Watches - another passion of ours, it seems...post your pics!
Jul 13, 2021 at 6:52 AM Post #13,411 of 13,457

chrisgtl

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IMG_20201110_185550_569.jpg
 
Jul 17, 2021 at 12:54 AM Post #13,413 of 13,457

Watagump

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Nothing new in the watch department, just some straps I have added. The first 3 on the left are OEM, even the one on the watch, the rest are aftermarket. I really prefer contrast stitching, so the 3rd from the left really doesn't get used. It is the one that came with the watch though.

20210716_215032.jpg
 
Jul 20, 2021 at 3:35 AM Post #13,415 of 13,457

monduvo

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Hi.


I found out about this thread recently, and thought I would share some of my thoughts and photos of watches I use in rotation.

My casual/all-rounder watch for on-the-go and outdoors is a Casio Mudmaster (GWG1000-1A3) with hook strap.
1_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_Front.jpg 2_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_Lume.jpg 3_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_LumeWithBackLighting.jpg


Another decent rounder watch I wear when hiking on long distance trails is a Casio Rangeman (GW9400-1B) with nylon strap, as I find its compass easier to use.
4_CasioRangemanGW9400-1B_Front.jpg 5_CasioRangemanGW9400-1B_Backlighting.jpg


For work, sometimes I wear a Casio F-91W with nylon strap, due to its thinner profile and light weight.
6_CasioF91-W_Front.jpg


On the weekends, for casual outings, my go-to watch is a Smiths PRS-29A (microbrand TimeFactors, 36mm, hand-winding) with a MN nylon strap.
7_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Front.jpg 8_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Lume.jpeg 9_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_CrownSide.jpg 10_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Back.jpg


-monduvo.
 
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Jul 21, 2021 at 6:27 PM Post #13,416 of 13,457

snapandslide

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Hi.


I found out about this thread recently, and thought I would share some of my thoughts and photos of watches I use in rotation.

My casual/all-rounder watch for on-the-go and outdoors is a Casio Mudmaster (GWG1000-1A3) with hook strap.
1_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_Front.jpg 2_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_Lume.jpg 3_CasioMudmasterGWG1000-1A3_LumeWithBackLighting.jpg


Another decent rounder watch I wear when hiking on long distance trails is a Casio Rangeman (GW9400-1B) with nylon strap, as I find its compass easier to use.
4_CasioRangemanGW9400-1B_Front.jpg 5_CasioRangemanGW9400-1B_Backlighting.jpg


For work, sometimes I wear a Casio F-91W with nylon strap, due to its thinner profile and light weight.
6_CasioF91-W_Front.jpg


On the weekends, for casual outings, my go-to watch is a Smiths PRS-29A (microbrand TimeFactors, 36mm, hand-winding) with a MN nylon strap.
7_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Front.jpg 8_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Lume.jpeg 9_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_CrownSide.jpg 10_TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_Back.jpg


-monduvo.

The Smiths is a very good watch, Eddie makes some great ones.....I have 2!!! I'm happy to see Eddie getting a lot of success, he deserves it. I'm also pretty active on his forum, tz-uk which can be rather ecclectic!
 
Jul 22, 2021 at 4:32 AM Post #13,417 of 13,457

monduvo

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The Smiths is a very good watch, Eddie makes some great ones.....I have 2!!! I'm happy to see Eddie getting a lot of success, he deserves it. I'm also pretty active on his forum, tz-uk which can be rather ecclectic!

Hi snapandslide,



Thanks for sharing this.

You are the first to mention Eddie of TimeFactors and “reissued” Smiths watches.

It seems to be a rarity to hear much about microbrand “reissued” military watches and vintage watches on threads and forums like this, yet watches in general have been my first loved hobby, and still is, before I knew anything about headphones, Walkmans, stereo speakers and hi-fi audio.


