The Official 64 Audio Thread | apex & tia Technologies
Sep 3, 2020 at 9:45 PM Post #13,111 of 19,029

Vitaly2017

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So.... how do the Fourte compare to the Trio? After hearing owning and hearing the Trio, I’d imagine it’s hard to beat. Is the Fourte an evolution or something totally different?


Depends which fourte you are referring to.
I had original fourte once and prefer the trio, now I have the fourte noir and its a winer over the trio...
Original fourte is very bright in treble and can be siblant not the noir tough

Noir --》trio --》 fourte Original my preference not to be considered as best to least
 
Sep 3, 2020 at 9:55 PM Post #13,112 of 19,029

rantng

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I find it a little strange as they just released the premium silver cable in 2 pons so I assume the new stock premium cable with new connector is the same stock premium cable with new connector simply.

But what if we want new premium silver cable with the new connector? Means you are locked to the stock cable for ever?
A little strange unless they intend to make that option for the premium silver as well.

The IPX connection is geared more towards professionals in the music industry so you won't find the multiple cable options/cable rolling that you find in the audiophile market. It's marketed as being more durable/resilient more than for it's "tuning" properties.
 
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Sep 3, 2020 at 9:56 PM Post #13,113 of 19,029

Deezel177

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Ummm a new connector? Like The square one at Fir audio?

Echoing @rantng's post, it isn't new. It's currently a standard used by the likes of Ultimate Ears and InEarz.

The connectors are not currently easily available, and neither are the FiR RCX connectors. I assume it will take a while (if it all)
JH 7 pin is also not available anywhere I can find yet,

This is exactly what I meant with my post. What I was trying to say was, now that a "bigger" brand like 64 Audio have picked up IPX, it'll hopefully encourage companies like Eidolic, Pentaconn, Oyaide, etc. to come out with higher quantities and more premium builds of the IPX plugs to use with aftermarket cables. And, it'll also encourage newer designs like the right-angled form factor that 64 showed off in their video. The only IPX plugs I've seen thus far from, say, Null Audio have looked pretty basic and bare; definitely unideal for more high-end IEMs and aftermarket cables.

I think this exact problem is what's holding back OEMs from similarly adopting the RCX and the 7-pin standards. They're currently only used by one company with comparatively limited demand for aftermarket cables, so they don't see the need to devote resources for them yet. Once FiR's in-ears become more popular among cable-rolling audiophiles (which I'm confident they will) and JH phases in the 7-pin connector to more of their products (or, better yet, more details are unveiled as to what the 7 pins are for, i.e. their rumoured DSP system), then I'm sure we'll see more adoption of these standards among OEMs and upgrade-cable brands.

UltimateEars and others are already using the IPX connector and there are several aftermarket cables. However, I have always understood that these connectors spin freely, wear out, and develop “works if it holds right” problems. Yet in 64Audio‘s video, IPX connectors are portrayed as being more robust for musicians who sweat and perform on stage with one monitor out. It’s interesting they acknowledge the 2-Pin connector as being a favorite among audiophiles perhaps only because of the abundance of aftermarket options. For me it’s too early to know which of the two connectors is best—personally I’d pick the one that is less prone to failing in a way that damages the CIEM.

I'm aware that other companies have used it in the past. But, now that a more mainstream (among musicians, anyway) brand like 64 Audio are picking them up, it'll hopefully prompt OEMs like the ones I mentioned above to come out with better-looking, better-made and more comfortably-shaped plugs for the IPX standard. Also, it'll hopefully encourage upgrade-cable makers like Effect Audio or Eletech to adopt it as one of their standard options. I have quite a bit of experience with the IPX standard through my UE LIVE. It definitely does not spin freely. In fact, that's one of my favourite qualities about it over similar standards like MMCX. After numerous plugs and unplugs, it hasn't loosened one bit. So, I'm definitely for the standard. The only thing it has against it is what we're talking about right now: Limited adoption among brands and OEMs relative to mainstays like 2-pin. Like I said, hopefully, 64's adoption of the standard here will resolve this.

I find it a little strange as they just released the premium silver cable in 2 pons so I assume the new stock premium cable with new connector is the same stock premium cable with new connector simply.

But what if we want new premium silver cable with the new connector? Means you are locked to the stock cable for ever?
A little strange unless they intend to make that option for the premium silver as well.

Personally, I think it makes perfect sense. Keep the premium silver cable on the 2-pin standard, because it's the standard most audiophiles prefer/already have, and they're the demographic most likely to pay for a premium silver cable to maximise their signal chain. And, give the stock cables the IPX standard, because it's preferred for on-stage use, and professionals would care more about durability and water-resistance than minute bottlenecks in the signal chain (as if the mic packs and monitor mixers they're plugging them into aren't big enough bottlenecks to fidelity already). Plus, they're less likely to want to shell out the cash for a premium silver cable anyway.
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 1:55 AM Post #13,115 of 19,029

gLer

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I have the Ultimate Ears Live with the IPX connectors, they don't spin freely.

They have, so far, proved to be very reliable. The bax cable itself is very thin and light.

All in all I find it to be a good combination.

I have the Trio and Nio. If IPX were an option I would have gone for it fwiw.
I'd love to get your thoughts on Nio and Trio. Do they complement each other, and what do you prefer or dislike about one over the other?
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 2:07 AM Post #13,116 of 19,029

Deezel177

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So where does MMCX sit in all of this? Seems like CA are really the only 'known' brand using it (unless you count Meze), and IPX seems like a similar but more robust version.

