When you came out...
Apr 16, 2009 at 6:36 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 19

logwed

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This is kind of a multiple impressions thread.

First, aimed at newbs like myself, what did you think of expensive audio equipment when you first learned about it?

When did you first realize that you were an 'audiophile?'

What do your friends and family think of you being an 'audiophile?'

I was looking for a set of full sized cans and doing some research, and learned about amps... setups that cost more than $1000 blew my mind.
I think of myself as an audiophile only in that I am very intrigued by audio equipment and music. I certainly don't have the income to be a 'real' audiophile.
My friends make fun of me about it. And they think that I'm stupid to lust after amps and such. They know nothing...
beyersmile.png
My family is... supportive. They always ask me if I want money for a new pair of cans or an amp come birthday or Christmas time.
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 6:57 PM Post #3 of 19

adanac061

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......Audiophiles and metaphysical philosophers aren't searching for the same things, but they work from a common assumption. As Hegel and Harry Pearson say, there's always something better, something beyond what we know, that outstrips our words and imaginations. Hegel strained to understand the Absolute, but knew he'd never get there; audiophiles constantly improve their systems in an endless quest for sonic realism. Both have a lot of faith that the next insight or the next bigger and better piece of equipment will bring them closer to the elusive goal.

As for me, I'm waiting for the next generation of speakers to arrive. They'll have even greater virtues than the PipeDreams. I'll be able to afford them, for starters, and they'll fit nicely in my listening room. They'll even improve the performance of my other components, make my life more fulfilling, and bring true love and world peace. The dream loudspeaker has arrived, but I'm still dreaming. I must be incurable.

Back at my shrink's, it had been a big day:

"George, based on our many sessions together, I'm ready to offer my expert diagnosis: You are suffering from the complex known as Audiophilia nervosa."

I sat up on the couch and wheeled around.

"And your point is...? Of course I have Audiophilia nervosa. Six years of therapy and you're telling me the obvious?!? Jeez, Doc. With all the money I've paid you over the years, I might as well have bought the PipeDreams..."

A guilty smile crept across his face.

"It really is a great speaker system," he confessed.

-Stereophile
"Audiophilia Nervosa"
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 7:01 PM Post #4 of 19

logwed

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Quote:

Originally Posted by adanac061 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
......Audiophiles and metaphysical philosophers aren't searching for the same things, but they work from a common assumption. As Hegel and Harry Pearson say, there's always something better, something beyond what we know, that outstrips our words and imaginations. Hegel strained to understand the Absolute, but knew he'd never get there; audiophiles constantly improve their systems in an endless quest for sonic realism. Both have a lot of faith that the next insight or the next bigger and better piece of equipment will bring them closer to the elusive goal.

As for me, I'm waiting for the next generation of speakers to arrive. They'll have even greater virtues than the PipeDreams. I'll be able to afford them, for starters, and they'll fit nicely in my listening room. They'll even improve the performance of my other components, make my life more fulfilling, and bring true love and world peace. The dream loudspeaker has arrived, but I'm still dreaming. I must be incurable.

Back at my shrink's, it had been a big day:

"George, based on our many sessions together, I'm ready to offer my expert diagnosis: You are suffering from the complex known as Audiophilia nervosa."

I sat up on the couch and wheeled around.

"And your point is...? Of course I have Audiophilia nervosa. Six years of therapy and you're telling me the obvious?!? Jeez, Doc. With all the money I've paid you over the years, I might as well have bought the PipeDreams..."

A guilty smile crept across his face.

"It really is a great speaker system," he confessed.

-Stereophile
"Audiophilia Nervosa"




lollerz
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 7:14 PM Post #5 of 19

Uncle Erik

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I had early influences. A grade school friend's father was an audiophile. We were allowed to look as much as we wanted without touching. And we didn't - the stuff was seriously cool and he'd play it for us now and then. Further compounding things, I took up an instrument at nine and was frequently taken to classical performances by my aunt and uncle. Even worse, my cousin is a lifelong hardcore vinyl freak with something like 8,000 records. Putting it even further, another uncle was a serious ham radio guy who built his own radio gear. I also took electronics in high school and enjoyed it. You can draw the lines between those dots easily.

I built speakers in high school and had always cared about good audio. What really pushed it over the edge was finding a nifty old Philco Transitone in a junk shop (another passion - I do woodwork and all my furniture are antiques I found in poor condition (dirt cheap) and restored myself) and thought, 'I can fix this.' I took it home and did fix it. That led to more radios, multiband radios, an amateur radio license, and the realization that I could build or restore hi-fi gear, too. The gear that pushed me over the edge were the Verhagen Ribbons. I found the plans in AudioXpress and had no idea what I was in for when I fired them up the first time. They have a freaky realism that made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. That, of course, led to more interest and more gear.

