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Oct 12, 2021 at 11:05 AM Post #16 of 22
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Why might you decide to mod a pair of headphones? Well, when you purchase headphones, you may not always be satisfied with the way they are — whether it’s how they look, feel around your head, sound, etc.

Modding allows you to break the limitations of your headphones and turn them into the ideal pair of headphones that suits your specific needs. Modding can be a very fun and rewarding experience when trying out new ways to improve the comfort, sound, and/or look of your favorite pair of cans.

Headphone modding can take on many forms — whether it’s replacing your earpads, headbands, or cables, adding filters or padding inside the ear cups, and utilizing 3D printers to construct certain components or even entire headphones.

However, for this first post within our new headphone modding series, we’ll dive into earpad swapping and how this modification can improve the comfort and quality of your listening experience.

If you’d like to watch a video on this topic, you can check out our Dekoni U video where we discuss earpad swapping and how this can affect your listening experience.

What Is Earpad Swapping?​

swapping earpads


If you’re not satisfied with the standard earpads that come with your headphones, or if your current earpads are damaged and worn out, you can swap them out with different ones. This is a relatively quick and easy way to improve the comfort and/or sound of your headphones.

Depending on the headphones, this can be a very simple twist and turn process involving minimal effort. However, for the more stubborn standard earpads that come with certain headphones, make sure to take your time in order to prevent damaging your headphones.

What Are Replacement Earpads?​

Earpads


Replacement earpads are made with an array of different materials, each offering different forms of comfort and potentially different sound signatures.

Inside the earpads, you can find materials such as regular foam, memory foam, and cooling gel. The foam inside the replacement pads can offer more support and density, allowing for more comfort around your ears while listening to music.

The cooling gel is a great material for reducing the heat of your earpads after using your headphones for extended periods of time. If you’re looking to stream your favorite video game for several hours straight, make sure you’re rocking with a pair of earpads with some cooling gel so you can stay focused on the game.

Outside the earpad, you’ll find different materials such as velour, suede, leather, protein leather, and many more. Some materials may work better than others depending on the type of headphones you own and your personal preference.

Once you have your new earpads on, do some listening tests and you may find that the earpads not only improve the comfort of your headphones but can also affect the sound signature of your music. Some common differences you can expect are changes in the low-frequency content, such as the bass and sub-bass region, or even changes in the higher frequency ranges where the air or sibilance is.

The sound of your headphones can also be affected by the different sizes and shapes of the replacement earpads. Your new pads can potentially alter the distance between your ear and the driver, increasing or decreasing acoustic impedance. Some pads come with bigger ear holes for a better fit and this can either bring your ear closer or further away from the driver. This change in distance can change the way certain frequencies interact within the new space, which may affect the way your music sounds.

Earpads can also be flat or round in shape. The flat earpads create more surface area around your ear, which can seal your ear better. On the contrary, rounded may not seal as well, but you may find it more comfortable. However, typically, neither shape will drastically affect the sound of your headphones.

If you’re looking to replace your earpads for simply cosmetic purposes and not so much for sound or comfort, you can get customizable pads. You can purchase pads with different colors or designs to make them pop. This can easily turn your regular headphones into something that’s a little more you.

Conclusion​

Hopefully, you were able to gain a better understanding of earpad swapping and how it can affect the quality of your listening experience. Earpads are a very important component and can either make or break the quality of your headphones.

In future posts, we’ll go over more ways you can modify your headphones, so you can learn how to fully optimize your favorite pair of cans without needing to purchase new ones.

If you’re interested in replacing your earpads, check us out at Dekoniaudio.com where we provide high-quality replacement earpads for audiophile, gaming, and pro audio headphones. We offer an array of earpads for some of the most well-known and high-quality headphone brands in the market space — such as Sennheiser, Beyerdynamic, and Audio Technica.

At Dekoni Audio, we strive to produce products that balance comfort with sound and cater to the communities that know quality when they see it.
 
Dekoni Audio Stay updated on Dekoni Audio at their sponsor profile on Head-Fi.
 
Dekoni Audio @dekoniaudio http://www.dekoniaudio.com sales@dekoniaudio.com
Oct 12, 2021 at 5:56 PM Post #19 of 22

Raketen

Headphoneus Supremus
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@DekoniAudio Are there comparative measurements of your front filter foams anywhere? I saw some flash by (I think from T50RP) in the promo video but I think a graph or acoustic impedance spec for included materials on the product page would be helpful.
 
Oct 12, 2021 at 10:20 PM Post #20 of 22

SeEnCreaTive

500+ Head-Fier
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Oct 6, 2014
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Started with t50rp, ended with open alphas, making my own wave guides I'm sure some people know me from that thread. Fun challenge to try and think about how sound works, even though I have 0 education on the subject. I still love those cans, however my dalies are now the Ether CX of course.
 
Oct 13, 2021 at 12:15 PM Post #21 of 22
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@DekoniAudio Are there comparative measurements of your front filter foams anywhere? I saw some flash by (I think from T50RP) in the promo video but I think a graph or acoustic impedance spec for included materials on the product page would be helpful.
Currently making adjustments to headphone rig, I can get you some measurements hopefully next week.
 
Dekoni Audio Stay updated on Dekoni Audio at their sponsor profile on Head-Fi.
 
Dekoni Audio @dekoniaudio http://www.dekoniaudio.com sales@dekoniaudio.com
Oct 13, 2021 at 12:16 PM Post #22 of 22
Joined
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Location
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Started with t50rp, ended with open alphas, making my own wave guides I'm sure some people know me from that thread. Fun challenge to try and think about how sound works, even though I have 0 education on the subject. I still love those cans, however my dalies are now the Ether CX of course.
We have 3D printers, we mess around with wave guides. Its interesting science trying to control the movement of sound from a driver to your ear.
 
Dekoni Audio Stay updated on Dekoni Audio at their sponsor profile on Head-Fi.
 
Dekoni Audio @dekoniaudio http://www.dekoniaudio.com sales@dekoniaudio.com

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