Why would eqing not fix this problem? Can someone more knowledgeable explain this to me
Nov 10, 2015 at 12:25 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 4

mrconfuse

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So from this link
 
http://www.head-fi.org/t/649385/rwak100-iriver-ak100-mod-by-rwa/15 - high output impedance negatively effects the frequency response
 
And this is a chart of the Ak100 + Shure 425 frequency response.
 
 

 
The frequency isn't flat, and the low frequency isn't flat either. Can't I get it close to flat if i went into the eq and lower the high down 2 db? and the up the lower frequency like DB? Won't this be a suitable fix?
 
Nov 10, 2015 at 4:51 PM Post #2 of 4

NA Blur

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Applying EQ is tricky especially if doing so digitally because it often changes the phase. This colors the sound and often is heard as making the music tinny ( like being inside a tin can ). I routinely try to EQ headphones and going down a few dB here and there often works best, but apply EQ by moving frequencies up often leads to distortion. You should be able to tone down the treble for your headphones and having a good EQ program to do so is your best bet. You want over 30 bands so you can lower only the frequencies that are troublesome and not change the nearby frequencies as much. Try dropping down the 3.5kHz and 7.0 kHz signals down 3-4 dB each. If you do not have those exact frequencies just lower the closest ones. One great way to apply EQ is to use pink noise and listen for anything glaring like a peak in the bass or treble. Applying the EQ doing this can help even out the sound instead of using a track which may have emphasized bass or treble thus skewing the EQ process.
 
REFERENCES
 
http://ethanwiner.com/EQPhase.html
 
Nov 10, 2015 at 5:09 PM Post #3 of 4

mrconfuse

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  Applying EQ is tricky especially if doing so digitally because it often changes the phase. This colors the sound and often is heard as making the music tinny ( like being inside a tin can ). I routinely try to EQ headphones and going down a few dB here and there often works best, but apply EQ by moving frequencies up often leads to distortion. You should be able to tone down the treble for your headphones and having a good EQ program to do so is your best bet. You want over 30 bands so you can lower only the frequencies that are troublesome and not change the nearby frequencies as much. Try dropping down the 3.5kHz and 7.0 kHz signals down 3-4 dB each. If you do not have those exact frequencies just lower the closest ones. One great way to apply EQ is to use pink noise and listen for anything glaring like a peak in the bass or treble. Applying the EQ doing this can help even out the sound instead of using a track which may have emphasized bass or treble thus skewing the EQ process.
 
REFERENCES
 
http://ethanwiner.com/EQPhase.ht AK100  1K, 4K, 16K for high frequencies. So what I would do would lower those 3 down 2 db and then

 
The Ak100 has 3 settings for high frequencies 1K, 4k, and 16K. And 2 Settings for lower frequencies 62hz and 250hz. I would lower the hig frequencies 2 DB and then up the lower by 1 db. That shouldn't do to much damage right?
 
Nov 11, 2015 at 2:47 PM Post #4 of 4

NA Blur

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It is not about damage. It is more about changing the sound. Too much will lead to distortion which will not damage anything. It will just sound bad.
 
EQ away!
 

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