What a long, strange trip it's been -- (Robert Hunter)
Aug 1, 2016 at 7:23 PM Post #886 of 14,074

czrtly

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Another one here thankful of the multibit trickling down to the Bifrost, first sound for my 2 channel rig were the Polovtsian dances from Prince Igor (Borodin), just that little bit of that opera to hear what it could do with that chorus and the orchestra playing like no tomorrow... The GF was so taken back that she nearly stood to clap, it was really awesome. For Gorecky I have it with Ingrid Perruche (Naive) that was the only one available to me at the time, I heard a performance of this one at Bellas Artes in Mexico City, and it has been for me one of the most moving experiences.
 
Aug 1, 2016 at 9:55 PM Post #888 of 14,074

AndreYew

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I love some of the 2nd Viennese stuff, like Webern's op.6 for orchestra. It's almost like musical pointillism, and in many ways the logical conclusion to what Mahler started with his isolated chamber-like sections in his big symphonies. The contrast between the large scale orchestration and the small chamber sections in a Mahler symphony is a really nice test for an audio system BTW.
 
Another way to enjoy the 2nd Viennese School is to listen to their transcriptions of Bach, Brahms, Mahler, etc. The Mahler stuff is really interesting to me, and there are two fantastic modern recordings (in really excellent sound) from Dorian of the Schoenberg transcription of Das Lied von der Erde, complete with turn-of-the-century rubati and string slides, and the 4th symphony, also played in the same style. Conducted by the Kenneth Slowik, the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society's players all use the Smithsonian's collection of Strads and other instruments to play this music. The Schoenberg Das Lied is actually available in several recordings, and they're all worth hearing, but the 4th symphony is pretty rare.
 
I love John Adams as well, and the textures he writes for his orchestration is really phenomenal, and a big challenge for any audio system to reproduce. They all live in the upper midrange and treble with lots of struck percussion, and heard live, they form a kind of atmospheric texture that I haven't really heard reproduced well over any system. His Dharma at Big Sur has a great example of this.
 
Aug 1, 2016 at 10:50 PM Post #889 of 14,074

ThePianoMan

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I love some of the 2nd Viennese stuff, like Webern's op.6 for orchestra. It's almost like musical pointillism,

Another way to enjoy the 2nd Viennese School is to listen to their transcriptions of Bach, Brahms, Mahler, etc.

I love John Adams as well, and the textures he writes for his orchestration is really phenomenal, and a big challenge for any audio system to reproduce. They all live in the upper midrange and treble with lots of struck percussion, and heard live, they form a kind of atmospheric texture that I haven't really heard reproduced well over any system.


I think Webern was actually a tremendous romantic, and instead of "points" of music, Webern is creating a total absence of ornamentation, and wants us to focus on hearing an extended and very romantic, expressive musical line. Actually the idea of Weberns music as pointillistic comes from a French/English theorists Mis-translation of the German word "punkt" which was used by a German critic to mean "punctuated" or without ornamentation, rather than pointillist.
Weberns Op. 21 and 22 are great examples of this.

The Schoenberg orchestrations of Brahms pieces are absolutely sublimely beautiful, and well worth hearing. These guys were hugely capable and well educated composers and theorists in the late romantic tradition. Might check out Britten's "The Poison Tree" or Milton Babbit. I personally Love Messiaen as well.

Having played a lot of minimalist music, the percussive and syncopated piano writing in that genre is incredible. It makes the piano ring like a bell across its entire range. You stop hearing fundamentals and just hear overtones and ringing string notes rubbing against each other. It's one of my favorite parts about piano, and learning for example Hallelujah Junction, China Gares and Phrygian gates really took my relationship with piano to a level that even technical music like Liszt, Chopin, and Rachmaninov could not. You truly love the sound of instruments when you experience that kind of "writing for overtones." It's phenomenally difficult to record those sounds (speaking from personal experiences attempting to capture them while recording myself and others, and playing for others) systems with extreme purity of sound are required, as are extremely good mics and a nice room. Still hard to capture that beautiful pulsing sound.

