that will never change. The 00's are my favorite decade, and it has absolutely nothing to do with Jack White or indie rock.
The hardest thing about arguing on head-fi is that folks don't read entire threads before they respond. None of those bands were merely cherrypicked, or at least it wasn't me doing the picking...I responded directly to things that were already cited.

On another note, for the record I also think that Arcade Fire's Funeral is easily one of the best rock records of this decade, and can stand tall next to any rock landmark. It's that good.
post #41 of 118
I think the NEXT decade will be the best. All the music we have now, and lots more new and exciting stuff.. Can't wait
post #42 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by craiglester View Post
I think the NEXT decade will be the best. All the music we have now, and lots more new and exciting stuff.. Can't wait
Shucks, I should have said next decade too I'm in full agreement. I can't wait.
post #43 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickyboyo View Post
It is almost shameful to say it, but the '80's gave us some great music.

The Smiths, The Cure, The Stone Roses, Joy Division, New Order, Echo and the Bunnymen, Billy Bragg, Pulp, Lloyd Cole and the Commotions, The The...... the list of great British bands from that era is too long to list. Some great acts from USA and Australia to. As kitsch as it may seem, the 80's were kicking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by moriez View Post
80s hands down. Back then I didnt listen to music as much as I did later on or now but still those bands/artists made real music. Big stuff!
I agree. 80s. No contest. No mas. Next thread.
post #44 of 118
Based on my musical preferences, this decade has more albums I like than any other decade, though some of my very favorite albums were made in the '90's.

I agree with craiglester and Zanth, the best music has yet to come. To argue otherwise is to say that the best scientific breakthroughs have already been made and everything else is a derivative.

It has to be said though that this question does a better job of inadvertently pointing out the respondent's age rather than getting a meaningful answer.
post #45 of 118
That's easy for me.......... in classical composition 1900-1910........

in popular music 1965-1975
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