What does PRAT stand for?
Aug 30, 2010 at 9:50 PM Post #2 of 16

revolink24

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Pace, rhythm, and timing.
 
I hate that acronym. Why use an acronym that 4 people on this board know, and the rest have to ask, when you can just type it out...
 
Aug 30, 2010 at 9:52 PM Post #4 of 16

Kirosia

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Pace, Rhythm, and Time and relative dimension(s) in space
 
Aug 30, 2010 at 10:34 PM Post #6 of 16

KnightK

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Quote:
Pace, Rhythm, and Time and relative dimension(s) in space


or in short Pace, Rhythm, and TARDIS!
biggrin.gif

 
Aug 31, 2010 at 3:34 AM Post #8 of 16

Landis

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Quote:
Pace, rhythm, and timing.
 
I hate that acronym. Why use an acronym that 4 people on this board know, and the rest have to ask, when you can just type it out...


I think four people is under exaggerating a bit! It has been on the Wiki (previously sticky) for a while!
 
Describing Sound Glossary
 
Aug 31, 2010 at 8:09 AM Post #9 of 16

El_Doug

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PRaT supposedly stands for "pace, rhythm, and timing," however there is no transducer that I know of that can possibly get the pace wrong, unless your turntable or tape motors are constantly changing speed - certainly not due to any amps or cans. 
 
PRaT, in my experience, REALLY stands for a strong and fast mid-bass, which is the tonal range responsible for the "toe-tapping," and giving music a sense that it is following a particularly strong beat
 
Aug 31, 2010 at 8:35 AM Post #10 of 16

leeperry

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PRaT supposedly stands for "pace, rhythm, and timing," however there is no transducer that I know of that can possibly get the pace wrong, unless your turntable or tape motors are constantly changing speed - certainly not due to any amps or cans. 
 
PRaT, in my experience, REALLY stands for a strong and fast mid-bass, which is the tonal range responsible for the "toe-tapping," and giving music a sense that it is following a particularly strong beat

 
Well, some phones are faster than others...I've heard the T50RP, I fully understand why most of them sell them quickly after the euphoric moment of the woody/leather earpads...its drivers are slooooooow and nothing's gonna change that.
 
You used to own a R10, you know what PraT is...and yes, you have a strong point: PRaT requires very fast drivers and a strong mid-bass! That many headphones lack.
 
Aug 31, 2010 at 11:02 AM Post #11 of 16

revolink24

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Quote:
I think four people is under exaggerating a bit! It has been on the Wiki (previously sticky) for a while!
 
Describing Sound Glossary


I was exaggerating, but my point stands.
 
Also, what is with the concept of "speed?" If drivers did not all move at the same "speed" the result would be your music is literally out of tune.
 
I don't understand how the concept of speed is always applied to transient response.
 
Sep 1, 2010 at 11:28 AM Post #15 of 16

MaZa

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Quote:
PRaT supposedly stands for "pace, rhythm, and timing," however there is no transducer that I know of that can possibly get the pace wrong, unless your turntable or tape motors are constantly changing speed - certainly not due to any amps or cans. 
 
PRaT, in my experience, REALLY stands for a strong and fast mid-bass, which is the tonal range responsible for the "toe-tapping," and giving music a sense that it is following a particularly strong beat


 
 
True. What "timing", and PRaT generally means is actually decay in bass I guess, with some exciting coloring added to rest of the sound. Grados are known as quite "PRaTty".
 

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