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Why do headphones sound better late at night than on the morning?

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  1. john_jcb
    I agree with what has been said about the power and noise.

    Another reason I enjoy evening listening or early morning on the weekends is my mental state. If I have nothing to do that fills my mind with extraneous thoughts I find that I enjoy the music a lot more.
     
  2. pank2002 Contributor
    It all about the small elfs inside all electronical devices. In themorning, some of them arent awake and and cant do their magic. But at night they alle awake and ready to rock
    .
    .
    .
    Maby not [​IMG]
     
  3. JMT Moderator
    For me, it is purely psychological. The mornings (which is my favorite time of day) is the time to "gear up for the day" and headphone listening is not part of that (good strong coffee is a must though). Late evening and nights are for "winding down from the day." My headphone rig, and my speaker rig as well, are a critical part of that.
     
  4. cookscreek
    I have the same problem Pace , my opion is the softer lighting of night time , must be a head thing [​IMG]
     
  5. D-EJ915
    There's also less strain on the eyes, I find music a lot more enjoyable if I'm in a dark room. It just adds to my reclusiveness [​IMG].
     
  6. Rizumu
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JMT
    For me, it is purely psychological. The mornings (which is my favorite time of day) is the time to "gear up for the day" and headphone listening is not part of that (good strong coffee is a must though). Late evening and nights are for "winding down from the day." My headphone rig, and my speaker rig as well, are a critical part of that.



    I attribute it to this as well. It's really quiet early in the morning too, before everyone's up, yet I still enjoy listening in the night more. At night, the day is over, it's dark and the world is still, you can relax in a chair and not worry about anything and just let the music take control...Mornings are the start of a new day, and time to get up and going. Very different situations.
     
  7. 10SNE1
    One other thing I note is that listening with the lights out seems to sharpen my perception of music listened through headphones.

    I would guess that is due to the brain's response to loss of visual stimulation and compensating by heightening the response to stimuli of the remaining senses, as blind people often experience.
     
  8. pbirkett
    Quote:

    Originally posted by 10SNE1
    One other thing I note is that listening with the lights out seems to sharpen my perception of music listened through headphones.

    I would guess that is due to the brain's response to loss of visual stimulation and compensating by heightening the response to stimuli of the remaining senses, as blind people often experience.



    Darkness definitely makes music sound a lot better, for the reasons you stated. I always use subdued light at the most to listen to music, makes it sound warmer. Closing your eyes is even better [​IMG]
     
  9. daycart1 Contributor
    Great consensus here! I've noticed ALL of these effects too.[​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  10. hempcamp
    Because your ears need time to break in, of course! [​IMG]

    --Chris

    (just kidding)
     
  11. TWIFOSP
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Cyntax
    Because mornings are a cruel heartless joke that are forced upon us and I will not rest until the earth is covered in a veil of darkness so that it is always night time.

    I hate mornings [​IMG]



    WORD!
     
  12. wallijonn
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Trawlerman
    I can't bloody sleep during the night yet as soon as it gets to dawn i'm zonked.



    Do you find that your hearing is as acute 1 hour after waking up or 1 hour before going to bed as if it was morning or night?

    What you describe is what I have gone through for the last two years. 2 years and still no job. I couldn't even get a job at the local supermarket.

    You probably take too many naps during the day. That and a lack of exercise, and a shifting eating schedule, will wreck your body's natural rythym. I try and get back on the horse, and I keep falling off.

    as far as listening in the dark - try some experiments with your eyes closed. I think that not only is your hearing relaxed or tired, but so is your mind. Unless you think in your sleep rather than sleep. If you think in your sleep then the rational part of the mind (right side)is still turned on and the intuition part (left part) is turned off.

    When one lives in the desert, one tends to change gears and get more done during night time hours because of lessened heat.

    I just wish frost free refrigerators were much more quiet.

    Do you also hear better when it is closer to 70 degrees than 30 or 110?
    Do you hear better when there is a lot of humidity in the air, when it's very dry, or something in the middle?
     
  13. aeowap
    I find my hearing is usually better when the temperature is between 60 and 75 degrees F. I think it's only because, otherwise, I'm too busy thinking, "It's too hot," or, "It's too cold." I can handle dryness without any problem but I am NOT a happy camper if it's humid. I can't really enjoy music then. Instead, I'll just lay that whimpering like I just had a toe hacked off with a spoon or something. It's pathetic really. [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  14. strooper
    I have the same "problem."   My setup is all battery, so it isn't powerline noise.  And it's not outside noise: my house is quiet as can be in the morning and at night.  By noon I want to sell my earphones.  But later that night I fall in love with them again.  For me it has a lot to do with how I perceive high frequencies.  In the am they seem overemphasized and tiring.  In the pm they seem better balanced.  
     
    Given what's been said above, I think the idea of ear fatigue makes sense.  Maybe my ability to hear the high frequencies drops and what sounded shrill earlier in the day just doesn't reach my brain in the pm.
     
  15. roladyzator
    I second that, the music sounds cleaner and more lifelike late at night, also on battery powered devices.
    Maybe this is evolutionary - similar to differences in light perception at day vs night:
     
    Scotopic-Photopis-lumens-copy.png
    What if we also hear differently e.g. to detect danger late at night?
     
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