As for Eddie’s Smiths line-up, there are a few I like, but there is no other watch out there with an ETA 2801 hand-winding movement, low profile push-pull crown, antimagnetic steel cage, domed sapphire crystal and with a beautifully done timeless classic design in 36mm diameter and just over 10mm in case thickness at a similar price point and value like the PRS-29A. This watch is the one I reach for the most (purchased one within the first ten minutes of TimeFactors online store's opening from their website, on a Sunday morning in March 2020) and get the most wrist time (currently fitted with an Erika's Originals Marine Nationale inspired elastic black nylon strap with black DLC coated stainless steel buckle, as I find it to be the most comfortable) and enjoyment from, as it is as close as it can get to the original vintage Smiths timepiece, with Eddie’s own take on his reissued version while keeping true to its form, design and function as much as possible without upsetting its balance. When visually comparing the reissued TimeFactors Smiths PRS-29A to the original Smiths model (based on photos I have seen online), I do find the slightly thicker lug arms a touch wider than I would have liked, yet this is nitpicking at this point on aesthetics more than finding the right median in design and function for all-around versatility, durability and reliability.

Below is a photo of my PRS-29A with two straps I've used prior.
The strap at the very right is a Haveston Parade black nylon strap with brushed stainless steel hexagonal buckle and brushed stainless steel keepers.
Strap at the furthest right is a RAF inspired single-pass black leather strap with polished stainless steel buckle and leather keeper.
TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_withHavestonStrapAndSinglePassLeatherRAFStrap_07212021.jpeg



Also, another, and rather more highly anticipated, one of Eddie's "reissued" take on a military chronograph watch is a Smiths monopusher chronograph inspired by the LeMania monopusher chronograph (bi-compax) which was made for the British Royal Navy in the 1960s. I have been reading and following up on the revisions he's been making lately in the forum, and it seems like he is following his heart of artistry and more of his own personal take/approach on making some cosmetic changes in the hand, marker and dial to cater to a more wide audience of watch seekers and enthusiasts alike. Although I would have liked the monopusher chronograph dial, minute hand and hour marker to be more closely similar to the original with black hour numerals, black hour hand, black minute hand/marker indicators, black seconds hand, all beautifully contrasted by a clean white dial with no lume, it would be interesting to see what the final revision first sample/prototype would look like in the near coming months. We can only wait and see how this one will turn out.


I'd love to see other projects in the works that Eddie of TimeFactors has in store next. Maybe a modern take on a Universal Genève 1940s Tri-Compax chronograph with manual-winding column-wheel chronograph movement, plexiglass crystal, low profile crown and twin pushers, blued steel hands, telemeter scale, moonphase and calendar (display of month, date and day would be a plus)? That would be a dream.

Here is a screenshot taken of a photo of an original 1945 Universal Genève Tri-Compax chronograph watch (reference 22279, made sometime in mid-1940s / photo is originally from the Hodinkee website).
UniversalGeneveTri-CompaxChronograph_1945-Reference22279.jpg


And, speaking of the 1940s, I'll end my post for now with a YouTube video to a short segment of an all-time classic film 'A Song Is Born,' with long-remembered greats Danny Kaye, Benny Goodman, Louie Bellson, Louis Armstrong and many more.



-monduvo.
 
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Jul 22, 2021 at 5:32 AM Post #13,419 of 13,457

monduvo

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That PRS-29A is a really nice looking watch!

Hi Zojokkeli,


Thanks, it is indeed a beauty of simplicity and charm.

One of the first things I notice in the PRS29A is there is something alluring about the way the outer contoured shape of its lug arms and its delicate lines gracefully follow an effortless form.

It almost feels as if the lug arms' contoured lines gently flow and disappear into its own space while giving the illusion of continuity and transcendence into something much more.


-monduvo.
 
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Jul 22, 2021 at 5:54 AM Post #13,420 of 13,457

snapandslide

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Hi snapandslide,



Thanks for sharing this.

You are the first to mention Eddie of TimeFactors and “reissued” Smiths watches.

It seems to be a rarity to hear much about microbrand “reissued” military watches and vintage watches on threads and forums like this, yet watches in general have been my first loved hobby, and still is, before I knew anything about headphones, Walkmans, stereo speakers and hi-fi audio.


