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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 139

post #2071 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

Your link doesn't appear to be working but it might just be me


No you're right, it doesn't work for me either...

post #2072 of 3307

I love to bike, especially if I have some music playing, and I know that may be deemed unsafe, but I don't bike on busy roads, and take other paths, etc.

 

My bike is a pretty simple one, but even those have hiked up in price.

 

It has suspension on the front, but not on the back, and standard brakes.

Going off a curb then, it feels soft, and then crashes down, haha.

 

I've had it checked out, and its fine, but if I use the right brake, it brakes as normal, and slows. If I use the left, the back wheel stops, like pulling the handbrake on a car.

It can be pretty useful to get around tight corners if I'm honest, but don't know why it happens, and its annoying if you want to stop suddenly. The back wheel skids.

 

As for how I bike it though; I've gotten used to not using the seat. I tend to stand ride, and have now for many years.

It seems to work you out a lot more for shorter journeys too, and don't find my balance to be affected, and can use my own body as suspension.

post #2073 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by musical-kage View Post

I love to bike, especially if I have some music playing, and I know that may be deemed unsafe, but I don't bike on busy roads, and take other paths, etc.

 

My bike is a pretty simple one, but even those have hiked up in price.

 

It has suspension on the front, but not on the back, and standard brakes.

Going off a curb then, it feels soft, and then crashes down, haha.

 

I've had it checked out, and its fine, but if I use the right brake, it brakes as normal, and slows. If I use the left, the back wheel stops, like pulling the handbrake on a car.

It can be pretty useful to get around tight corners if I'm honest, but don't know why it happens, and its annoying if you want to stop suddenly. The back wheel skids.

 

As for how I bike it though; I've gotten used to not using the seat. I tend to stand ride, and have now for many years.

It seems to work you out a lot more for shorter journeys too, and don't find my balance to be affected, and can use my own body as suspension.

The back brake is pretty useless since most of the force in braking is directed to the front wheel. I only use the front brake.

post #2074 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamthem View Post

The back brake is pretty useless since most of the force in braking is directed to the front wheel. I only use the front brake.

I've heard that is very dangerous when going downhill.  Is that bad information? And what do you mean most of the force in braking is directed to the front wheel?

post #2075 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by John In Cali View Post

I've heard that is very dangerous when going downhill.  Is that bad information? And what do you mean most of the force in braking is directed to the front wheel?

 

About 80% of your total braking capacity comes from the front brake. You can push your backside further back on the seat to be able to apply more pressure on the front brake.

post #2076 of 3307

In regards to the last few posts..

Firstly, I would NEVER ride a bike while listening to music, regardless of the surroundings. Hearing is just so important on a bike, listening for cars, the sound of the surface you're riding on, gear changes.. also listening for trucks, as they are large, and their slip stream tends to pull you in towards them, so you have to be ready for them

In regards to standing up while riding, it's very useful for mountain biking, using your limbs as shock absorbers as described. but it uses up energy, and reduces the strength of you pedal strokes, so sitting is a much better way to cycle over any distance of smooth surface.

back brakes locking up is bad, you lose control of the back of your bike, and potentially crash, not a good idea. unless you intend for them to lock up when on a mountain trail or something.

When braking downhill, I tend to sit further back on my seat, to get my weight right over the back wheel, then drag gently on the back brake, adding in the front for more slowing power as needed, making sure to only ease the brakes on gently so that they won't lock up, or brake too quickly.
you certainly can brake with just your front down hills, but to me it feels a lot less secure
 

post #2077 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by John In Cali View Post

I've heard that is very dangerous when going downhill.  Is that bad information? And what do you mean most of the force in braking is directed to the front wheel?

When you brake the wheel that is being "braked" slows down applying a force to the bike. For the front wheel, the weight gets shifted forwards and you can apply more and more braking force without skidding on most paved surfaces (until you go over the handlebars or crash). For the back wheel, it tends to skid easily since it's "dragging" the bike to slow it down. Generally when I brake I only use the front wheel (which is why I have discs on the front and V-brake on the back).

