Why do you listen to vinyl?
Mar 20, 2006 at 7:30 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 25

Hellacious D

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I'd like to know why you audiophiles listen to vinyl. While I don't know much about it, I only see negatives. First of all, it surprised me that you can deal with the background noise. Secondly, doesn't vinyl get worse sounding every time you play it?(I might be completely wrong, but that's what I've been told) Lastly, can a record sound as clean and nice as a cd?
Thanks,
Jeff
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 4:46 PM Post #2 of 25

britishbane

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I listen because I find the whole experience fun. I also think that vinyl can sound better than cd. As to your surface noise questions: yes it can sound as "clean" as a cd. Most all my records have little to no noticeable surface noise. It sounds to me like you are perfectly happy with your cd's, may as well just stick with that format.
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 6:05 PM Post #3 of 25

Mercuttio

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Vinyl has that warm wonderful alive sound. CDs just don't match it. I know that if I got into Vinyl, it'd be the end of me...

There's even a turntable without a headshell and cartridge hiding under my bed, just in case... Someone buy it from me before I do something crazy!
 
Mar 20, 2006 at 10:23 PM Post #4 of 25

Ruppin

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I'd qualify more as a newbie than as an "audiophile", but I'll take a crack at this thread.

Talking to Todd convinced me that I ought to have a turntable to go with the amps and preamp I am buying (Shrimp, Mahi-Mahi: Sushi, YES). Anyway, the turntable has arrived before the amps, so I'm using it with my headphone rig. So far, I'd have to say that buying it was a great decision.

1) Having been born B.C.(D), I own say 300 records. About half of these were my parents', including some great classical recordings, and some fun popular recordings (e.g. Rat Pack). Why replace them when I own them? Most of them have proven to be in pretty good shape. I did shell out for the VPI record cleaning machine which does a great job.

2) When the records are properly cleaned, there has been a noticeable lack of background noise. The records sound wonderful. Yes, IMHO many sound better than CDs. Note, too, that early CDs of 60s and 70s classics suck. The records don't.

3) The records sound a hell of a lot better now, on new equipment, than they sounded then.

By the way, Todd was (and is) great to deal with. I got better attention than I've ever gotten at a bricks and mortar dealer. He picked equipment that I, as a non do it yourselfer could set up. He even talked my through cartridge install and adjustment. I love my Scout, and I love my lyra cartridge. Oh yeah, the Ray Samuels phono stage is great, too.

I still have all my CDs, on hard drive, airport expressed to a DAC. I'm not going to give that up, but the vinyl is an incredible treat. The new vinyl, while expensive, is even more wonderful.

Depending on where you live, there may even be a store that sells used records. You can pick up a lot of great music at $5-8.

Well, I hadn't intended to go on quite so long, but I guess I am that enthusiastic. Enough said. This might already qualify for the butt kiss thread.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 1:51 PM Post #5 of 25

Skylab

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LOTS of cool things about vinyl:

> Used records can be had for a dollar or less, making it a great way to buy music cheap

> There is a ritual to vinyl that is fun for me (scoring used records, cleaning them, playing them, etc).

> Records are way more fun to own than CDs. Nicer form factor.

> Also, there are LOTS of things available on LP that were never released on CD.

> Turntables are COOL:

gi.mpl


AND: I have to say, that records that are cleaned well (i.e. wet-vacuum cleaned) sound better than CD's in many cases on my Vinyl rig, which cost the same as my digital rig.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 2:36 PM Post #6 of 25

Oddball

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I enjoy watching the record spinning as it plays. I find it hypnotic.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 5:26 PM Post #9 of 25

Hellacious D

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I see, but how can you tell if your record is scratched? I would think the odds would be good that when you pick up a used record, it won't be in very good condition. Is there any surface noise if you buy a record new and properly take care of it?
Thanks,
Jeff
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 6:55 PM Post #10 of 25

Sleestack

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Mar 21, 2006 at 6:58 PM Post #11 of 25