As for Eddie’s Smiths line-up, there are a few I like, but there is no other watch out there with an ETA 2801 hand-winding movement, low profile push-pull crown, antimagnetic steel cage, domed sapphire crystal and with a beautifully done timeless classic design in 36mm diameter and just over 10mm in case thickness at a similar price point and value like the PRS-29A. This watch is the one I reach for the most (purchased one within the first ten minutes of TimeFactors online store's opening from their website, on a Sunday morning in March 2020) and get the most wrist time (currently fitted with an Erika's Originals Marine Nationale inspired elastic black nylon strap with black DLC coated stainless steel buckle, as I find it to be the most comfortable) and enjoyment from, as it is as close as it can get to the original vintage Smiths timepiece, with Eddie’s own take on his reissued version while keeping true to its form, design and function as much as possible without upsetting its balance. When visually comparing the reissued TimeFactors Smiths PRS-29A to the original Smiths model (based on photos I have seen online), I do find the slightly thicker lug arms a touch wider than I would have liked, yet this is nitpicking at this point on aesthetics more than finding the right median in design and function for all-around versatility, durability and reliability.

Below is a photo of my PRS-29A with two straps I've used prior.
The strap at the very right is a Haveston Parade black nylon strap with brushed stainless steel hexagonal buckle and brushed stainless steel keepers.
Strap at the furthest right is a RAF inspired single-pass black leather strap with polished stainless steel buckle and leather keeper.
TimeFactorsSmithsPRS29-A_withHavestonStrapAndSinglePassLeatherRAFStrap_07212021.jpeg



Also, another, and rather more highly anticipated, one of Eddie's "reissued" take on a military chronograph watch is a Smiths monopusher chronograph inspired by the LeMania monopusher chronograph (bi-compax) which was made for the British Royal Navy in the 1960s. I have been reading and following up on the revisions he's been making lately in the forum, and it seems like he is following his heart of artistry and more of his own personal take/approach on making some cosmetic changes in the hand, marker and dial to cater to a more wide audience of watch seekers and enthusiasts alike. Although I would have liked the monopusher chronograph dial, minute hand and hour marker to be more closely similar to the original with black hour numerals, black hour hand, black minute hand/marker indicators, black seconds hand, all beautifully contrasted by a clean white dial with no lume, it would be interesting to see what the final revision first sample/prototype would look like in the near coming months. We can only wait and see how this one will turn out.


I'd love to see other projects in the works that Eddie of TimeFactors has in store next. Maybe a modern take on a Universal Genève 1940s Tri-Compax chronograph with manual-winding column-wheel chronograph movement, plexiglass crystal, low profile crown and twin pushers, blued steel hands, telemeter scale, moonphase and calendar (display of month, date and day would be a plus)? That would be a dream.

Here is a screenshot taken of a photo of an original 1945 Universal Genève Tri-Compax chronograph watch (reference 22279, made sometime in mid-1940s / photo is originally from the Hodinkee website).
UniversalGeneveTri-CompaxChronograph_1945-Reference22279.jpg


And, speaking of the 1940s, I'll end my post for now with a YouTube video to a short segment of an all-time classic film 'A Song Is Born,' with long-remembered greats Danny Kaye, Benny Goodman, Louie Bellson, Louis Armstrong and many more.



-monduvo.
Hey Monduvo - what a great post! Like you watches is my main passion - I've been in this hole of a hobby for a while now!

Eddie's got great skill in recreating and manufacturing watches - his work in the military side of things is top notch. But that also lends to my main criticism of Eddie - too much recreation and not enough new/innovative design. Which is a shame because his track record with watches like the Dreadnaught is superb. My other criticism (which others may find as a plus...) is I prefer 37-38mm as my smallest size, 36mm is just a tad too small for me unfortunately. Alas the market is loving that size and he's selling like hot cakes in that area so all power to him.

Agree on the monopusher - also something I've been following. His biggest challenge in projects going forward is getting the right movements - I'm pretty sure he stopped producing the Smiths with the 2801 because he just couldn't get any more movements. It's an issue across the industry for microbrands when you're so far down the pecking order. I hope he can continue sourcing Swiss movements as variations to simply just Miyota (nothing wrong mind you with them).

