Unique Melody 3D Terminator 3DT Announcement Thread
Jan 27, 2021 at 6:39 PM Post #316 of 1,402

Xinlisupreme

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Jan 27, 2021 at 6:40 PM Post #317 of 1,402

szore

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Jan 27, 2021 at 6:48 PM Post #318 of 1,402

Xinlisupreme

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I didn’t notice any issues with new fw
 
Jan 27, 2021 at 6:49 PM Post #319 of 1,402

Xinlisupreme

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Guys 3dt but Zen also calls me and I didn’t receive IT07 😅🙈
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 12:38 AM Post #321 of 1,402

Cheaplad

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Throw various cables at the 3DT (and using N3Pro) and I really like the pairing with SXC-8 (8-wire silver-plated copper) most.

Yes, the PW Audio No. 5 (4-wire Copper Litz) does provide more impact at the low but the presentation has been less detailed than SXC-8 and roll-off in the high.

R'Studio's Adamas (EDIT a 2-wire **silver-plated copper cable) is quite similar to SXC-8 in terms of soundstage, and presentation of mid and high, but has less detail in the low and mid as SXC-8.

The pairing with Toxic' SW22 Mk2 (silver with 1% gold) is my least favourite being too...... sterile and boring, especially in the low. The soundstage is wide though.
 
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Jan 28, 2021 at 1:11 AM Post #322 of 1,402

slex

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D75352EA-9CD3-4919-9D57-3ECAAE9B2645.jpeg

Throw various cables at the 3DT (and using N3Pro) and I really like the pairing with SXC-8 (8-wire silver-plated copper) most.

Yes, the PW Audio No. 5 (4-wire Copper Litz) does provide more impact at the low but the presentation has been less detailed than SXC-8 and roll-off in the high.

R'Studio's Adamas (a 2-wire copper-plated silver cable) is quite similar to SXC-8 in terms of soundstage, and presentation of mid and high, but has less detail in the low and mid as SXC-8.

The pairing with Toxic' SW22 Mk2 (silver with 1% gold) is my least favourite being too...... sterile and boring, especially in the low. The soundstage is wide though.
Nice! May I know what tips are those on your 3DT? I should have my 3DT tonite😊
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 2:09 AM Post #323 of 1,402

tgx78

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3DT vs ZEN

I need to start this comparison with a disclaimer, I listen to all types of music, but mostly I've been into classical music genre for last 30 years. My main goal is in achieving a wide sound-stage with pinpoint imaging and excellent detail. If that can be done with musical tonality then it would be most ideal. My current reference sets are the Penon Volt (+ slight EQ) and the IEM-Z1R.

Starting with the 3DT, there is no denying, its focus is square on detail retrieval via treble extension, the UM's triple DD unit is an decisively high-resolution IEM. The sound-stage it produces is not forward but it is very vivid. Perhaps this came through most clearly on the CD(rip) The World According to Andy Bey [High Note]. On the cut “Never Entered My Mind,” for instance, Bey’s grandiose voice and rich piano chords permeate the listening space, with his ample use of the pedal patently audible. The same attention to detail was apparent on a performance of Elgar’s cello concerto by Jacqueline du Pre on the Warner Classic label. Once again, the superb transient and timbral fidelity of the 3DT was apparent. The 3DT was able to evoke not simply the bowing of the cello but its resonating cavity. The emotional plangency of the introduction, as the cello and orchestra surge, came through with real verisimilitude. At such times, it’s hard to believe that an IEM can produce such an ocean of sound to smoothly sweep you away.

Once again, I don’t mean to imply that the 3DT can best much bigger and more elaborate IEMs like the Z1R or the MEST. The real point is somewhat different. It’s that the 3DT delivers a remarkable quotient of reference-level of sound for its price. This IEM is hardly a budget item, but, at the same time, it’s nowhere near the Rockefeller-like planet a goodly slice of equipment occupies. So on the overall price-versus-value spectrum, the 3DT deserves to be singled out as a true contender, a revealing and refined IEM that, coupled with excellent source and cable, can deliver breathtaking sound.