Headphones bit in 2005 when I got some audio catalog and the HD-650 caught my eye. I ordered a pair to upgrade from my Sony MDR-V6 (that I'd had for years) and a Creek OBH-11. That sounded so good, I went on the Internet to see if anyone else liked headphones. You can see what happened from there.

My family doesn't know what a lot of the stuff costs, but they are supportive. Most of them have headphones I've given them. My father never seemed interested, but had snuck off with mom's iGrados the other day. Last night, he went on and on about how good they sounded. So now he wants Grados for Father's Day. The parents also recently talked me out of the ESS AMT-1 speakers. They don't really know what they are, but love them to pieces. They'll turn the TV off and listen to music for hours.

If your friends and family isn't entirely supportive, start giving them inexpensive pairs of Grados for birthdays and holidays. Don't make a big deal out of them. They'll usually say they've never heard of them, so just tell them to give them a listen. They'll come back raving in a week or two. It's fun to see people get turned on to the good stuff.
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 7:34 PM Post #6 of 19

milkweg

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Being an audiophile is cool and all until you get to the point where you spend money on items that garner you little gain, or none at all, at very high cost. Then you enter the realm of idiophile/tweako nut and your friends ridiculing you is fully warranted.
wink.gif
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 9:20 PM Post #7 of 19

GlendaleViper

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I was introduced to audio-as-hobby (and the associated price tags) around when I was 8. I had a friend whose grandfather was a serious stereo nut, with a system worth well over $100K. I inherited my dad's old stereo as a kid, which is when I got stuck on vinyl the first time and, I also picked up guitar fairly young, which really opened my eyes to tubes.

So, there's never been much hope for me. I keep it to myself mostly though. My dad does like to hear the goodies, my mom could care less and neither wants to see me spending money on the stuff. My friends (mostly) think I'm crazy and, aside from that, their tastes in music is generally very shallow anyway. That's why we're here, isn't it? Loner outcasts, lunatic fringe, collecting in a love huddle held together by oxygen free copper?
 
Apr 16, 2009 at 10:14 PM Post #8 of 19

zotjen

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When I first became aware of this world, my first purchase was the Grado 325 (classic silver). At the time, I thought $295 was a lot of money and couldn't fathom anyone buying the RS-1. Of course, I now own an RS-1 along with some other cans, and I've also gone through numerous amps and sources and I'm considering getting the Senn HD800. At this point, cost wise, nothing surprises me but I do have my own limitations of what I'm willing to spend.

As Uncle Erik said, my family doesn't really know how much I've spent on my gear. They would probably cringe if I told them I spent $800 on an amp, but nobody blinked when my brother spent $1200 on a new lens for his camera.
 
Apr 17, 2009 at 12:22 AM Post #9 of 19

Drag0n

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You spend $1200 on a big screen tv,and nobody says a word.
That same person buys a cheap $199 surround sound system for it.
Pleasure the eyes,your ears dont matter.

If you spend $1200 on a stereo system though,,youre insane.
 
Apr 17, 2009 at 12:41 AM Post #11 of 19

logwed

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Drag0n /img/forum/go_quote.gif
You spend $1200 on a big screen tv,and nobody says a word.
That same person buys a cheap $199 surround sound system for it.
Pleasure the eyes,your ears dont matter.

If you spend $1200 on a stereo system though,,youre insane.



Never really thought of it that way, but it's verrryyy true. My friend spent $2000 on a gaming computer, and people don't think that his purchases are stupid.
 
Apr 17, 2009 at 2:42 AM Post #12 of 19

Suntory_Times

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Quote:

Originally Posted by logwed /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Never really thought of it that way, but it's verrryyy true. My friend spent $2000 on a gaming computer, and people don't think that his purchases are stupid.


If anything there more stupid. Buy a $2000 gaming computer and in a few years you'll have to replace it. Purchase a quality headphone like the he60 and you'll never need a new headphone (unless you just want something different or get the he90). At he very least you don't have to upgrade your headphones to be able to listen to the latest music (unlike games and to a lesser extent movies).
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Apr 17, 2009 at 2:58 AM Post #13 of 19

randerson3024

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My father turned me on to high end when I was a kid. I resisted two things over the years; the transition from analogue to CD, and then expensive power cables. While I agree that cables and accessories are overpriced, I pay for them anyway to get maximum performance from my equipment. I now need to become open minded regarding computers as a source, and plan on doing so, and keeping an open mind, as this is obviously the future.
 

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