As to the future - as I say, non military would be great! I'm looking forward to the Caribbean, but I really have enough dive watches (my two Eddies are the DN Voyager and a PRS-3 blue LE). But I'm on a self imposed ban from watches this year (which has all gone into head-fi..........).
 
Jul 22, 2021 at 11:46 PM Post #13,421 of 13,457

monduvo

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Hey Monduvo - what a great post! Like you watches is my main passion - I've been in this hole of a hobby for a while now!

Eddie's got great skill in recreating and manufacturing watches - his work in the military side of things is top notch. But that also lends to my main criticism of Eddie - too much recreation and not enough new/innovative design. Which is a shame because his track record with watches like the Dreadnaught is superb. My other criticism (which others may find as a plus...) is I prefer 37-38mm as my smallest size, 36mm is just a tad too small for me unfortunately. Alas the market is loving that size and he's selling like hot cakes in that area so all power to him.

Agree on the monopusher - also something I've been following. His biggest challenge in projects going forward is getting the right movements - I'm pretty sure he stopped producing the Smiths with the 2801 because he just couldn't get any more movements. It's an issue across the industry for microbrands when you're so far down the pecking order. I hope he can continue sourcing Swiss movements as variations to simply just Miyota (nothing wrong mind you with them).

As to the future - as I say, non military would be great! I'm looking forward to the Caribbean, but I really have enough dive watches (my two Eddies are the DN Voyager and a PRS-3 blue LE). But I'm on a self imposed ban from watches this year (which has all gone into head-fi..........).

Hi snapandslide,


I agree and can relate to most of the things you mentioned about Eddie’s recreational take on the line-ups of watches he has put on TimeFactors.

I think most of the watches he has worked on and sells comes from his hobbyist approach in working with tried-and-true all-classic designs and movements.

Further, I can see that many of his watches from his timepiece line-ups seem to be overcrowded in a way with more similarities than what sets each model apart in terms of their intended use, functionality and qualities.

I think it would be resourceful for Eddie to keep the Precista, Smiths and Dreadnaught line-ups, and narrow down and refine the models that hold fair significance and value in watchmaking history and community with changes where needed, as I believe these three timepiece line-ups have enough qualities of their own to differentiate themselves apart and significantly more so from the rest of his other timepiece line-ups.

Also, for development in recent and upcoming watches that Eddie has worked on, I think it would be a more sustainable move for Eddie to deconstruct other tried-and-true hand-winding chronograph movements, rather than using the same common base movement (such as the ETA/Valjoux Caliber 7750), and make refinements in the right places where needed most with less bulk of material and parts and with redesigned in-house interconnecting parts for more efficiency in operation/functionality of its components and in the development/production process as a whole.

One other thing I would like to add is the lack of character in Eddie’s watches, as watches made at this level of pedigree should at least share some of the characteristics and intangible qualities (emotion) that were found in original issued military watches. Every part of the watch from operation in winding of the crown to pulling/pushing of the crown and to simply have it worn on the wrist should be an alluring experience that is special and unique to the watch by captivating the individual’s emotions and senses.

Maybe one day Eddie will find and bring something new to the table and see how things progress from there.


-monduvo.
 
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Jul 23, 2021 at 4:25 AM Post #13,422 of 13,457

snapandslide

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Hi snapandslide,


I agree and can relate to most of the things you mentioned about Eddie’s recreational take on the line-ups of watches he has put on TimeFactors.

I think most of the watches he has worked on and sells comes from his hobbyist approach in working with tried-and-true all-classic designs and movements.

Further, I can see that many of his watches from his timepiece line-ups seem to be overcrowded in a way with more similarities than what sets each model apart in terms of their intended use, functionality and qualities.

I think it would be resourceful for Eddie to keep the Precista, Smiths and Dreadnaught line-ups, and narrow down and refine the models that hold fair significance and value in watchmaking history and community with changes where needed, as I believe these three timepiece line-ups have enough qualities of their own to differentiate themselves apart and significantly more so from the rest of his other timepiece line-ups.