Sleestack

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Hellacious D
I see, but how can you tell if your record is scratched? I would think the odds would be good that when you pick up a used record, it won't be in very good condition. Is there any surface noise if you buy a record new and properly take care of it?
Thanks,
Jeff




Every record has surface noise. Anyone who tells you otherwise is probably trying to sell you something. That being said on records that are properly handled and cleaned, it can be reduced to a point where it is insignificant for most people.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 7:01 PM Post #12 of 25

Sleestack

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Skylab
LOTS of cool things about vinyl:

> Used records can be had for a dollar or less, making it a great way to buy music cheap

> There is a ritual to vinyl that is fun for me (scoring used records, cleaning them, playing them, etc).

> Records are way more fun to own than CDs. Nicer form factor.

> Also, there are LOTS of things available on LP that were never released on CD.

> Turntables are COOL:

gi.mpl


AND: I have to say, that records that are cleaned well (i.e. wet-vacuum cleaned) sound better than CD's in many cases on my Vinyl rig, which cost the same as my digital rig.




Quick question. The table in your pic. I recently got rid of my VPI Superscoutmaster and XR-10B. I don't regret it b/c it was too much rig for the little vinyl I care about. I also gave away my Technics SL12000GLD to a friend in need. My father-in-law has that exact Denon turntable sitting in his house and has offered it to me. I've thouht about grabbing it just so I have something to spin an occasional rare record. Is that table any good?
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 7:02 PM Post #13 of 25

Sleestack

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Hellacious D
I'd like to know why you audiophiles listen to vinyl. While I don't know much about it, I only see negatives. First of all, it surprised me that you can deal with the background noise. Secondly, doesn't vinyl get worse sounding every time you play it?(I might be completely wrong, but that's what I've been told) Lastly, can a record sound as clean and nice as a cd?
Thanks,
Jeff




For every audiophile who loves it, there's one who completely hates it. You really need to listen for yourself and figure out if it's for you.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 7:26 PM Post #14 of 25

Ruppin

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Hellacious D
I see, but how can you tell if your record is scratched? I would think the odds would be good that when you pick up a used record, it won't be in very good condition. Is there any surface noise if you buy a record new and properly take care of it?
Thanks,
Jeff



Although I didn't believe it three weeks ago, I can now say that there are scratches and there are SCRATCHES. A scratch that actually gets near the bottom of a groove or grooves will ruin a record. A little one across the top is pretty meaningless. You can pretty much see how bad most scratches are just by looking. Some stores, like mine, allow you to return any record if it has issues. For the most part, older records are turning out to be better than I thought they would.

Sleestack is correct about surface noise: you can reduce it, but rarely eliminate it. It rarely bothers me and is an acceptable trade off for fidelity. If a good qualtiy new record is properly cared for, noise should be a non-issue.

CDs were a revelation to those of us who grew up with records. "Perfect, every time, forever!". Well, that's not quite true either. Records require more care, and are more effort. I believe that they can be better. Certainly, there is a place for both, especially if expense is not your primary concern. In a world where most people think that a 128 bit rate MP3 on an iPod is great sound, the CD vs. LP debate is amusing.

As far as I am concerned, getting a turntable reunited me with old friends, and surprised me with better sound than I had heard before.

Try a basic turntable (MusicHall, Rega) and an inexpensive cartridge. Like everything else audio, you can count on being able to find more expensive gear later.
 
Mar 21, 2006 at 7:43 PM Post #15 of 25

909

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Sleestack
That is extremely oversimplified and incomplete. This is another article that explains some of the misconceptions about digital audio:

http://www.audioholics.com/techtips/...gitalAudio.php



I am sorry it wasn't up to your standards.
tongue.gif
But I had thought and hoped it provided a sufficient basis for someone with a general vinyl question to help them understand or appreciate why people prefer vinyl.

I'll be taking a look at your link and thanks for ensuring that things are complete and not oversimplified.
tongue.gif
 

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