Will 220V -> 120V AC Adaptor degrade the sound quality?
May 9, 2004 at 10:24 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 7

NEO

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I have Sony CDP-XA20ES (the second or third model from top of the line CDP-XA7ES). I am going back to my country in Asia and want to take it back with me. However, the player is US Spec 120V input which means I will have to use 220V to 120V AC adaptor there. Is this a good idea? Will AC adaptor (might be the cheap one) degrade the quality of the player?

NEO
 
May 10, 2004 at 8:30 PM Post #2 of 7

lini

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Will that be 220 V at 50 or 60 Hz? If it's also 60 Hz, you probably won't notice any difference as long as you avoid switching converters and go for a real transformer solution. A 100 W unit should be enough - more overdimensioning might merely result in a humming unit...

Greetings from Hannover!

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May 11, 2004 at 3:18 AM Post #4 of 7

tortie

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NEO
so...if I use small 220->120 V adapter, will it be that noticeable?


You will need a downstep 220 -> 110v transformer. No, its not noticable.
 
May 11, 2004 at 3:22 AM Post #5 of 7

Ticky

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I had the same problem when I was trying to figure out how to switch between voltages when I move back to Thailand in the coming months. This is not exactly on point, but I'm currently using my new HR-2 (220v) version on a step-up transformer here the US. I have no problems with the unit... no increased noise or sonic degradation that I could detect.

From what I've seen, most transformers do not convert cycles (60Hz vs. 50Hz). Here a statement made by one site selling such transformers:

Transformers Do Not Convert Cycles
IMPORTANT: Transformers do not convert cycles (60Hz North America vs. 50Hz foreign), and some appliances may not operate normally when used overseas. These include, but are not limited to: microwave ovens, analog clocks, motorized electric typewriters, televisions and turntables. Consult the appliance manufacturer if you have any questions.


Here's a page that tells you the types of voltages, cycles and plug types used in various countries: http://www.voltageconverters.com/voltageguide.htm#T
 
May 11, 2004 at 8:44 AM Post #6 of 7
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I looked into this a little while ago and afaik, i that it would not be the best idea ... on the basis that the step down transformers from 220->110 v

1. do not convert 60hz->50hz which may be ok for a cdp (when i enquired with toshiba about using a sd 3950 [60hz] with the 50hz electricity here they said it was ok)
2. step down tranformer may increase noise floor ?? not sure about this
3. the step down tranformers i looked had a fair amount of thd on their output but then again maybe it is possible to buy efficient converters.

but then again i could and probably am wrong.

http://www.pigtailproductions.com/st...quency-50.html = operating 60hz equipment at 50hz

one question i have: can stepdown tranformers induce hummmmmm into the rest of your system?
 
May 11, 2004 at 9:01 AM Post #7 of 7

tortie

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Quote:

Originally Posted by euphoria_attack

one question i have: can stepdown tranformers induce hummmmmm into the rest of your system?



I never had any problems with using a stepdown 220 -> 110 transformer. My washing machine, computer & almost all my audio & video equipment are all running on step-down transformers. Some have been with me for years & I have not encountered any problems with it whatsoever. But It says on the link given by ticky that we have 60hz here in the Philippines, so I may be the exception to the rule.

My current headphone gear is all running using stepdown transformers and I do not have any hum or hiss on my system.
 

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