Also, for development in recent and upcoming watches that Eddie has worked on, I think it would be a more sustainable move for Eddie to deconstruct other tried-and-true hand-winding chronograph movements, rather than using the same common base movement (such as the ETA/Valjoux Caliber 7750), and make refinements in the right places where needed most with less bulk of material and parts and with redesigned in-house interconnecting parts for more efficiency in operation/functionality of its components and in the development/production process as a whole.

One other thing I would like to add is the lack of character in Eddie’s watches, as watches made at this level of pedigree should at least share some of the characteristics and intangible qualities (emotion) that were found in original issued military watches. Every part of the watch from operation in winding of the crown to pulling/pushing of the crown and to simply have it worn on the wrist should be an alluring experience that is special and unique to the watch by captivating the individual’s emotions and senses.

Maybe one day Eddie will find and bring something new to the table and see how things progress from there.


-monduvo.

Very well said - I've mentioned to Eddie a few times about 'stepping up' and going into another price range. But he's found that hard - the few times he's made watches at the £1k level, they've taken quite some time to sell out. He may have stuck himself with the level of creations he's currently at. We forget the Dreadnaught essentially kicked off the whole micro-brand segment 20 odd years ago - what a watch that was. So he can create that character, but alas we've not seen it enough. Wearing my PRS-3 today, which funnily is one of the watches people comment on a lot!
 

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Jul 23, 2021 at 5:52 PM Post #13,423 of 13,457

monduvo

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Very well said - I've mentioned to Eddie a few times about 'stepping up' and going into another price range. But he's found that hard - the few times he's made watches at the £1k level, they've taken quite some time to sell out. He may have stuck himself with the level of creations he's currently at. We forget the Dreadnaught essentially kicked off the whole micro-brand segment 20 odd years ago - what a watch that was. So he can create that character, but alas we've not seen it enough. Wearing my PRS-3 today, which funnily is one of the watches people comment on a lot!

Hi snapandslide,


These are all excellent points and are well received. I love the unique styling of your diver watch, which is somewhat reminiscent of Omega Seamaster Diver and Omega Planet Ocean in its hour markers and its 3 o’clock & 9 o’clock hour numerals on the dial, with a bit of Doxa Sub 300T in the orange outlined minute hand and slightly in the taper shaped ends of the case.

As for Eddie’s current line-up of his staple timepieces, starting with the Dreadnought, I feel the redesign of its case and exterior, while still an important part of the process to improve durability and longevity in build quality and use, appears more retro-dated and not as visually/emotionally engaging when it was first released in its design and form, as watches in this class (military diver type with bold/forward styling) need more than just internal changes in material and construction and minor revisions to stay relevant and to sustain longevity in its brand/image.

I believe Eddie would have to deconstruct, examine and redesign and reconstruct the Dreadnought in reviving its design in a more appealing way while preserving its bold character and visuals to rekindle the same kind of feeling and spirit of excitement and mystique which were once key to the Dreadnought’s initial success. Hopefully, these redesign cues and redevelopment process will help inspire Eddie to go out of his comfort zone and come up with another memorably unique timepiece creation of his own.

Lastly, as we live with change in times, I think people in general have a progressive-forward view in evolutionary growth of design and style of a product from its starting point. And, as the right median of changes are being made in design and components, without reaching their extremes, I believe these changes keep a balance in continued interest of people, fostered growth of love and passion of this hobby and the significance of the watch/timepiece brand’s identity for many years to come.


-monduvo.
 
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Jul 24, 2021 at 9:56 AM Post #13,424 of 13,457

monduvo

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Hi everyone.


It’s been four months since I first got these, and I still like this pairing, as I feel they complement each other well.

Casio Mudmaster (GWG1000-1A3) and EE LX.

1205319F-EFEE-4BB6-B39F-70108670AD60.jpeg

CFCD8DE0-6D50-4A8D-8292-61A24E47C745.jpeg


-monduvo.
 
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Jul 31, 2021 at 4:16 AM Post #13,425 of 13,457

monduvo

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Hello everyone.