Moving onto the ZEN which is masterfully engineered and tuned by DUNU:
I quickly noticed that the Zen's treble is spot on, offering tremendous energy dispersion with no trace of fatigue, even after very long listening sessions.
The ZEN has incredibly natural and a planar like fluidity and flowing mid-range. The Zen also have excellent image, dynamic, transparency, and a slightly forgiving sound compared to the 3DT.
In listening to the Zen, it only seemed fitting to begin with Mozart. Some of my favorite new CDs are appearing on Harmonia Mundi with the Dutch fortepiano-playing phenom Kristian Bezuidenhout, who steadily records Mozart’s keyboard music for the label. The detail he extract out of the sonatas makes his recordings something of a revelation. It was quite an absorbing experience to listen to the Zen capture the nuances of his playing. The sense of black space and decay endowed the music with a great sense of realism. It almost seemed as though you could see the forte-piano’s hammer striking the string and the felt damper stopping the string from vibrating. When an IEM reaches this level of fidelity it feels as though you can sense the movements of Bezuidenhout himself.
For all its control and grip, then, the Zen does not suffocate music, as some IEMs do. Rather, it is quite special for what it does not do, which is to say that the lack of bass overboost and overhang is a very discernible feature.

I would have to say emphatically that while the 3DT is a very fine IEM, the Zen (for my listening purposes) had a small advantage since the mid-range is where I live on the audio spectrum and Zen brought about Mids more convincingly and its liquid tonality was more versatile for many different genres of music.
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 3:03 AM Post #326 of 1,402

slex

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3DT vs ZEN

I need to start this comparison with a disclaimer, I listen to all types of music, but mostly I've been into classical music genre for last 30 years. My main goal is in achieving a wide sound-stage with pinpoint imaging and excellent detail. If that can be done with musical tonality then it would be most ideal. My current reference sets are the Penon Volt (+ slight EQ) and the IEM-Z1R.

Starting with the 3DT, there is no denying, its focus is square on detail retrieval via treble extension, the UM's triple DD unit is an decisively high-resolution IEM. The sound-stage it produces is not forward but it is very vivid. Perhaps this came through most clearly on the CD(rip) The World According to Andy Bey [High Note]. On the cut “Never Entered My Mind,” for instance, Bey’s grandiose voice and rich piano chords permeate the listening space, with his ample use of the pedal patently audible. The same attention to detail was apparent on a performance of Elgar’s cello concerto by Jacqueline du Pre on the Warner Classic label. Once again, the superb transient and timbral fidelity of the 3DT was apparent. The 3DT was able to evoke not simply the bowing of the cello but its resonating cavity. The emotional plangency of the introduction, as the cello and orchestra surge, came through with real verisimilitude. At such times, it’s hard to believe that an IEM can produce such an ocean of sound to smoothly sweep you away.

Once again, I don’t mean to imply that the 3DT can best much bigger and more elaborate IEMs like the Z1R or the MEST. The real point is somewhat different. It’s that the 3DT delivers a remarkable quotient of reference-level of sound for its price. This IEM is hardly a budget item, but, at the same time, it’s nowhere near the Rockefeller-like planet a goodly slice of equipment occupies. So on the overall price-versus-value spectrum, the 3DT deserves to be singled out as a true contender, a revealing and refined IEM that, coupled with excellent source and cable, can deliver breathtaking sound.

