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Toothpaste!

Discussion in 'Computer Audio' started by viator122, Mar 23, 2005.
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  1. viator122
    I got a copy of Live Alive by Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble for free from a coworker. This disc was released in 1986 and by the looks of this thing, it could be a first pressing. The disc was all scratched up, but iTunes ripped it without complaint.

    When I went to listen today on my iPod through my e2cs I kept hearing little pops and clicks that were supremely annoying. Anyway, I took the disc out again today and tried to rip with EAC, but the track progress was moving in 0.1% increments for a total estimated time of 24 hours and it was giving me read and sync errors. So I said screw it and headed off to the bathroom with an old tshirt. I dropped a nice healthy bead of Aquafresh toothpaste on the disc and rubbed in circles for a while. Then I added some water to the tshirt and rubbed some more. Finally I put a lot of water on the shirt and wiped the toothpaste off. Then I repeated the whole process and stuck the disc back in my DVD-RW drive. EAC ripped about half the tracks at 100%, and the rest mostly at 99.8% or 99.9%. Two tracks ripped at 99.5% and 99.6%.

    So if you've got a disc that was alive to remember the rise and fall of parachute pants and looks like Joan Rivers' face, it might be worthwhile to give it a quick polish with some toothpaste.

    BTW, is 99.5% quality an acceptable level?
     
  2. gshan Contributor
    Well, I use toothpaste to shine up coins and silver, but this is good too.

    cd restoration liquid vs. spinning grinder vs. toothpaste

    someone needs to match these 3 with some scratched cds
     
  3. bLue_oNioN
    Wow, that is quite incredible and funny at the same time! I wonder why it works?
     
  4. pne
    ingenuis! I've tried using silver polish but it is slightly too rough/coarse. Toothpaste ought to do the trick!

    bLue_oNioN, it works because toothpaste is actually a paste of very fine grains mixed with other stuff. It polishes your teeth lightly each time you brush, which is how the plaque/tartar gets scrubbed off. Toothpaste has many uses. If you're a mountain biker, a dab of toothpaste on your brakes gives a lot more stopping power.
     
  5. Cyclone
    Toothpaste is composed of tiny rocks crushed into a powder and mixed into the paset making toothpaste...good god i know what rock it is too, but im drawing a blank. anyways, the paste helps smooth out any scratches and gouges by smoothing/sanding over any of the distortions created by the scratches. CD doctor does the same thing but uses a spinning wheel and makes your CD look like absolout shi t, and yet it works. funny how the answer to a scratched disk is even more scratches? [​IMG]

    Edit: the rock composition is mostly powdered limestone and sometimes a bit of sandstone.
     
  6. Bill Ward
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cyclone
    Toothpaste is composed of tiny rocks crushed into a powder and mixed into the paset making toothpaste...good god i know what rock it is too, but im drawing a blank. anyways, the paste helps smooth out any scratches and gouges by smoothing/sanding over any of the distortions created by the scratches. CD doctor does the same thing but uses a spinning wheel and makes your CD look like absolout shi t, and yet it works. funny how the answer to a scratched disk is even more scratches? [​IMG]



    diatomaceous earth

    BW
     
  7. Edwood
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bill Ward
    diatomaceous earth

    BW




    Great for killing ground bugs too.

    -Ed
     
  8. viator122
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Cyclone
    CD doctor does the same thing but uses a spinning wheel and makes your CD look like absolout shi t, and yet it works. funny how the answer to a scratched disk is even more scratches? [​IMG]



    Yeah well this CD sure isn't winning any beauty pageants either.

    I forgot to mention, the second time I polished the disc I used straight strokes from the center to the edge of the disc, like they always tell you to.
     
  9. comabereni Contributor
    Some use toothpaste to shape and polish amber, so this makes sense. Would take a bit of effort. I have a benchtop grinder and am planning on mounting two buffing wheels--one with diamond paste (or maybe toothpaste now that you've reminded me [​IMG]) so I can bring a few dozen dead Playstation, Dreamcast and music CDs back to life. I'd hate to do all that work by hand, but this is good to know.

    -coma
     
  10. viator122
    Just keep in mind that my experience with the toothpaste method is limited to one CD, so you might want to test your process on a less valued CD first.
     
  11. gsferrari Contributor
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pne
    f you're a mountain biker, a dab of toothpaste on your brakes gives a lot more stopping power.




    Ok I am gonna try that today [​IMG]
     
  12. Born2bwire
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Bill Ward
    diatomaceous earth

    BW




    Yeah I knew that too.... sigh... we're all losers aren't we?
     
  13. Bill Ward
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Born2bwire
    Yeah I knew that too.... sigh... we're all losers aren't we?



    How so?

    BW
     
  14. thrawn86
    I remember a service online somewhere that you could ship your cds off to and they would completely resurface the cd for a couple bucks each or something.
     
  15. Sphinx89
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by pne
    If you're a mountain biker, a dab of toothpaste on your brakes gives a lot more stopping power.



    really?

    might try that, my brakes are buggered. only had them sorted few months ago

    a minty fresh bike [​IMG]
     
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