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How to equalize your headphones: A Tutorial - Page 65

post #961 of 966

So I have given this a try and just going to give a little report on what I've experienced.

Equipment: akg k240, ibasso d6

 

 

So of course, I've noticed a drop in the highs, which is to be expected. What I also thought I'd expect is a flattening of the sound, namely a reduction in bass and highs. The highs most definitely were tamed, but probably as a psychological counteraction, bass seemed to be boosted despite my reductions in the slight bass peaks. Is this what others have experienced as well? or am I just delirious from listening to too much pink noise and sine waves :confused:

post #962 of 966

Once peaks are reduced the overall volume can be increased.  So other frequencies are more audible.  This is what you want - a wider range of sound which results in more detail and a expanded sound stage.

 

It takes practice to set the EQ.  I usually do it when I'm well rested, and not distracted.  In the past I would get a certain EQ fatigue which lead to mistakes.  Now I try to do it in 10-15 minutes, and then back off.  This seems to yield better results.

post #963 of 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico613 View Post

Once peaks are reduced the overall volume can be increased.  So other frequencies are more audible.  This is what you want - a wider range of sound which results in more detail and a expanded sound stage.

It takes practice to set the EQ.  I usually do it when I'm well rested, and not distracted.  In the past I would get a certain EQ fatigue which lead to mistakes.  Now I try to do it in 10-15 minutes, and then back off.  This seems to yield better results.

How often do you equalize your phones? I decided to follow your advice and skip the pink noise part and adjust mainly though trying to flatten the sine wave. This is what I experienced:

With a pair of cheap yet trustworthy in ears, the signature is pretty flat and there's like, 3 audible peaks only. With Edition 8 there's about 10 of them or more, sometimes occurring through one ear alone. The signature seems heavily modified over a flat one, and tempering with it feels like possibly ruining the tuning that the engineers made during the design.

I find that chopping some peaks down by 2-3dB gives me an acceptable loss of fidelity in those frequencies, any more and I feel that I am losing information (and when it's on the high frequencies, the sound appears muddy). From what I read, it should not be like that. Am I doing something wrong or am I approaching this with the wrong mentality?
post #964 of 966

I don't use the same system for EQ so it is hard for me to comment about the details.  Hopefully others can comment about your experience.

 

I will post a summary of my procedure soon.  The principles of EQ are the same, so I think the knowledge is transferable from one system to another.

post #965 of 966
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rico613 View Post

 

I will post a summary of my procedure soon.  The principles of EQ are the same, so I think the knowledge is transferable from one system to another.

 

I will definitely enjoy reading your summary and get one step closer to understanding the dynamics behind proper equalisation. 

post #966 of 966

I hope to get to it soon . . . .

 

EDIT:

 

There are significant advantages to equalizing headphones.  The EQ process corrects artifacts in the hardware, (cables, tubes, headphones), and also corrects for hearing loss of the listener.  This is one of the great advantages of listening with cans - the frequency curve can be custom tailored to the individual.  The improved sound quality can be stunning.  The sound stage is greatly expanded and there is greater detail across all audible frequencies.

 

Here are some basics of the method I use.  I use frequency specific sine wave files that match the 30 band equalizer.  I use a Rane DEQ 60L.  (However, the KlarkTeknik DN 370 may be a better choice these days.)   The equalization sliders control frequencies at 1/3 octave intervals.  These frequencies are: 25Hz, 31.5Hz, 40Hz, 50Hz, 63Hz, 80Hz, 100Hz, 125Hz, 160Hz, 200Hz, 250Hz, 315Hz, 400Hz, 500Hz, 630Hz, 800Hz, 1,000Hz, 1,250Hz, 1,600Hz, 2,000Hz, 2,500Hz, 3,150Hz, 4,000Hz, 5,000Hz, 6,300Hz, 8,000Hz, 10,000Hz, 12,500,Hz 16,000Hz, 20,000Hz   (don't waste time adjusting frequencies you can't hear.)

 

 

I download the sine wave files from Wavetones.com and play them from iTunes or from a CD that I burned using iTunes.

 

I tune the right channel and left channel separately.  Using the CD remote control or arrow keys on the computer, the sine wave files are played in rapid succession so it sounds like a frequency sweep.  This enables you to identify the specific frequencies that sound too loud or too muted.  Adjust those frequencies until the sweep sounds smooth.   To fine tune a frequency, I usually repeat the 3 or 4 lower frequencies that precede the frequency I'm adjusting.  The volume should increase as the frequency increases.  The frequency curve is not linear, it is a logarithmic progression.

 

Here are a few tips when using this method.  Start with each slider centered.  Adjust the EQ when you are well rested and can devote your full attention to the task without distractions.  Don't spend too much time adjusting the frequencies.  I get better results in 5-10 minute sessions than I do spending 30 minutes on it.  Try adjusting only 2 or three frequencies at a time, until you become proficient.  Switch between the bypass signal and the EQ signal to hear the difference.  Adjust the volume so the EQ mode is the same as the bypass mode. 

 

It takes practice and a lot of patients.  Don't expect perfect results for a few weeks, but you should hear improvement fairly quickly.  IMPORTANT:  When it sounds terrible back off, get some rest, set the sliders to the centered position, and try it again the following day. 

 

This method should work with any EQ hardware or software.  More adjustments are needed for the higher frequencies.  If you are setting up your EQ software and have only 8-10 frequency notches, you will want to set most of those above 1KHz.

 

Here are some photos of my setup.  I'm using Senn HD 800s running off an Eddie Current Balancing Act.  (The EQ changes every time I roll a tube!)

 

In the photo below you will see a frequency analyzer sitting on top of the EQ.  I use the analyzer to flatten the curve before I do the listening adjustments.  The analyzer is highly useful, but not essential.


Edited by Rico613 - 6/23/14 at 3:38pm
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