Moving onto the ZEN which is masterfully engineered and tuned by DUNU:
I quickly noticed that the Zen's treble is spot on, offering tremendous energy dispersion with no trace of fatigue, even after very long listening sessions.
The ZEN has incredibly natural and a planar like fluidity and flowing mid-range. The Zen also have excellent image, dynamic, transparency, and a slightly forgiving sound compared to the 3DT.
In listening to the Zen, it only seemed fitting to begin with Mozart. Some of my favorite new CDs are appearing on Harmonia Mundi with the Dutch fortepiano-playing phenom Kristian Bezuidenhout, who steadily records Mozart’s keyboard music for the label. The detail he extract out of the sonatas makes his recordings something of a revelation. It was quite an absorbing experience to listen to the Zen capture the nuances of his playing. The sense of black space and decay endowed the music with a great sense of realism. It almost seemed as though you could see the forte-piano’s hammer striking the string and the felt damper stopping the string from vibrating. When an IEM reaches this level of fidelity it feels as though you can sense the movements of Bezuidenhout himself.
For all its control and grip, then, the Zen does not suffocate music, as some IEMs do. Rather, it is quite special for what it does not do, which is to say that the lack of bass overboost and overhang is a very discernible feature.

I would have to say emphatically that while the 3DT is a very fine IEM, the Zen (for my listening purposes) had a small advantage since the mid-range is where I live on the audio spectrum and Zen brought about Mids more convincingly and its liquid tonality was more versatile for many different genres of music.
@tgx78 Does your penon VOLT's EST have an edge over ZEN in the high regions of frequency?
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 4:37 AM Post #327 of 1,402

Ace Bee

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3DT vs ZEN

I need to start this comparison with a disclaimer, I listen to all types of music, but mostly I've been into classical music genre for last 30 years. My main goal is in achieving a wide sound-stage with pinpoint imaging and excellent detail. If that can be done with musical tonality then it would be most ideal. My current reference sets are the Penon Volt (+ slight EQ) and the IEM-Z1R.

Starting with the 3DT, there is no denying, its focus is square on detail retrieval via treble extension, the UM's triple DD unit is an decisively high-resolution IEM. The sound-stage it produces is not forward but it is very vivid. Perhaps this came through most clearly on the CD(rip) The World According to Andy Bey [High Note]. On the cut “Never Entered My Mind,” for instance, Bey’s grandiose voice and rich piano chords permeate the listening space, with his ample use of the pedal patently audible. The same attention to detail was apparent on a performance of Elgar’s cello concerto by Jacqueline du Pre on the Warner Classic label. Once again, the superb transient and timbral fidelity of the 3DT was apparent. The 3DT was able to evoke not simply the bowing of the cello but its resonating cavity. The emotional plangency of the introduction, as the cello and orchestra surge, came through with real verisimilitude. At such times, it’s hard to believe that an IEM can produce such an ocean of sound to smoothly sweep you away.

Once again, I don’t mean to imply that the 3DT can best much bigger and more elaborate IEMs like the Z1R or the MEST. The real point is somewhat different. It’s that the 3DT delivers a remarkable quotient of reference-level of sound for its price. This IEM is hardly a budget item, but, at the same time, it’s nowhere near the Rockefeller-like planet a goodly slice of equipment occupies. So on the overall price-versus-value spectrum, the 3DT deserves to be singled out as a true contender, a revealing and refined IEM that, coupled with excellent source and cable, can deliver breathtaking sound.

Moving onto the ZEN which is masterfully engineered and tuned by DUNU:
I quickly noticed that the Zen's treble is spot on, offering tremendous energy dispersion with no trace of fatigue, even after very long listening sessions.
The ZEN has incredibly natural and a planar like fluidity and flowing mid-range. The Zen also have excellent image, dynamic, transparency, and a slightly forgiving sound compared to the 3DT.
In listening to the Zen, it only seemed fitting to begin with Mozart. Some of my favorite new CDs are appearing on Harmonia Mundi with the Dutch fortepiano-playing phenom Kristian Bezuidenhout, who steadily records Mozart’s keyboard music for the label. The detail he extract out of the sonatas makes his recordings something of a revelation. It was quite an absorbing experience to listen to the Zen capture the nuances of his playing. The sense of black space and decay endowed the music with a great sense of realism. It almost seemed as though you could see the forte-piano’s hammer striking the string and the felt damper stopping the string from vibrating. When an IEM reaches this level of fidelity it feels as though you can sense the movements of Bezuidenhout himself.
For all its control and grip, then, the Zen does not suffocate music, as some IEMs do. Rather, it is quite special for what it does not do, which is to say that the lack of bass overboost and overhang is a very discernible feature.

