The most reliable/easiest way to EQ headphones properly to achieve the most ideal sound (for non-professionals)
Apr 26, 2020 at 12:42 PM Post #241 of 262

Lunatique

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Oh, the price is not as high as I thought.
Would this one work?
https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/ECM8000--behringer-ecm8000-measurement-condenser-microphone

So basically I use the above measuring microphone instead of my normal one, and then just apply some light EQ for whatever purposes I need, correct?
Can you describe what you're trying to achieve? I'm assuming you want to use the mic to do recordings (voice, instrument), and then you're going to apply EQ to mimic the sonic signature of other microphones with desirable characteristics? If that's what you are trying to do, I wonder if it's just as feasible to simply EQ your current mic to be flat, then apply the emulation EQ curve. But that might not be necessary--I'll explain later.

The difference between applying EQ to headphones and to microphones, is that one is playback gear, and one is recording gear. One is free from room mode and acoustics issues, and one is not. This makes microphones a lot more complicated. Your mic placement in your recording space and whether the space is acoustically treated will have impact on your recording. The type of mic you use and the mic pattern you choose (some mics allow you to switch the pattern) will also affect the results. There are things you can do like using a mic shielding baffle, treating your room, etc., to get as clean of a recording as possible.

Very often the most desirable mics used in recording studios are not necessarily the flat sounding ones. Recording engineers choose mics and mic-preamps according to their coloration, and match them to different needs. For example, often a warm sounding mic is desirable for certain vocals, or certain mics are used to mic the bass drum, some are better for cymbals, or for the toms, or the snare. Some are great for amped electric guitar but not for acoustic guitar, and so on. If professional microphones are all just flat this wouldn't be the case. So depending on what you're trying to do, ultimately, you need to know what characteristic you are after and why. But if you know that, then you can simply just EQ that tone yourself based on the need. But I suppose if you want to save time, you can get one of those mic emulation plugins and choose among the models they have in the presets. But going that route, I'm assuming it'll be easier if the mic you're recording with is one that's a very popular and ubiquitous model, as those plugins likely will be basing their emulation on those very popular mics as the starting point. You'll need to check out the specifics of those plugins to be sure.
 
Apr 26, 2020 at 1:21 PM Post #242 of 262

deama

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Can you describe what you're trying to achieve? I'm assuming you want to use the mic to do recordings (voice, instrument), and then you're going to apply EQ to mimic the sonic signature of other microphones with desirable characteristics? If that's what you are trying to do, I wonder if it's just as feasible to simply EQ your current mic to be flat, then apply the emulation EQ curve. But that might not be necessary--I'll explain later.

The difference between applying EQ to headphones and to microphones, is that one is playback gear, and one is recording gear. One is free from room mode and acoustics issues, and one is not. This makes microphones a lot more complicated. Your mic placement in your recording space and whether the space is acoustically treated will have impact on your recording. The type of mic you use and the mic pattern you choose (some mics allow you to switch the pattern) will also affect the results. There are things you can do like using a mic shielding baffle, treating your room, etc., to get as clean of a recording as possible.

Very often the most desirable mics used in recording studios are not necessarily the flat sounding ones. Recording engineers choose mics and mic-preamps according to their coloration, and match them to different needs. For example, often a warm sounding mic is desirable for certain vocals, or certain mics are used to mic the bass drum, some are better for cymbals, or for the toms, or the snare. Some are great for amped electric guitar but not for acoustic guitar, and so on. If professional microphones are all just flat this wouldn't be the case. So depending on what you're trying to do, ultimately, you need to know what characteristic you are after and why. But if you know that, then you can simply just EQ that tone yourself based on the need. But I suppose if you want to save time, you can get one of those mic emulation plugins and choose among the models they have in the presets. But going that route, I'm assuming it'll be easier if the mic you're recording with is one that's a very popular and ubiquitous model, as those plugins likely will be basing their emulation on those very popular mics as the starting point. You'll need to check out the specifics of those plugins to be sure.
Oh right ok, thanks.
 
