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You know you're an audiophile when...

Discussion in 'Headphones (full-size)' started by ohhgourami, Mar 14, 2011.
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  1. takato14
    Quote:
    No... 
     
    Flat response =//////////////////////////////= neutral
     
    Neutrality of a headphone is determined by how closely it follows the human hearing curve. We do not hear flat. 
     
    image_preview.png
     
    This is the human ear. As you can see, the hearing curve varies at different volume levels.
     
    You can't just look at a graph and say "this is exactly what the headphone sounds like". Headphone graphs are corrected for HRTF (read here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head-related_transfer_function), so they're only usable for comparisons. What you see on the graph is not the raw curve from what the measuring mic heard.
     
    Please do research next time. Also, "flat" headphones do exist. One I know of is the SS-100. Not sure of the general sound, but most describe it as "special".
     
  2. Marvin7
    Why is correction of graph for HRTF measurement needed for comparison?
     
  3. headphone man07
    lol I do that so much it's so fun ,specially in currys the assistants are all like wah? what is this guy talking about, forward, fun sound with a decent passive isolation? must mean beats...

    You're an audiophile when instead of looking up epic fails you watch Tyll Hertsens review on beats solo and the hd's
     
  4. Argyris Contributor
    Quote:
     
    Because it makes it easier to see where the measurements deviate from the baseline. The actual baseline for measurements looks like that bumpy chart takato14 posted. Even if you put a trace for this on the graph, it would be difficult to tell the exact magnitude of the deviation. Plus, including an extra trace would make the graphs messy, and the whole thing would look a bit frightening for those who don't read these things every day and who assume flat line = correct. By compensating for the HRTF, the baseline becomes a flat line, which makes both the deviation from the baseline and the differences between different headphones' responses much easier to quantify.
     
    That said, for a headphone a perfect flat line is still not a desirable result because these charts must be interpreted. Essentially, you want your trace to start descending below 0 dB at around 1kHz and end up about 10 dB down at 20kHz. This is because it's not natural for a transducer to be a few inches from your eardrum, and no audio is mixed with that arrangement in mind. Treble energy dissipates with distance, so by the time a signal reaches your ear from a set of monitors or speakers, it's already lost some of its treble content. The gradual downward slope (or shelf) simulates this effect.
     
  5. linglingjr
    when you write several small essays about what neutral means: yep congratulations, you are all audiophiles.
     
    GloryUprising likes this.
  6. miceblue
    Quote:
    Here, this should clear things up:
     
    Neutral - neu-tral - noo-truh l: (adj): not taking part or giving assistance in a dispute or war between others
     
    [​IMG]
     
    CashNotCredit likes this.
  7. Hellbishop
    When you have fifteen headphones but it only feels like you have four.
     
    When your switching bookshelf speakers every two weeks with the ones piled up in the closet.
     
  8. CashNotCredit
    Quote:
    When four doesn't feel like enough.
     
  9. Jamesy1969
    Quote:
     
    That's just what I don't get. They're not. A genre in which the mid-bass is already prominent is not the genre to play on a system with a mid-bass hump.
     
    Am I missing something here???
     
  10. miceblue
    Quote:
    Yes?
    Why do people who listen to electronic music listen to it through bass-heavy headphones (i.e. basshead headphones)?
    Why do people who listen to rock music listen to it through treble-heavy headphones (i.e. Grado headphones)?
     
  11. Jamesy1969
    Quote:
     
    Honestly, I have no idea! I enjoy both genres and would rather listen on as "neutral" a 'phone as possible.
     
  12. DefQon
    Quote:
    Yep have repaired and modded a mates Studio while ago, the Pro's slightly improved than the Studio. Haven't heard the Solo's but have heard the Solo HD's if they are any different and have owned the Tour's, they are both absolute rubbish for the price they are set at, $50-80 I can understand but $190-240 is a straight forward kill yourself moment lol.
     
    Quote:
    While all the below multi-quote's I've included from other user's have questioned your statement, you do realise that a very large percentage of headphones being sold are not neutral, some entitle themselves to having it said being neutral or aiming for that neutral sound but it's completely not, for example Audeze advertise's their LCD2's as neutral headphones and I can tell you it is far from being completely neutral, both soundwise by ear's and measurements. Neutrality is good for when you want no alterations to the sound so it's just almost exact to the way the recording or a live music event is conducted or other purposes such as monitoring music pieces so you can identify artefacts in the piece your working with and to be honest your drawn more to your music if you have some coloration's to the sound.
    Quote:
    Exactly, couldn't have said it better myself.
     
    Quote:
     
    Quote:
    Most tend to see neutral as bass-lite since their is the aim of having no emphasis on the bass (which we all love :D ), not sure about mid-centric.
    Quote:
    +1, their is no enjoyment in listening to your music, if you can only hear part's of the music characteristically (by low's, mid's, high's, treble etc), more fun listening to the music when you can hear all part's of it clearly and distinguishable. Like looking through a clean window as compared to a dirty one (this goes back to veiled sound vs non-veiled sound).
    Quote:
    Definitely better for the price out there, but if you ever get your hands on a broken pair of Studio's or Pro's, take out the drivers and use it in an open shell without the equaliser (amp chip) and you'd be surprised how much better they sound compared to stock form (but still not totally worth $250-350, Monster is asking).
    Quote:
    Absolutely horrible for their retail price - yes, but abolutely horrible sounding, berating it to that level by your description, I think you're just overemphasising it bit too much, their are better out their but as I said, thanks to the EQ chip in the Studio's (not sure if the Pro's have one too), they don't sound that bad with rap/hip hop at all, actually to tell you the truth, for just rap and hip hop, if the Studio's/Pro's were a lot cheaper I'd easily pick it over the Pro700MK2's and M50's solely just for those genre's only.
     
    The shame thing is also is that while it is sort of over rated and over priced crap (for their value), a lot of people talk smack when it comes to Beat's or Skullcandy or whatever, bad labelling it even when they have not heard it, given that their are also alot of crap headphones/earphones from big reputable companies out their as well, it's worth a thought, but remember at the end of the day's it doesn't matter if your an audiophile or not, as long as you enjoy your music from whatever headphone/equipment component, that's all that matter's.
     
     


     
    Do you own, heard or have measured the SS-100 before?
     
  13. Roller
    Quote:
     
    Different strokes for different people.
     
  14. DefQon
    Quote:
     
    Quote:
     
    People have different preferences simple as that, it is sometimes more fun to listen to emphasised part's of sound with certain system's rather than just listening to a neutral or flat-line system it greatly depends on what genre your listening to as well. Your right a genre which already has prominent mid-bass should not be played on a system that emphasises it even more, but it will just remove the fun, without going overboard on how much mid-bass it add's on, you can get more fun out of your music.
     
    If everyone should just listen to neutral or flat lined systems with any genre that will be boring, their won't be any point of having to tube roll, opamp roll or even have tube amp's or coloured sig ss amp's, everyone should just stick with something neutral such as the Objective amp and a headphone and be done, but that's not the point, the point is to provide a diserable option for all kind's of audience, everyone has a different preference and liking to their music/genre, some people like complete neutrality, some people like bass, some people like treble peaks or bright high's (just as an example) the point is so we can have freedom with having thing's according to our preference.
     
    To put it in simpler words:
     
     


     
  15. Hellbishop
    Quote:
     
    When its always the last one.
     
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