I would have to say emphatically that while the 3DT is a very fine IEM, the Zen (for my listening purposes) had a small advantage since the mid-range is where I live on the audio spectrum and Zen brought about Mids more convincingly and its liquid tonality was more versatile for many different genres of music.
Regarding notes, which one has sharper notes? Zen or 3DT?
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 6:48 AM Post #328 of 1,402

szore

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3DT vs ZEN

I need to start this comparison with a disclaimer, I listen to all types of music, but mostly I've been into classical music genre for last 30 years. My main goal is in achieving a wide sound-stage with pinpoint imaging and excellent detail. If that can be done with musical tonality then it would be most ideal. My current reference sets are the Penon Volt (+ slight EQ) and the IEM-Z1R.

Starting with the 3DT, there is no denying, its focus is square on detail retrieval via treble extension, the UM's triple DD unit is an decisively high-resolution IEM. The sound-stage it produces is not forward but it is very vivid. Perhaps this came through most clearly on the CD(rip) The World According to Andy Bey [High Note]. On the cut “Never Entered My Mind,” for instance, Bey’s grandiose voice and rich piano chords permeate the listening space, with his ample use of the pedal patently audible. The same attention to detail was apparent on a performance of Elgar’s cello concerto by Jacqueline du Pre on the Warner Classic label. Once again, the superb transient and timbral fidelity of the 3DT was apparent. The 3DT was able to evoke not simply the bowing of the cello but its resonating cavity. The emotional plangency of the introduction, as the cello and orchestra surge, came through with real verisimilitude. At such times, it’s hard to believe that an IEM can produce such an ocean of sound to smoothly sweep you away.

Once again, I don’t mean to imply that the 3DT can best much bigger and more elaborate IEMs like the Z1R or the MEST. The real point is somewhat different. It’s that the 3DT delivers a remarkable quotient of reference-level of sound for its price. This IEM is hardly a budget item, but, at the same time, it’s nowhere near the Rockefeller-like planet a goodly slice of equipment occupies. So on the overall price-versus-value spectrum, the 3DT deserves to be singled out as a true contender, a revealing and refined IEM that, coupled with excellent source and cable, can deliver breathtaking sound.

Moving onto the ZEN which is masterfully engineered and tuned by DUNU:
I quickly noticed that the Zen's treble is spot on, offering tremendous energy dispersion with no trace of fatigue, even after very long listening sessions.
The ZEN has incredibly natural and a planar like fluidity and flowing mid-range. The Zen also have excellent image, dynamic, transparency, and a slightly forgiving sound compared to the 3DT.
In listening to the Zen, it only seemed fitting to begin with Mozart. Some of my favorite new CDs are appearing on Harmonia Mundi with the Dutch fortepiano-playing phenom Kristian Bezuidenhout, who steadily records Mozart’s keyboard music for the label. The detail he extract out of the sonatas makes his recordings something of a revelation. It was quite an absorbing experience to listen to the Zen capture the nuances of his playing. The sense of black space and decay endowed the music with a great sense of realism. It almost seemed as though you could see the forte-piano’s hammer striking the string and the felt damper stopping the string from vibrating. When an IEM reaches this level of fidelity it feels as though you can sense the movements of Bezuidenhout himself.
For all its control and grip, then, the Zen does not suffocate music, as some IEMs do. Rather, it is quite special for what it does not do, which is to say that the lack of bass overboost and overhang is a very discernible feature.

I would have to say emphatically that while the 3DT is a very fine IEM, the Zen (for my listening purposes) had a small advantage since the mid-range is where I live on the audio spectrum and Zen brought about Mids more convincingly and its liquid tonality was more versatile for many different genres of music.
That was really nice, I shared that with a few people....
 
Jan 28, 2021 at 9:36 AM Post #330 of 1,402

Rockwell75

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