What does the word "pop" mean to you?
Jul 8, 2007 at 7:54 AM Post #16 of 83

Jubei

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Alternative is a word I mostly came across when in the US. Before that I knew the genre mainly as Indie i.e. independent label music. I suppose Alternative therefore is alternative to mainstream label music. Of course, many independent labels are now owned by the big corporations.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 10:09 AM Post #18 of 83

Rempert

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DrBenway /img/forum/go_quote.gif
So Nirvana, The Carpenters, Public Enemy, and Sinatra are all "pop" musicians? I'm still wondering what this means.


All of their music is a part of popular culture, so in the broad sense they are certainly all pop musicians.

The opposite of a pop musician would be a musician whose audience always wears dresses or ties. Or else a musician who has no audience.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 1:31 PM Post #19 of 83

Jeff Guidry

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Quote:

Originally Posted by soundboy /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Pop music is just a "blanket term" describing music that is made to appeal to as many people as possible. It could be in various musical styles and it can be excellent music as well.


This is basically my definition, though I would add the qualifier that "pop" music as a rule attempts to make palatability its primary concern, rather than artistic merit. Lyrics tend to express emotions in ways that most people can understand, rather than using more dense/less immediate wordplay, and music tends to be simple and follow previously successful trends, rather than creating more complex or original structures.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 1:55 PM Post #21 of 83

jsaliga

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From AMG:

"In a broad sense, pop is any music based on memorable melodies, repeated sections (usually, but not always, verses and choruses), and a tight, concise structure that keeps the listener's focus on those elements. Pop music has been a profitable industry in America since the 19th century, but for these purposes, pop is a style that took shape in the post-rock & roll era, once the more conservative elements of the record industry had come to terms with the new musical landscape. Pop emerged in the late '50s, as the initial rock & roll craze began to die down, and a lighter, smoother (but still similar) alternative to rock was needed. Mostly a singles medium, pop was influenced by the beat, arrangements, and style of rock & roll (and sometimes doo wop), and it didn't sound bad on the radio next to rock & roll. But pop didn't rock as much as rock & roll. It was about professional craft, both in the songwriting and the studio production, and had little to do with the edge or attitude of rock. As the '60s wore on, pop began to incorporate touches of psychedelia and blue-eyed soul; by the '70s, pop had mellowed substantially, thanks in part to the singer/songwriter movement and Bacharach's brand of smooth adult pop. Some of pop's biggest acts in the '60s included the Beach Boys, the Four Seasons, the Everly Brothers (entering a different phase of their career), the Association, the Rascals, the Righteous Brothers, and (in the U.K.) the Walker Brothers and Petula Clark; other major figures included composer Burt Bacharach, producer Phil Spector, and Brill Building songwriting teams like Barry/Greenwich and Goffin/King. The classic '60s-style strain of pop morphed into AM pop and soft rock by the mid-'70s, but today it dominates good-time oldies radio formats."

I don't see a problem. The fact that DrBenway doesn't care for the term doesn't alter its utility in discussing music for the overwhelming majority of music fans. Sorry, but I see this thread nothing more than picking nits.

--Jerome
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 3:42 PM Post #22 of 83

Jeff Guidry

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jsaliga /img/forum/go_quote.gif
The fact that DrBenway doesn't care for the term


When did DrBenway say he didn't care for the term? He started this thread to gather what people defined "pop" as, because he did not see a consistent definition being utilized, not because he didn't like the term.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 4:45 PM Post #23 of 83

jsaliga

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DrBenway
My point is that the term "pop" is lazy and meaningless. Still think so, after reading these posts.


Quote:

Originally Posted by DrBenway
Yep, another abusively bad term. Before alternative was alternative, back in the 80s, new rock/electronic mucic was called "new music."


If he thinks of "Alternative" as 'another' abusively bad term (in reference to Pop) then I think it is fair to say that he doesn't care for the term.

Pretty soon someone is going to chime in and argue that it all depends on what the meaning of the word "is" is...

--Jerome
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 6:54 PM Post #25 of 83

barrycro

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i think pop or popular music was once just that. accessible to a majority of listeners, supported ( or made popular) by radio. think hermans hermits, dave clark 5, the beatles back in the 60s.

now that style is being imitated by many indie bands and to me that is pop or indie pop. but the real pop music of our time is justin timberlake, christina aguilera, gwen stefani, etc.

just my opinion.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 7:42 PM Post #26 of 83

Gatticus

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Yea, but that Gwen Stefani song "What You Waiting For" would have been considered underground New Wave back in the late '70's or early '80's. It sounds a lot like Lene Lovich to me. It's taken the masses only 30 years to catch up to what I was listening to back then.
 
Jul 8, 2007 at 11:56 PM Post #27 of 83

Zarathustra19

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Pop = popular music = unfortunately mostly crap right now
frown.gif
 
Jul 9, 2007 at 1:12 AM Post #29 of 83

s m @

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I think the problem with the term 'Pop Music' is that it has at least three distinct meanings that I know of, and when people kind of mix and match between them when using the term, it is rendered meaningless. The ones I know of are:

1. Referring to an actual style of music (simple, catchy) as described in that AMG quote above.
2. 'Popular Music'. Referring to... basically how popular music is, regardless of genre/style. For instance, the Billboard Pop Charts do not refer to any style of music, it seems that anything qualifies if it sells enough to make it.
3. This is what I'd call the 'old English guy' definition. Many may be unfamiliar with it, but I can assure you it exists within a certain segment of the population. This defines 'Pop Music' as anything that is not Classical, Jazz, or ethnic music. The music of the masses, if you will. People who observe this definition don't know or care about any stylistic divisions within it.

I think the frustrating thing for anyone who cares about these definitions (so not me) is that there's quite a bit of overlap between these definitions, but they diverge enough that you'll eventually get confused unless everyone keeps in mind exactly what they're really talking about. Like when referring to the latest rap song as a pop song. Is it? According to 2 and 3, but not 1 necessarily. But if you started thinking about that rap song in the context of some indie rock band that is supposed to have a 'pop influence', there's really no connection there at all. I think that's the kind of thing that the OP is getting at.
 
Jul 9, 2007 at 1:33 AM Post #30 of 83

Gatticus

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I was in a pub one night and had New Order's "Get Ready" cd in my pocket so asked them to play it for me, which they did. A girl of about 20 came up to me and said, so, you like pop music. Since when is New Order considered pop music?
 

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