Apr 27, 2020 at 12:26 AM Post #243 of 262

Lunatique

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Jul 9, 2020 at 4:04 PM Post #245 of 262

Metalomaniac

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I'd like to delve deeper into this to get my 2nd dan black belt in audiophilia, but I'm not sure my gear is suitable. I have Hiby R5 Android DAP. It doesn't have a parametric EQ. I listen almost exclusively on Spotify, which doesn't have one, either.

Any options?
 
Jul 9, 2020 at 5:02 PM Post #246 of 262

bigshot

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The biggest problem is finding a decent equalizer. I don't think they make a good one for a portable rig- only a home setup. Probably because they figure no one really cares about fine tuning sound quality when they're in the street or on a train. For home use, MiniDSP makes some good stuff. I have one of their units on my wish list. If you find something useful, let me know.
 
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Oct 23, 2020 at 10:46 AM Post #250 of 262

Joe Bloggs

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I'd like to delve deeper into this to get my 2nd dan black belt in audiophilia, but I'm not sure my gear is suitable. I have Hiby R5 Android DAP. It doesn't have a parametric EQ. I listen almost exclusively on Spotify, which doesn't have one, either.

Any options?
Yes! R Android players now have a Convolver function which lets you modify your audio output with an impulse response. If you EQ a base impulse with a parametric EQ on your computer, you can then use this on the R5. Details here near the bottom of the post: https://www.head-fi.org/threads/r5-a-new-android-dap-by-hiby.912566/page-209#post-15892903
 
Nov 12, 2020 at 5:38 PM Post #251 of 262

rmsanger

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Hoping to get some advice:

I currently have a variety of headphones that I source from my turntable and Fiio X7 DAP. I don't use a pc connection so using a windows based eq won't work. I also don't want to get something like an RME ADI-2 pro dac that has a built in EQ as I already have an R2R dac that I love. Finally the Fiio X7 has a built in eq function but it requires you to use the onboard dac; if you switch to lineout via Coax it overrides any onboard eq settings.

So that leaves me with adding a new piece of hardware into my chain specifically for eq functionality. I could go something like this:

Pioneer GR-860 graphic Equalizer - https://classifieds.ksl.com/listing/61796700
Schiit Loki - https://www.schiit.com/products/loki
Bellari Audio Exciter - https://www.amazon.com/Bellari-SE560-Sonic-Exciter-Enhancer/dp/B07FDQLVTY
Bellari EQ570 - https://www.amazon.com/Bellari-Audio-EQ570-Equalizer/dp/B07PPQ3XWM


But I want to be careful an not introduce anything detrimental into the sound-chain like THD as I've already got a pretty clean setup. Does anyone have any advice or suggestions on these or other options?
 
Nov 13, 2020 at 2:26 PM Post #252 of 262

bigshot

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I wouldn't worry about distortion with a digital EQ. Just pick the one with the most flexible features (parametric with the most bands).
 
Nov 13, 2020 at 3:18 PM Post #253 of 262

rmsanger

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Nov 13, 2020 at 3:20 PM Post #254 of 262

bigshot

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That isn't a digital EQ. That is analog. And it isn't a parametric equalizer. It's graphic. You want a digital parametric equalizer. The other ones you've linked to aren't really equalizers. They're fancy tone controls. You want something like a MiniDSP. You'll need to figure out what kind of digital in and out you can use with your DAP. It might get complicated.

For your turntable, you're stuck because it is analogue. The best quality analogue EQ you can get would be best for that. I have a RANE myself but DBX makes good ones too. A dual channel 31 band would work well. But you are going to need to raise the output of your turntable to line level to run it through the equalizer. You could take line level out of your DAP and run it through a good analog equalizer too. It wouldn't be optimal, but it would work.

Someone else might know of a portable equalizer. I've always wanted one, but haven't found anything I liked yet.
 
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Nov 13, 2020 at 3:53 PM Post #255 of 262

rmsanger

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Could you make a few suggestions then of a digital parametric eq or minidsp you would recommend?
 

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