Yamaha EPH-100
Feb 10, 2012 at 12:26 AM Post #901 of 4,675

miow

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Quote:
Well I've had my EPH-100's for 2 days and have about 15 hours on them and I'm really enjoying this IEM.  The bass is very well represented with pretty good depth and a nice punch and texture especially for a 6mm driver.  The mids which is my favorite part (that and the bass) right now, its very smooth and a little forward which I like as none of my other IEM's really have forward mids (well the FXT90 do to some extent).  Vocals just shine with these and they really enhance the midrange melodies and other samples in my EDM that make the tracks very fun to listen to.  The highs are detailed and clear at the same time they're smooth and never to bright or in your face.  They do get brighter when I use them with my Fuze or Sony E-series but with my i10 they sound more laid back and really a little to dull.  As for the soundstage its another strong part of the Yamahas presentation with good width and depth but like many have said they really standout with the instrument separation and the 3D effect, which I love because it makes a lot of my EDM sound very cool.
 
For only $115 (from Audio Affair) these are wonderful little IEM's that have me reaching form them now more than my others like the TF10, FXT90 and the like.  Granted you always go for the one you just got but I'm digging the sound signature of these bad boys a lot at the moment as the never get fatiguing and are quite comfortable for long listening sessions.  These makes me actually want to try the Monster Miles Davis Trumpets and I read someone say that they liked them as much or a little more than the Yamaha's but $299 seems a bit to steep of a price for them so I'll wait for that to drop some.  All in all the EPH-100 is a great IEM at its price point and thanks to all the early reviews that helped me decide to go ahead and get'em.


Interesting "brief" review and they've just 15 hours.
wink.gif
Let us know your impressions as they change (hopefully for the better, you'll notice that - deeper, tighter, more controlled bass and more clarity).
 
 
Quote:
Do you listen to any EDM? If so, grab some Deadmau5 :) You won't regret it, the EPH-100 are MADE for more chill house, ambient, etc: music that benefits from good bass and a mid-forward but not overly in-your-face sound.
 

 
Since you insist, I'm buying the complete discography ; )
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 1:35 AM Post #903 of 4,675

Gilly87

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I've definitely noticed the Yams becomimg a bit smoother and more forward, getting less mechanical as time goes on. They still aren't anywhere near as lush and full sounding as my MS400, but are about halfway to my SE215 in this regard from where they started off at. I cant say exactly how much this is an improvement from the beginning because I am the third owner, but between listening and burn in they've put on about 10 hours since I received them yesterday. Kick drums have a little more punch as well, the bass notes were sounding a little unclear at first; not muddy like the SE215 can be, but I feel like some of the bass frequencies were less prominent at first but are coming more to life now. These would make a great upgrade from the SE215 for anyone wanting something that sounds a bit more analytical but still emphasizes bass. Overall I would say they are balanced in signature overall with slightly emphasized bass. I know most people say these are forward in the mids, and although the mid volume is greater than the treble, I would say that the treble is actually positioned in front of the midrange, despite being lesser in volume, almost sneaking in ahead from the sides, whereas with my SE215 the treble came in like shots of air through the middle of the sound. I would say that the treble with the Yams does not mesh with the midrange, which can be good and shows off this phone's great ability to separate sounds, but IMO feels a little less natural, more like the W3s than the X10 or SE215 which are both smooth and blended sounding in comparison. These are good IEMs for anyone who likes a dynamic driver's ability to move air but a BAs more polite and separated sound. It's not clinical but it is very precise feeling compared to other dynamics.
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 1:39 AM Post #904 of 4,675

Gilly87

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Your impressions of their burn-in process are congruent with the small improvements I have noticed.
 
Enjoy :) Deadmau5 is a lot of fun to listen to; there's NO better word for Deadmau5, really, than FUN 
bigsmile_face.gif

 
Quote:
Interesting "brief" review and they've just 15 hours.
wink.gif
Let us know your impressions as they change (hopefully for the better, you'll notice that - deeper, tighter, more controlled bass and more clarity).
 
 
 
Since you insist, I'm buying the complete discography ; )



