WHOA. a very easy and effective way of tinning boards!
Mar 26, 2006 at 5:05 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 6

joostoo

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Mar 26, 2006 at 6:22 PM Post #3 of 6

mono

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The article's final conclusion to use a match is a bit vague, subject to variables in reproduction of the technique. I have also occasionally used plumber's flux to tin boards but I used a regular torch on low and/or a pencil torch. The first tries resulted in the edges of boards being scorched but with more patience (torch further away and longer heating) and a lower setting it worked ok. I had used silver bearing paste though, it's higher melting point is more of a challenge. You have to be sure to thoroughly wash off the remaining flux, some is fairly active and not good to leave on the board. Some is in a petroleum jelly-like base and needs LOTS of detergent to remove it.
 
Mar 26, 2006 at 11:30 PM Post #5 of 6

Garbz

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No it looks like it may just be that simple. Although I still greatly prefer lacquering the PCB after etching. It can be soldered through, is non-corrosive, prevents oxidation, prevents flux from interfeering with signals, oh and looks good too
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Mar 27, 2006 at 1:48 AM Post #6 of 6

mono

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Hard, no, but how far does one hold a match away? Where do we find a match that burns such a long time else we need a few boxes and a ventilator, or how much time per each sq. cm? What is the exact composition of the flux (metal, it's melting point) for these figures. What orientation is the board to the match, below it or to the side or upside down or ?

Getting it to melt is easy enough. Applying uniform heat that is high enough to melt the solder but not hot enough to discolor the board is one of the issues. Another is his base board, FR1 stripboard was discolored in the oven but without any testing to determine if the traces then lift off easier (worse), or if the board is now brittle, weren't mentioned. Glass epoxy board might not turn dark, as the darkness might be due to the board itself absorbing some of the flux. If it did that and was a fairly active flux, the traces might even lift off later while they seem good at the moment.

Lacquering is good too, it doesn't have to be one or the other instead of both.
 

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