what are your thoughts on when your favorite band/artist/musician sells out to make more money?
Jun 8, 2011 at 1:45 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 48

bcasey25raptor

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ok to get a feel for who is in this community lets see what our opinions on this matter are. personally it annoys me when it happens but i could always listen to their older recordings. i know lots of metalheads freak out when their favorite band changes style even though the same thing every album can get boring. i think bands should always change their style a little bit but don't go to far to make more money. your thoughts?
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 11:34 AM Post #2 of 48

Sumpfkraut

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I don't have any peculiar feelings about it, I just stop buying their new records in case their new style doesn't appeal to me and enjoy the old ones.
 
I mean it's pretty sad if I can't find something else to listen to in the whole world anyway, isn't it? There are lots of good artist to listen to instead of new albums of the ever same.
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 12:14 PM Post #3 of 48

bcasey25raptor

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Quote:
I don't have any peculiar feelings about it, I just stop buying their new records in case their new style doesn't appeal to me and enjoy the old ones.
 
I mean it's pretty sad if I can't find something else to listen to in the whole world anyway, isn't it? There are lots of good artist to listen to instead of new albums of the ever same.



ya there is a whole world of music. most of my music comes from europe to be honest.
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 12:54 PM Post #4 of 48

Long813

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If the music ends up being garbage I'll dislike it, otherwise, I can't judge.
 
RHCP seems to be one band that selled out, in a good way. Although I loved their first few albums of heavy funk, when they changed to more mainstream music, they became huge, but their music was still good - just different. Now Stadium Arcadium is a different thing...
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 1:18 PM Post #5 of 48

tru blu

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I dunno…it all depends on what role music plays in someone's life. There was a time when music's social and political implications were more indicative of real frissons or changes in the culture, so folks seemed more comfortable looking to music for suggestions about how to feel about stuff. I don't get the sense that's so much the case anymore because of the realization (in Western societies, at least) that music can only be "suggestive"; sounds may attract or repel, but they can't really change the world or anything. Now they're merely the soundtrack to your or somebody else's life, so there may not be the same sense of betrayal when a favorite group moves on to something else. There's always something else to get with in the genre you dig.
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 1:31 PM Post #6 of 48

bcasey25raptor

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i think that music is still important amongst some people and people like me who follow bands from their infancy get annoyed when they completely disregard their fan bass and try becoming a mainstream band to make more money. even if it's not their style. i think bands like nightwish and children of bodom come to mind. in flames is also a good mention. 
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 1:42 PM Post #7 of 48

Ynoskire

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I agree with Tru Blu. Every time I talk to my dad / uncle about music they're always talking about the "important matters" discussed in the music and what change they believed music to have made. Whilst I really don't care about what a certain artist says in the media or what his/her beliefs are. I only care wether their music is good or not.
 
 
OT:
No, not at all, but then again I don't have a favorite band/artist/musician.
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 4:59 PM Post #8 of 48

Sordel

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I've heard a lot over the years about bands or performers "selling out", but I actually don't believe that they do. I don't think anyone in music thinks: "if I put out some music I have no faith in whatsoever then I can get a bigger audience." I think that there are times when performers make bad career decisions based on short-term commercial factors, but I still think that they often convince themselves that there's an artistic benefit as well.
 
I think fans often call something a sellout because they don't like the new direction and it happens to coincide with wider success ... but isn't it just as frequent for an artist to take an unpopular new direction and lose sales overall? When Joni Mitchell went from Court and Spark to her jazzier albums such as Mingus, was she suffering from an attack of conscience, or is it just that performers change and can't always anticipate what it will do for their careers?
 
Moreover, are there really performersout there who aspire to reach a smaller audience? I can think of a couple offhand (Scott Walker and David Sylvian) but they're very much the exception.
 
Jun 8, 2011 at 6:17 PM Post #10 of 48

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For years I loved Neil Young not just for his every man's music and his ever changing, even if his record company's hated it.  He is the ultimate non sell out.  But I dislike the Eagles because they single handedly started these outrageous concert ticket prices.  I don't care if you make a commercial, but let's not rape the fans.
 
Jun 9, 2011 at 4:12 PM Post #11 of 48

Redcarmoose

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Seems like I saw more of it in the 70s. I always just thought it was a natural progression for an artist to do. He or she starts out with a group of songs from the heart, makes a record. If you have ever tried to write music it can be tough, so the artist just gets caught up in the practical side of things and his old style gets lost for a new repackaged style which he has been convinced is great.
 
The flip side of this is many bands get their style changed and through a great producer/mentor/creator the best stuff gets produced. Two records come to mind which are over produced " sell-outs" which became classics.
 
KISS- Destroyer
Metallica- Metallica (known as the black album)
 
Maybe we have the best of both worlds here? The albums showcased the latent natural talent always inside the artists. The combo of production and artist transcended the limits of both involved and we have great music. It is all about musical ideas, where ever they come from, as long as they work.
 
Still it seems we end up with two groups of fans. One group likes the original sound, the second the over produced one. The Black Album made by Metallica is a great example. Some say it is a sell out and some say it is the best. I guess it is all in your point of view.
 
Jun 9, 2011 at 7:41 PM Post #12 of 48

bcasey25raptor

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Quote:
Seems like I saw more of it in the 70s. I always just thought it was a natural progression for an artist to do. He or she starts out with a group of songs from the heart, makes a record. If you have ever tried to write music it can be tough, so the artist just gets caught up in the practical side of things and his old style gets lost for a new repackaged style which he has been convinced is great.
 
The flip side of this is many bands get their style changed and through a great producer/mentor/creator the best stuff gets produced. Two records come to mind which are over produced " sell-outs" which became classics.
 
KISS- Destroyer
Metallica- Metallica (known as the black album)
 
Maybe we have the best of both worlds here? The albums showcased the latent natural talent always inside the artists. The combo of production and artist transcended the limits of both involved and we have great music. It is all about musical ideas, where ever they come from, as long as they work.
 
Still it seems we end up with two groups of fans. One group likes the original sound, the second the over produced one. The Black Album made by Metallica is a great example. Some say it is a sell out and some say it is the best. I guess it is all in your point of view.

i love the black album.
 
 
 
Jun 19, 2011 at 12:56 PM Post #14 of 48

roadcykler

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First of all, who decides what defines a sell out? Is it simply going in a different direction musically? Is it allowing a song to be used in a TV commercial? Does letting JayZ sample part of your song = sell out? Musicians are just like the rest of us and their tastes and influences change. If a band like Metallica continued making the same type of music that was on Kill 'Em All they likely wouldn't have gotten nearly as popular, made nearly as much money, and many of us would have never heard about them. But they evolved and their music became much more accessible to a much wider audience which is a good thing, imo. 
 
 
 
Jun 19, 2011 at 1:05 PM Post #15 of 48

caracara08

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so.. say in our cases:
 
we are entry level, boss says we can be management and make a ton of money, but you gotta control the other entry level ppl (selling out according to your piers).  just say the word and youre rich. how many of you would really say, nah im a man of the people and im happy making my X dollars a year.  take your millions and shove it.
dont blame them, blame society for making ppl sell out.
 

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