Toothpaste!
Mar 23, 2005 at 7:27 PM Post #16 of 46

jpr703

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I use toothpaste to clean up my scuba masks. Most have silicone skirts around the lenses and something during the manufacturing process gets some of this silicone on the lenses and makes them look foggy. Every time I get I new mask I spend a little time rubbing toothpaste over the lenses to remove the muck. You gotta exercise some caution though, there are some toothpastes out there that can be a little too abrasive.
 
Mar 23, 2005 at 9:27 PM Post #17 of 46

dallasstar

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I've known about this trick for a long time, but the only time I ever needed to use it, I kinda overdid it, and
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.
 
Mar 23, 2005 at 10:43 PM Post #18 of 46

UserNotFound

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pne
If you're a mountain biker, a dab of toothpaste on your brakes gives a lot more stopping power.


If you REALLY are a mountain biker, you should have disc brakes. They stop you full force no matter how wet or muddy or icey they get. Much more reliable that rim brakes. I found myself in half the races not being able to stop well the last 4 or 5 miles of my races, so i bought discs. What a difference!!
 
Mar 24, 2005 at 4:30 AM Post #19 of 46

Titanium Lizzard

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Cyclone
Toothpaste is composed of tiny rocks crushed into a powder and mixed into the paset making toothpaste...good god i know what rock it is too, but im drawing a blank. anyways, the paste helps smooth out any scratches and gouges by smoothing/sanding over any of the distortions created by the scratches. CD doctor does the same thing but uses a spinning wheel and makes your CD look like absolout shi t, and yet it works. funny how the answer to a scratched disk is even more scratches?
600smile.gif


Edit: the rock composition is mostly powdered limestone and sometimes a bit of sandstone.



Basically, you can use any white toothpaste to do the job. This will also repair glass(good news for my monitor).
 
Mar 24, 2005 at 5:58 AM Post #20 of 46

Cyclone

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Titanium Lizzard
Basically, you can use any white toothpaste to do the job. This will also repair glass(good news for my monitor).


rapair glass?... how? is toothpaste the new duct tape or something?

But ya, any major brand name or white toothpaste will do the trick, and technically its actually not sandstone but rather calcium carbonate...which is limestone. but people dont want to know that they brush their teeth with rocks.
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Mar 24, 2005 at 2:44 PM Post #21 of 46

jerb

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Cyclone
Toothpaste is composed of tiny rocks crushed into a powder and mixed into the paset making toothpaste...good god i know what rock it is too, but im drawing a blank. anyways, the paste helps smooth out any scratches and gouges by smoothing/sanding over any of the distortions created by the scratches. CD doctor does the same thing but uses a spinning wheel and makes your CD look like absolout shi t, and yet it works. funny how the answer to a scratched disk is even more scratches?
600smile.gif


Edit: the rock composition is mostly powdered limestone and sometimes a bit of sandstone.



i think their diatoms it has something to do with alge

*EDIT sorry i dint see that others had posted the awnser already
rolleyes.gif


Quote:

rapair glass?... how? is toothpaste the new duct tape or something?


tooth paste is an abrasive substance (thats why it cleans your teeth) so if you apply it to something like glass or plastic (such as a cd) and rub it you are actualy sanding down the plastic (wich makes the surrounding area equal with the scratches)
 
Mar 24, 2005 at 2:52 PM Post #22 of 46

kin0kin

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i used 2000grit sand paper, wet sanded all the freakingly scratched cds. for extra deep scratches, dry sanding that particualr part will do. after wet sanding it, i used a cd scratch-fix compound (d-skratch2) to remove the cloudy, fine scratches. end result was...99.9-100% quality rip
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the same method can be used to fix any acrylic and of the same material. I've also written a guide on this method in anotehr forum....somehow ive got a pm from somebody telling me that his cd didnt work after doing this....probably applied too much pressure while sanding....works very well and i've sanded about 30+ cds already
biggrin.gif
 
Mar 24, 2005 at 8:50 PM Post #23 of 46

Titanium Lizzard

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Cyclone
rapair glass?... how? is toothpaste the new duct tape or something?

But ya, any major brand name or white toothpaste will do the trick, and technically its actually not sandstone but rather calcium carbonate...which is limestone. but people dont want to know that they brush their teeth with rocks.
smily_headphones1.gif



Nothing will EVER replace duct tape. I beleive this actually works by filling in the cracks. No, you can't glue glass back together with it, only scratches.

PS:
"If you can't Duck it, screw it!"
 
Mar 25, 2005 at 3:56 PM Post #24 of 46

sclemmons

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I have scratched a few CD's before and take them to a store locally that resells video games. They have a polishing machine that will refurbish CD's to "like new" condition for a couple of bucks.

Thanks for the toothpaste tip. I have also tried Mapleshade Micro-smooth, but it is too subtle and too slow. I have had better luck with the store.
 
Apr 2, 2005 at 1:22 PM Post #25 of 46

Blue Meanie

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Quote:

Originally Posted by comabereni
Some use toothpaste to shape and polish amber, so this makes sense. Would take a bit of effort. I have a benchtop grinder and am planning on mounting two buffing wheels--one with diamond paste (or maybe toothpaste now that you've reminded me
smily_headphones1.gif
) so I can bring a few dozen dead Playstation, Dreamcast and music CDs back to life. I'd hate to do all that work by hand, but this is good to know.

-coma



A benchtop grinder to buff the scratches out of cds? I hope you have a very light touch. At the speed a grinder runs at, I would think you'd raise the temperature of the cd to the point of melting in a heartbeat. Of course, I could be wrong, as I have no idea of the melting point of polycarbonate.
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Please let us know if this works, as it would save me a lot of time!

I've got cds from 1985 that still look as new as the day they were made. 95% of my 600+ cds look that way. The other 5% may have a minor scratch or 2, but I've never damaged a cd bad enough to get it to even skip, much less being rendered unplayable. My 15 year old son is constantly bringing cds and playstation and xbox games to me crying about how they won't play properly, and I get stuck polishing them for him. If people took a little more pride in ownership, resulting in better care of their crap, most of these problems wouldn't occur in the first place. Maybe it's because I'm an old school fart of 46 that I take care of my stuff. Can't seem to teach my 15 year old a damn thing though. Maybe when he gets older and has to spend his own money buying things, he'll get a clue. But I'm not counting on it.

Yeah, I'm finally done ranting...
Sorry.
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Jeff
 
Apr 2, 2005 at 1:51 PM Post #26 of 46

pank2002

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Brasso will have the same effect on scratched CD's
 
Apr 2, 2005 at 2:03 PM Post #27 of 46

Blue Meanie

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pank2002
Basso will have the same effect on scratched CD's


Would that be similar to Brasso?

Jeff
 
Apr 2, 2005 at 2:05 PM Post #28 of 46

breez

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Note: Track Quality in EAC means just how many re-reads were needed to get a perfect rip.
 
Apr 3, 2005 at 3:00 AM Post #29 of 46

EdipisReks

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i might try this. all i have right now is weirdo vanilla mint crest that feels really gritty, so i might wait until i get to the store to buy some regular white toothpaste. i have a few cd's that were lent out and scratched to hell, and a bunch that came out of their cases during a move and got scratched up in the box i had placed them in
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