 
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 2:55 AM Post #906 of 4,675

Gilly87

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An interesting comparison, as the X10 and EPH100 actually each possess a lot of characteristics that are more typical of the other's driver type. The X10 is the warmer earphone, also more lush sounding, despite being a BA. Which is more detailed would be a hard call as I don't have the X10s any more but I would say they are probably close; I would say the X10 was more revealing of bad source material and more defined at the most minute edges of sound due to driver speed, but the Yamahas are more extended at both ends, particularly the upper range, and are more tonally accurate. As I said, the midrange on the x10 is more lush, and the bass is softer, without as much punch or quantity, but the notes are thicker in a way, surprisingly so for a BA. The bass is flatter on the X10s, all parts of the bass are presented with equal emphasis, whereas the Yamahas seem to have different peaks in different areas of the bass spectrum; I found the bass of the X10 really enjoyable with music like Shpongle or Infected Mushroom's album Converting vegetarians when tonal detail and texture were required, whereas the Yamahas sound better with music that requires punch and presence like Juno Reactor, Deadmau5 or any hip-hop. Soundstage is wider on the X10s, more immediately impressive, but dynamics are better on the Yamahas as is depth, aided by its distinctive separation; the X10 separates very well, as it is a BA, but they are very smooth and musical despite this. Even though note decay is longer on the Yams, they still sound more analytical in their signature because they are not as warm or colored as the X10 and don't blend the sound. I found the X10s to be very smooth despite having the characteristic precision and speed of BAs, whereas the very distinct sound separation, sometimes metallic treble, and neutral signature of the Yamahas gives them a more analytical feel than most dynamics I have heard. 
 
Quote:
Gilly87, can you please tell me more about how the EPH-100 sounds in  comparison with the X10?



 
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 4:46 AM Post #908 of 4,675

miow

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Personally I prefer better dynamics to a wider soundstage. Thats why I love these Yamahas. Anyways, soundstage is wide enough for my taste and nothing comes close to this instrument separation (nor even the UM3X - well known for huge separation). So far I'm loving them and was my best buy ever under 100€ (they cost me 90€ shipped
ksc75smile.gif
).
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 5:11 AM Post #909 of 4,675

kloan

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Still waiting for mine...... uggghhhhh........... they only JUST got prepared for being sent overseas.... man, the wait sucks.
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 6:10 AM Post #910 of 4,675

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Quote:
An interesting comparison, as the X10 and EPH100 actually each possess a lot of characteristics that are more typical of the other's driver type. The X10 is the warmer earphone, also more lush sounding, despite being a BA. Which is more detailed would be a hard call as I don't have the X10s any more but I would say they are probably close; I would say the X10 was more revealing of bad source material and more defined at the most minute edges of sound due to driver speed, but the Yamahas are more extended at both ends, particularly the upper range, and are more tonally accurate. As I said, the midrange on the x10 is more lush, and the bass is softer, without as much punch or quantity, but the notes are thicker in a way, surprisingly so for a BA. The bass is flatter on the X10s, all parts of the bass are presented with equal emphasis, whereas the Yamahas seem to have different peaks in different areas of the bass spectrum; I found the bass of the X10 really enjoyable with music like Shpongle or Infected Mushroom's album Converting vegetarians when tonal detail and texture were required, whereas the Yamahas sound better with music that requires punch and presence like Juno Reactor, Deadmau5 or any hip-hop. Soundstage is wider on the X10s, more immediately impressive, but dynamics are better on the Yamahas as is depth, aided by its distinctive separation; the X10 separates very well, as it is a BA, but they are very smooth and musical despite this. Even though note decay is longer on the Yams, they still sound more analytical in their signature because they are not as warm or colored as the X10 and don't blend the sound. I found the X10s to be very smooth despite having the characteristic precision and speed of BAs, whereas the very distinct sound separation, sometimes metallic treble, and neutral signature of the Yamahas gives them a more analytical feel than most dynamics I have heard. 
 

 
 
Cheers for the comparison.
Seems like I'll never get these yams after all, especially seeing as I hated the X10's, I can't see why people like the X10's.
 
That's just me it seems though.
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 8:54 AM Post #911 of 4,675

Gilly87

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Cheers for the comparison.
Seems like I'll never get these yams after all, especially seeing as I hated the X10's, I can't see why people like the X10's.

That's just me it seems though.


Personally I likeed the X10, if it had punchier bass and/or better extension I may have kept it. They have a really nice sound, female vocals are magical on the X10s, and I found the sign well suited to lots of my music. However they are not very multi-purpose, not at all suited to classical music. Great for R&B, pop, Indie rock, trip hop and others though. GREAT iems for commuting, on par with the yams for isolation, maybe better with double flanges which is saying a lot. Bad microphonics but can be fixed with earguides, although they are not included and make the fit awkward.
 
Feb 10, 2012 at 9:35 AM Post #915 of 4,675

Totally Dubbed

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I did find that the X10 were slightly picky about fit, they HAVE to be inserted deep and seal best in the bend in the ear canal, about as deep as IEMs should go.


Exactly that - deep insertion, felt like I was hurting my ears.
 
Oh and BTW:
Was listening to my TFTA 1Xb's on some Armin Van Buuren - man its amazing.
 
The Atrio's HAVE A LOT to live up to atm.
If I don;t like them, Atrio's are gone
 
Let's see what I prefer :)
 
 

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