Considering the sheer amount of SE215's out in the world, I think Shure still holds the most stock as far as MMCX is concerned. In the more niche, enthusiast space, it likely is Campfire. Sony used a slightly-modified form of MMCX (with a locking collar) for their XBA line, though I'm not entirely sure what their M and IER series currently use. Speaking of FiR Audio, their metal-shelled universal IEMs use MMCX as well. I've been told they were planning to use RCX, but decided to go with MMCX instead due to community feedback. I assume people wanted a less proprietary standard, so they won't have to reterminate all their cables just to use with FiR's in-ears. You also have brands like Audiofly, Final Audio and Kumitate Lab using the standard, among others. So, it's still very much commonplace.

IPX definitely looks to be more robust. MMCX is pretty much known to breakdown after one-too-many cable swaps due to dirt and debris getting between the contacts. I don't know whether or not changes have been made to its design to compensate for that. But, in any case, IPX definitely isn't anywhere near common enough to dethrone MMCX any time soon.
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 2:18 AM Post #13,117 of 19,029

mvvRAZ

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Considering the sheer amount of SE215's out in the world, I think Shure still holds the most stock as far as MMCX is concerned. In the more niche, enthusiast space, it likely is Campfire. Sony used a slightly-modified form of MMCX (with a locking collar) for their XBA line, though I'm not entirely sure what their M and IER series currently use. Speaking of FiR Audio, their metal-shelled universal IEMs use MMCX as well. I've been told they were planning to use RCX, but decided to go with MMCX instead due to community feedback. I assume people wanted a less proprietary standard, so they won't have to reterminate all their cables just to use with FiR's in-ears. You also have brands like Audiofly, Final Audio and Kumitate Lab using the standard, among others. So, it's still very much commonplace.

IPX definitely looks to be more robust. MMCX is pretty much known to breakdown after one-too-many cable swaps due to dirt and debris getting between the contacts. I don't know whether or not changes have been made to its design to compensate for that. But, in any case, IPX definitely isn't anywhere near common enough to dethrone MMCX any time soon.
I think FiR only use MMCX in Asia from what I’ve heard. In the USA the M5s I’ve seen (and the one I had) use their RCX
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 2:21 AM Post #13,118 of 19,029

Deezel177

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I think FiR only use MMCX in Asia from what I’ve heard. In the USA the M5s I’ve seen (and the one I had) use their RCX

Ahh, I see. That's understandable, given the fact that cable-rolling and tweaking is generally more common in Asia.
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 2:31 AM Post #13,119 of 19,029

mvvRAZ

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Ahh, I see. That's understandable, given the fact that cable-rolling and tweaking is generally more common in Asia.
I’ll write up a full rant on connectors at some point, but I feel like a lot of companies complain about all the limitations of 2pin while not actually using quality sockets. Of everything I’ve owned, there are 3 companies who’s sockets I’ve found to be particularly good, and for the audiophile community, make any kind of proprietary connector flat out useless, those being:

64, Itsfit, MMR

I totally understand offering IPX for stage musicians, but a lot of the claims around 2pin inferiority are to me a result of most companies using mediocre to terrible sockets more so than an actual issue with the connection
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 3:00 AM Post #13,120 of 19,029

gLer

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I totally understand offering IPX for stage musicians, but a lot of the claims around 2pin inferiority are to me a result of most companies using mediocre to terrible sockets more so than an actual issue with the connection
And people roughing them. These are delicate, precision, HIGH VALUE devices and should be treated as such. Throw them in your bag, drop them on a hard desk or use them in inclement weather and suffer the consequences.
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 3:05 AM Post #13,121 of 19,029

mvvRAZ

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And people roughing them. These are delicate, precision, HIGH VALUE devices and should be treated as such. Throw them in your bag, drop them on a hard desk or use them in inclement weather and suffer the consequences.
I think 64 IEMs can take a fair bit of punishment and usually it’s fine if you use a cable that you don’t mind throwing away sooner or later. What I don’t get is someone using like a 900$ Leo 2 with their 2000$ IEMs and going for a sweaty jog first thing in the morning in the blazing sun and then going like “EA you made my cable stiff”
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 4:49 AM Post #13,123 of 19,029

SteveKiwi

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I'd love to get your thoughts on Nio and Trio. Do they complement each other, and what do you prefer or dislike about one over the other?
It's an interesting question,
To me I think they complement each other.

The Trio's are probably technically superior but in all honesty I use the Nio's more often.

I find the Nio to be a smooth and natural listening experience whereas the Trio's come across as more detailed.

That said the Nio's have details in spades, their magic to me is how they layer those details, they are the first set of iem's (prior to getting the Odin) that actually sound holographic to me.
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 5:00 AM Post #13,124 of 19,029

gLer

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It's an interesting question,
To me I think they complement each other.

The Trio's are probably technically superior but in all honesty I use the Nio's more often.

I find the Nio to be a smooth and natural listening experience whereas the Trio's come across as more detailed.

That said the Nio's have details in spades, their magic to me is how they layer those details, they are the first set of iem's (prior to getting the Odin) that actually sound holographic to me.
Many thanks, great feedback. The Nio is the smoothest IEM I've heard to date, which suits the majority of my listening preferences (kick back and relax) to a T. Still, I'm going to audition Trio to see how it might work for the odd occasion I want more energy in my music, or feel like exploring the finer details in the recording (whereas Nio is all about cohesiveness and non-fatiguing musicality).
 
Sep 4, 2020 at 7:50 AM Post #13,125 of 19,029

krack2222

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I absolutely do agree with you.
'smooth', 'kick back and relax' is what the Nio are for, in my opinion.

Trio and Noir will make you foot tap, dance and/or sing.

U12t will transport you to the live concert.
 

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