 

When I go downhill I shift my weight backwards using my body as an airbrake and use the back brake. Shifting your weight backwards and dropping your center of gravity when you brake is essential as it prevents going over the handlebars with the front brakes and lets you put more force into the back brake when you brake. Going downhill + front brake is really dangerous since there's a much higher chance of going over the handlebars. I'm not sure if I brake right though, but that's how I do it. Basically: back brake for going downhill, front brake for normal stopping, drop your center of gravity and shift backwards when you brake and use your arms to brace yourself against the handlebars. Never use both brakes at the same time. And always be prepared to stop, the faster you go the more prepared you should be to brake very quickly.

 

From a mechanics point of view, the front brake is more "powerful" because when you brake the front wheel begins resisting the ground and pushing back. Because you have momentum, you move forwards relative to the wheel. Thus more force is applied to the wheel, resulting in a higher friction force. When you brake with the back wheel, you don't get that shifting of mass so the amount of force is significantly less.

Well I've only been cycling regularly for about 2 years but that's how I go about it.

post #2078 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamthem View Post

When you brake the wheel that is being "braked" slows down applying a force to the bike. For the front wheel, the weight gets shifted forwards and you can apply more and more braking force without skidding on most paved surfaces (until you go over the handlebars or crash). For the back wheel, it tends to skid easily since it's "dragging" the bike to slow it down. Generally when I brake I only use the front wheel (which is why I have discs on the front and V-brake on the back).

 

When I go downhill I shift my weight backwards using my body as an airbrake and use the back brake. Shifting your weight backwards and dropping your center of gravity when you brake is essential as it prevents going over the handlebars with the front brakes and lets you put more force into the back brake when you brake. Going downhill + front brake is really dangerous since there's a much higher chance of going over the handlebars. I'm not sure if I brake right though, but that's how I do it. Basically: back brake for going downhill, front brake for normal stopping, drop your center of gravity and shift backwards when you brake and use your arms to brace yourself against the handlebars. Never use both brakes at the same time. And always be prepared to stop, the faster you go the more prepared you should be to brake very quickly.

 

From a mechanics point of view, the front brake is more "powerful" because when you brake the front wheel begins resisting the ground and pushing back. Because you have momentum, you move forwards relative to the wheel. Thus more force is applied to the wheel, resulting in a higher friction force. When you brake with the back wheel, you don't get that shifting of mass so the amount of force is significantly less.

Well I've only been cycling regularly for about 2 years but that's how I go about it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post

In regards to the last few posts..

Firstly, I would NEVER ride a bike while listening to music, regardless of the surroundings. Hearing is just so important on a bike, listening for cars, the sound of the surface you're riding on, gear changes.. also listening for trucks, as they are large, and their slip stream tends to pull you in towards them, so you have to be ready for them

In regards to standing up while riding, it's very useful for mountain biking, using your limbs as shock absorbers as described. but it uses up energy, and reduces the strength of you pedal strokes, so sitting is a much better way to cycle over any distance of smooth surface.

back brakes locking up is bad, you lose control of the back of your bike, and potentially crash, not a good idea. unless you intend for them to lock up when on a mountain trail or something.

When braking downhill, I tend to sit further back on my seat, to get my weight right over the back wheel, then drag gently on the back brake, adding in the front for more slowing power as needed, making sure to only ease the brakes on gently so that they won't lock up, or brake too quickly.
you certainly can brake with just your front down hills, but to me it feels a lot less secure
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamerzhell View Post

 

About 80% of your total braking capacity comes from the front brake. You can push your backside further back on the seat to be able to apply more pressure on the front brake.

Thanks, that was all very informative and helpful.  I live in at the base of a mountain and it can get pretty steep.  Going back up is a lot of fun thoughtongue.gif.

post #2079 of 3307

Oh and I'd like to introduce myself. First time posting here. I'm surprised there's a "bike-fi" lol.

 

I generally post in general headphone sections, focusing mostly on low to mid range gear ($1-600).

 

I really enjoy cycling around aimlessly and just exploring the neighborhood. I cycle about once a week if there's no exams or whenever I feel like it if I have the free time, as well as to get around, such as meeting with friends and such. My bike is a modified Trek 7300 which I purchased roughly 1 year ago. I learned how to cycle as a child, and funnily enough I taught my (much older) sister to cycle before she went on a 2 week cross country!! bicycle tour. I've only been cycling regularly for about 2 years. Both of us love cycling, to the bemusement of our not so enthusiastic friends.

post #2080 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by vpivinylspinner View Post

Upgraded my road bike today.