It has been a while since I've posted here.

From the past few weeks of my continued search in finding an all-rounder dive watch that would suit most of my preferences and use, I have come back to a watch brand that initially did not work with most of my preferences and uses, in terms of all-around practicality and ergonomics, in January 2021. Prior to finding out about this watch brand, there was a particular diver watch from another watch brand that I read about and purchased years before.

Ever since I had an Invicta 9937 as my first diver watch (with an ETA 2824 25 jewels automatic movement) in 2006, and later ended up with a loose seconds hand from its dial after about two years of wearing and using it almost daily on-the-go, I looked into more entry level priced watches and ended up wearing Casio G-Shock watches for a long while.

Fast forward to December 2020, I came across some military grade diver watches from Marathon Watch Company, and I ended up going for the Marathon GSAR (Government Search and Rescue) USMC (United States Marine Corps) diver watch (with an ETA 2824 25 jewels automatic movement), as I felt that its price point for what I was getting seemed to be more than reasonable.

Sometime in January 2021, the Marathon GSAR diver watch arrived, and after wearing and using it for few outings and grocery/cafe trips, I noticed there was more heft in feel of the weight and slight bulk shape and form of the watch. Another thing I noticed was its protruded crown which frequently got in direct contact with the bottommost part of my hand even with just a slight lift of my left hand to wrist, and made it uncomfortable to use and wear for more than several hours at a time. Lastly, the size and position of its hour numerals and markers made it somewhat difficult and inconvenient to see the time at a glance, as the crystal appeared to make the inner metal ring of the dial to occupy more space, which gave the optical effect of its hour numerals and hour and minute hands and markers of the dial to be pushed more inward with less space in between its markers and hands. As a result, this made legibility of the time fairly difficult from a quick/brief glance on-the-go.

MarathonGSARUSMCDiveWatch_FrontView_01112021.JPEG

MarathonGSARUSMCDiveWatch_BottomSideView_01112021.jpg

MarathonGSARUSMCDiveWatch_TritiumMarkersInDark_01112021.JPEG

In a little less than a month, I ended up selling the Marathon GSAR USMC diver watch on eBay, and I went back to wearing my Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1 mostly for work use.


After months of acquiring more interest in searching, reading and learning more about in-ear monitors than watches from February up until June of 2021, sometime in July 2021, I continued my search for a diver watch that would meet most of my preferences and uses for on-the-go and also for work. From the last week of July 2021, after having recently purchased a wall digital clock from Marathon Watch Company, I revisited line-ups of their watches, and after having gathered enough information from threads and reviews about the watch I had in mind, I went for a Marathon Jumbo Day Date diver watch (46mm in diameter, with Tritium gas tube markers, and an ETA 2836 25 jewels automatic movement with day and date complication).

As of July 30, 2021, the Marathon JDD arrived late Friday morning, and after wearing this watch on a quick drive after work to get some grocery at the market and back, the raised metal caseback makes a noticeable difference in evenly distributing the weight and feeling of heft, and more importantly providing enough space with just the right amount of distance in its position for more free range movement of my left hand to wrist without feeling any interference nor irritation from contact with its crown. Also, I found its hour numerals, hour and minute markers and hands to have the right amount of space in between with more balance in their subtly pronounced visual presence and legible appearance.

Here are some photos of the Marathon Jumbo Day Date diver watch (46mm in diameter, with Tritium gas tube markers, ETA 2836 25 jewels automatic, and fitted with a Marathon single-pass black ballistic nylon strap in 22mm width), and also of its comparison in size with the Casio Mudmaster GWG1000-1A3.

1_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_FrontView_07302021.JPEG

2_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_Caseback_07302021.JPEG

3_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_CloseupOfDial_07302021.JPEG

4_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_TritiumMarkers_07302021.JPEG

5_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_SizeComparisonWithCasioGWG1000-1A3_07302021.JPEG

6_MarathonJDDDIveWatch_ThicknessComparisonWithCasioGWG1000-1A3_07302021.JPEG

MarathonJDDandSonyIER-Z1R_07302021.jpeg



-monduvo.
 
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