You might like Darcy James Argue, or Maria Schneider who are doing some very cool things with minimalism fused with big band and folk music. Eight Blackbirds new album Hand Eye is very minimalist-leaning, I think a lot of contemporary composers are turning to a new kind of accessibility while not compromising complexity. Very cool.
Glad to see a fellow contemporary classical appreciators on headfi : )
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 7:01 AM Post #892 of 14,074

castleofargh

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  I would alike to hear Mike's take on the following concert tour:
 
http://arstechnica.com/the-multiverse/2016/04/waving-glow-sticks-at-hologram-anime-pop-stars-our-night-with-hatsune-miku/

her real name is Sharon Apple and she will revolt.
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 7:20 AM Post #893 of 14,074
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  I would alike to hear Mike's take on the following concert tour:
 
http://arstechnica.com/the-multiverse/2016/04/waving-glow-sticks-at-hologram-anime-pop-stars-our-night-with-hatsune-miku/

 
As I have reported elsewhere in this thread, I view my mission as a creator of audio equipment to be for the reproduction of music. I define reproduction as a recreation of events which have their genus directly creating acoustic energy. This is not only unplugged instruments and human voices, but, for example, Les Pauls or Telecasters played through Marshall stacks as well. (Among many other similar examples.)
 
Electronica, computer generated voices, etc. are generated synthetically by computers, and have no consistent acoustic definition. This leads to a dilemma - how does one objectively reproduce such artificial content.
 
It is not as simple that I don’t give a flying phuc about this latter category of artificially generated electronica (which for the most part I do not). It is just that I have no idea how to reproduce something not acoustically generated. Most customers of our products report their satisfaction with our gear for such content.  Perhaps this says that audio reproduction design goals are in order for artificial music.
 
Granted, I can understand that some of you may take from these comments that I am snobbish and condescending to such undefined acoustic phenomena. Not the case! I find it harmless and much of it pleasant, even superficially involving. It is just that I am not certain how to treat it as a designer without artistic license.
 
Schiit Audio Stay updated on Schiit Audio at their sponsor profile on Head-Fi.
 
https://www.facebook.com/Schiit/ http://www.schiit.com/
Aug 2, 2016 at 8:04 AM Post #894 of 14,074

KoshNaranek

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As I have reported elsewhere in this thread, I view my mission as a creator of audio equipment to be for the reproduction of music. I define reproduction as a recreation of events which have their genus directly creating acoustic energy. This is not only unplugged instruments and human voices, but, for example, Les Pauls or Telecasters played through Marshall stacks as well. (Among many other similar examples.)


 


Electronica, computer generated voices, etc. are generated synthetically by computers, and have no consistent acoustic definition. This leads to a dilemma - how does one objectively reproduce such artificial content.


 


It is not as simple that I don’t give a flying phuc about this latter category of artificially generated electronica (which for the most part I do not). It is just that I have no idea how to reproduce something not acoustically generated. Most customers of our products report their satisfaction with our gear for such content.  Perhaps this says that audio reproduction design goals are in order for artificial music.


 


Granted, I can understand that some of you may take from these comments that I am snobbish and condescending to such undefined acoustic phenomena. Not the case! I find it harmless and much of it pleasant, even superficially involving. It is just that I am not certain how to treat it as a designer without artistic license.


Interesting. I would have thought your reaction would have been more similar to mine. Which was open mouthed disbelief.

I was forced to come to grips with it, however, because my son wanted to go to the show.

I ended up escorting a bunch of teens to the show. I think I am getting to old for this sort of thing.
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 10:29 AM Post #895 of 14,074

ThePianoMan

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Hahaha, I've heard about those Hatsune Miku concerts. Interesting stuff...
I'm actually a fringe fan of some k-pop and J-pop, and I do love me some well done electronica (there's actually some very good stuff out there)
From a design prospective I think of electronic music in these terms: it's still just waveforms. Usually systems that are good at reproducing acoustic music, will do fine with (well produced) electronic music too. But I'm sure Mike already knows that. You're Multibit DACs are awesome by the way Mike! Some of the engineers I know have been asking me about Yggdrasils. Might be time to go check out the gearslutz boards?
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 12:31 PM Post #896 of 14,074

ScottFree

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Interesting. I would have thought your reaction would have been more similar to mine. Which was open mouthed disbelief.

