1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.

    Dismiss Notice

Why FLAC is better.

Discussion in 'Sound Science' started by juntao, Oct 20, 2009.
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Next
 
Last
  1. juntao
    Hearing the difference now isn’t the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is ‘lossy’. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA – it’s about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don’t want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

    I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange…well don’t get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren’t stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you’ll be glad you did.
     
    anetode likes this.
  2. Gbjerke
    Or u can rerip every 2nd years if your collection isnt huge. What you're saying is that if i download music... in some years left on my hard drive it will sound like ****? Sounds weird to me
     
  3. TheMarchingMule Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by juntao /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Hearing the difference now isn’t the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is ‘lossy’. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA – it’s about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don’t want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

    I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange…well don’t get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren’t stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you’ll be glad you did.




    [​IMG]
     
  4. moonboy403
    Your 320kbps mp3s sound bad because you aren't storing them in proper places. Storing them in a cool and dry place will only degrade their sound quality due to mp3's special alignment of the 1s and 0s'. They should be placed under direct sunlight whenever possible which also allows the mp3s to absorb extra warmth which gives you that extra ounce of bass we all crave.
     
  5. fatcat28037 Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by moonboy403 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Your 320kbps mp3s sound bad because you aren't storing them in proper places. Storing them in a cool and dry place will only degrade their sound quality due to mp3's special alignment of the 1s and 0s'. They should be placed under direct sunlight whenever possible which also allows the mp3s to absorb extra warmth which gives you that extra ounce of bass we all crave.



    So so true about keeping your Cd's in a warm place. I was fortunate enough to pick up a one-person sauna cheap at a Pool/Spa dealer that was going out of business. I ripped out the bench seat and lined the walls with shelves to store my collection. Since doing this 2 years ago I've noticed that my new purchases have retained 100% (!) of their original sound quality and that some of my older Cd's have improved immensely from their BS (before sauna) condition.
     
  6. ford2
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by juntao /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Hearing the difference now isn’t the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is ‘lossy’. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA – it’s about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don’t want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.

    I started collecting MP3s in about 2001, and if I try to play any of the tracks I downloaded back then, even the stuff I grabbed at 320kbps, they just sound like crap. The bass is terrible, the midrange…well don’t get me started. Some of those albums have degraded down to 32 or even 16kbps. FLAC rips from the same period still sound great, even if they weren’t stored correctly, in a cool, dry place. Seriously, stick to FLAC, you may not be able to hear the difference now, but in a year or two, you’ll be glad you did.




    You have a great future.
     
  7. krmathis Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by juntao /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    Hearing the difference now isn’t the reason to encode to FLAC. FLAC uses lossless compression, while MP3 is ‘lossy’. What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps, assuming you have SATA – it’s about 15kbps on IDE, but only 7kbps on SCSI, due to rotational velocidensity. You don’t want to know how much worse it is on CD-ROM or other optical media.



    Yeah, right! [​IMG]
    Either you are trolling and spread bull$hit, or you are very misinformed. Anyway, it is totally wrong...
     
  8. robm321
    You have to store mp3 in a cool dry place, otherwise it will wilt.
     
  9. Spaceman_Spiff
    [​IMG]

    Iz in ur computer, stealin ur bitratez.
     
  10. logwed
    *Tries to find juntao's other post; hopes it is just as funny*
     
  11. Zida
  12. Bender Rodriguez
    I use ALAC files and store them in the freezer. They have lasted over 15 years with no sound degredation this way.[​IMG]
     
  13. krmathis Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bender Rodriguez /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    I use ALAC files and store them in the freezer. They have lasted over 15 years with no sound degredation this way.[​IMG]



    Great work!
    Especially since Apple introduced ALAC (Apple Lossless) as part of QuickTime 6.5.1 on April 28, 2004. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  14. soozieq
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by juntao /img/forum/go_quote.gif
    What this means is that for each year the MP3 sits on your hard drive, it will lose roughly 12kbps



    Oh noooooooo!! So in twenty-six years... my 320kbps mp3 will be 0kbps? Will that degrade the sound at all or should I just crank up the volume????????????????? I like to plan in advance, please advise [​IMG]
     
  15. Gbjerke
    Are you saying that every mp3 file will lose 12kbs per year, or that if i have 10 mp3files, all of them will lose 120kbs each per year? And what happends when they reach 0 by the way? Do they vanish? SWOOSH?

    Either way...

    [​IMG]
     
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Next
 
Last

Share This Page