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does Sansa CLIP have a true line out?

post #1 of 54
Thread Starter 
I am giving up the idea of buying Sansa Fuze
post #2 of 54
The Clip most certainly does not have a true line out, seeing as it lacks a dock connector, making its headphone out its only audio port. The Fuze is another story; why are you giving up on it?
post #3 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by epithetless View Post
The Clip most certainly does not have a true line out, seeing as it lacks a dock connector, making its headphone out its only audio port. The Fuze is another story; why are you giving up on it?
the dock line with fuze is not a real line out.
and i have to make one line out dock for fuze.
thats so complicated. more difficult than SAT
post #4 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schoenberg View Post
the dock line with fuze is not a real line out.
Before anyone makes that conclusion, read this please.
post #5 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClieOS View Post
Before anyone makes that conclusion, read this please.
i noticed and replied already. thank you for your great help gain. but i am still confused a little.
post #6 of 54
thread hijacking: How does the lineout of the fuze compare to other sansa that uses the same Soc?
post #7 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schoenberg View Post
I am giving up the idea of buying Sansa Fuze
No real line out. However, the headphone out has a very clean signal (so long as the equalizer is flat) and it sounds very good when amped.
post #8 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Earwax View Post
No real line out.
Post #4?
post #9 of 54
hear's how wiki describes line out
Quote:
The signal out of line out remains at a constant level, regardless of the current setting of the volume control. You can connect recording equipment to line out and record the signal, without having to listen to it through the device's speaker, and without the loudness of the recording changing if you change the volume control setting of the device while you are recording.

The impedance is around 100 ohms, the voltage can reach 2 volts peak-to-peak with levels referenced to -10 dBV (300 mV) at 10k ohms, and frequency response of most modern equipment is advertised as 20Hz-20kHz (although other factors influence frequency response).[citation needed] This impedance level is much higher than the usual 4 or 8 ohms of a speaker, such that a speaker connected to line out essentially short circuits the op-amp. Even if the impedances would match, yielding the theoretical maximum power transfer of 50%, the power supplied through line out is not enough to drive a speaker.
How accurate is it and how we translate this to the fuze's line out?
post #10 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peyotero View Post
How accurate is it and how we translate this to the fuze's line out?
All I can tell you is Fuze's line-out has a 1.44V DC offset and a maximum AC peak-peak output amplitude of almost 2V.
post #11 of 54
So can we say it's a true line out simply because it does what a line out's supposed to do?
post #12 of 54
Besides the wiki page about line-out, I'll also suggest you take a read at line-level and nominal-level. Line-out (port) essentially is outputting line-level signal, and line-level signal is nominal level signal described in ratio of dB against a standard reference voltage. Nominal level is defined as the level where device is designed to operate which results in best dynamic range. So in a sense, whatever level that gives the best dynamic range will define what the line-level is - that's my understanding.
post #13 of 54
A bit to advanced for me but if I get this right, nominal level is what I miss in dap's lineouts. It's just weak compared to a full size CDP or even those vintage [trans]portable CDP's...
post #14 of 54
In simpler terms, dynamic range is set by output power, background noise and distortion. Generally speaking the higher the output power the better the signal-to-(background)noise ratio, but when the output is too high, distortion starts to increase noticeably (which add more noise) - so nominal level is where the signal-to-(background)noise ratio is at its best before distortion set in, and that is where the best dynamic range is.

I would imagine that the smaller amp section (quality) and the limited power supply (quantity) in DAP means its dynamic range is more compressed compared to full size CDP, thus the line-out is not able to match up with the big fellows.
post #15 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClieOS View Post
Post #4?

I was answering the question in the title of the thread about the CLIP.
I should not have quoted that bit about giving up on getting a fuze.
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