 

1000

 

With the heavy Fulcrum Racing wheels on.

 

700

Sweet!!

post #2081 of 3307

As for braking you should use two fingers on the levers rather than your whole hand and if you have disc brakes only one finger is more than enough to work the brakes and you should be using both your brakes to stop regardless of what you are doing as that's what their there for.  Using only the front brake to stop can cause the pads to overheat and stick to the rim which is why I got rid of the brake on my fixed gear because there is no back brake and the front was over heating constantly.

 

That road bike is sweet and 15lbs with heavy wheels is crazy.  I'd imagine that must feel amazing on the road, I have never ridden a road bike that light but I have demoed a cannondale mountain bike at interbike that was around the 15lb mark and if not for the $15K price tag I would have dropped my Yeti in a heart beat for it because I felt like Lance Armstrong on it.

post #2082 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

I was unsure about belt drives and internal hubs but after seeing this video I think they are comparable to chains if not stronger

http://www.pinkbike.com/news/White-Balance-video-2012.html

 

 

 

Cool set up. 

post #2083 of 3307

Guys the whole argument over using front or back brake is missing the point. You're asking for troubles by using a single brake, irregardless of it being front or back. Bicycles have two brakes for a reason. You should always use both brakes. You should learn how strong both brakes are, and use the right amount of force on each lever so that both wheels have the same braking power. This is the only way to stay up on both wheels, at any angle, on any surface. Learning to use both brakes at the same time will save your life at some point. Jumping on only one brake in an emergency has the potential of making the situation worse than not braking at all.

 

Those who think the front brake is the only useful one obviously never rode out under freezing conditions. On ice or snow, it's a hell of a lot easier to loose grip on the front wheel than on the back wheel. A hell of a lot more dangerous too.

 

But hey, I suppose they had to install ABS brakes on car for a reason, right? So much easier to rely on a "feature" than to learn how to use something properly. 

post #2084 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

Guys the whole argument over using front or back brake is missing the point. You're asking for troubles by using a single brake, irregardless of it being front or back. Bicycles have two brakes for a reason. You should always use both brakes. You should learn how strong both brakes are, and use the right amount of force on each lever so that both wheels have the same braking power. This is the only way to stay up on both wheels, at any angle, on any surface. Learning to use both brakes at the same time will save your life at some point. Jumping on only one brake in an emergency has the potential of making the situation worse than not braking at all.

 

Those who think the front brake is the only useful one obviously never rode out under freezing conditions. On ice or snow, it's a hell of a lot easier to loose grip on the front wheel than on the back wheel. A hell of a lot more dangerous too.

 

But hey, I suppose they had to install ABS brakes on car for a reason, right? So much easier to rely on a "feature" than to learn how to use something properly. 



This guy. This guy right here.
Great post.

post #2085 of 3307
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

Guys the whole argument over using front or back brake is missing the point. You're asking for troubles by using a single brake, irregardless of it being front or back. Bicycles have two brakes for a reason. You should always use both brakes. You should learn how strong both brakes are, and use the right amount of force on each lever so that both wheels have the same braking power. This is the only way to stay up on both wheels, at any angle, on any surface. Learning to use both brakes at the same time will save your life at some point. Jumping on only one brake in an emergency has the potential of making the situation worse than not braking at all.

 

Those who think the front brake is the only useful one obviously never rode out under freezing conditions. On ice or snow, it's a hell of a lot easier to loose grip on the front wheel than on the back wheel. A hell of a lot more dangerous too.

 

But hey, I suppose they had to install ABS brakes on car for a reason, right? So much easier to rely on a "feature" than to learn how to use something properly. 

Oh that must be because I live in Australia, where we don't get snow. If you've ever experimented with how you brake under normal conditions (asphalt or dirt), you'll find that at maximum braking force simply tapping the back brake will make it skid (dangerously). That's because all of your force is on the front wheel. From what I've found, you can get maximum braking speed by braking just enough so that your back wheel barely carries any weight so you're just about to lift. If you use both brakes and you're working at close to 100% braking force then even if you put a tiny amount of pressure into the back brake the back wheel goes into a skid the whole bike can skid and you may end up in a nasty crash. I don't know how it feels like to brake when it's icy since it obviously doesn't snow in Australia.

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