I was forced to come to grips with it, however, because my son wanted to go to the show.

I ended up escorting a bunch of teens to the show. I think I am getting to old for this sort of thing.

 
 
Hahaha, I've heard about those Hatsune Miku concerts. Interesting stuff...
I'm actually a fringe fan of some k-pop and J-pop, and I do love me some well done electronica (there's actually some very good stuff out there)
From a design prospective I think of electronic music in these terms: it's still just waveforms. Usually systems that are good at reproducing acoustic music, will do fine with (well produced) electronic music too. But I'm sure Mike already knows that. You're Multibit DACs are awesome by the way Mike! Some of the engineers I know have been asking me about Yggdrasils. Might be time to go check out the gearslutz boards?

 
 
   
As I have reported elsewhere in this thread, I view my mission as a creator of audio equipment to be for the reproduction of music. I define reproduction as a recreation of events which have their genus directly creating acoustic energy. This is not only unplugged instruments and human voices, but, for example, Les Pauls or Telecasters played through Marshall stacks as well. (Among many other similar examples.)
 
Electronica, computer generated voices, etc. are generated synthetically by computers, and have no consistent acoustic definition. This leads to a dilemma - how does one objectively reproduce such artificial content.
 
It is not as simple that I don’t give a flying phuc about this latter category of artificially generated electronica (which for the most part I do not). It is just that I have no idea how to reproduce something not acoustically generated. Most customers of our products report their satisfaction with our gear for such content.  Perhaps this says that audio reproduction design goals are in order for artificial music.
 
Granted, I can understand that some of you may take from these comments that I am snobbish and condescending to such undefined acoustic phenomena. Not the case! I find it harmless and much of it pleasant, even superficially involving. It is just that I am not certain how to treat it as a designer without artistic license.

 
I've never really liked any kind of electronica myself. Occasionally I'll play an album but nothing really moves me much. One band that I do make exception for is a group called Juno Reactor. Discovered them when they teamed up with Don Davis for the Matrix sequels, which I have to confess,I did enjoy very much. In my mind the perfect blend of electronica, mixed with real instruments.
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 12:56 PM Post #897 of 14,074

madwolfa

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How about Vangelis or Jean Michel Jarre? Daft Punk, Kraftwerk, Aphex Twin. The Prodigy? Future Sound of London, Massive Attack? There is a lot of talent in electronic music. I couldn't care less about how exactly the sound waves are produced as long as I like what I hear...
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 1:11 PM Post #898 of 14,074

kstuart

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Mike -
 
The logical solution is to create and tweak the audio playback system so that it reproduces a wide variety of acoustic music as faithfully as possible, and then it should accurately reproduce electronic music as well.
 
Same logic as tuning a guitar to a tuning fork - even though you are not using the tuning fork in the concert.
 
For example, Bimby works really well for the music just mentioned by Madwolfa.
 
Aug 2, 2016 at 1:17 PM Post #899 of 14,074

madwolfa

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Aug 2, 2016 at 2:38 PM Post #900 of 14,074

ThePianoMan

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For those interested, the below links are a Radio 1 Ibiza concert of dance music/electronica played by a huge orchestra at Royal Albert Hall, and the new album by Dave Douglas, a fusion of jazz and electronic music inspired by books on cyber warfare. Both very different though quite cool (IMO) also pretty fabulous sound on the CD version of the Dave Douglas : )

Might also check out Hans Ek's dance music symphony or the Archandroid by Janelle Monae. Both have some interesting mixtures of electronic and orchestral music.

https://youtu.be/xs3BXVTF7mw

https://youtu.be/b0RE_XRm0lQ
 

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