Which type of glue to use?
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mengshi

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I’m thinking of doing a DIY repair of my headphone driver which is damaged due to age. The drivers are on their way.

May I know which type of glue is suitable for gluing the new driver in place after I removed the old one?

Thx.
 
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mengshi

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Goldring DR-150. 40mm 32 ohm. Typical ones. Not original of course. Damaged because uneven sound and when I ran the frequency sweep it crackles and beeps at certain frequency.

i am an adult. Lol.
 
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mengshi

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Goldring DR-150. 40mm 32 ohm. Typical ones. Not original of course. Damaged because uneven sound and when I ran the frequency sweep it crackles and beeps at certain frequency.

i am an adult. Lol.
theyre 7 years old. Out of production
 
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ScornDefeat

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Goldring DR-150. 40mm 32 ohm. Typical ones. Not original of course. Damaged because uneven sound and when I ran the frequency sweep it crackles and beeps at certain frequency.

i am an adult. Lol.
Loctite is typically easy to work with; any of their multipurpose products should work, such as the Go2Glue, should be sufficient.
 
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Johnny Golden

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Was just about to reply suggesting Go2Glue.
I'm not completely familiar with this specific headphone however depending on the mounting and as long as you are careful I often use hot glue if I need more physical substance rather than just to stick something to something else.
 
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mengshi

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Ok. Will try some temporary measures first before I cement it.
 
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fefrie

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Always a big fan of Goop.

Workable in about 30min, but overnight sticks anything to anything, and 100% removable.

Huge con is that it's thick and sticky, and starts to skin very quickly within 5 minutes.
 
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myanime002

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It depends on what materials are being adhered together and what their properties are: rigid, pourous, flexible plastic glue, wood, paper, fabric, metal, etc. Different adhesives stick better to some surfaces than others. In general, epoxy resin with metal powder added is extremely hard and durable in and of itself, but it all depends on the application so it might be perfect or completely unsuitable for your use.
 
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