Tell me if this would work (as a possible DIY dj mixer).
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massappeal85

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Recently I came across a simple passive line mixer circuit published here. Then I searched a little more and found this circuit for a crossfader.

My question to those of you that actually know what your doing, is with some possible modifications (one circuit is passive while the crossfader has an opamp, not sure what thats gonna mean if anything) would it be possible to combine some version of these 2 circuits to create some functional dj mixer?

If yes, I would have to add a headphone output that could select from 2 different channels, which could just be a bare bones cmoy with channel switcher, but I thought I'd see if this would work first before I got way ahead of myself.

And if you couldn't tell, I'm very much a newbie at alot of this. I'm just curious if this would work, or if someone could help me MAKE it work.

Thanks, PEACE.
 
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blip

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I'll cautiously say that I don't see why not.

I believe that you could wire both of them up as passive circuits. Put the passive crossfader on each of the inputs then connect the crossfaded outputs to the line mixer. I would also put an opamp of some kind in the circuit (though I don't think its absolutely necessary) to maintain signal strength and bring the output up to a good level.

More experienced DIYers: Am I missing something that would preven this from working?
 
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rohitbd

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Hi, I would absolutely recommend using a line amplifier after (or before, if possible) the mixer, since a purely passive mixer will have problems of loading esp. at it's o/p in addition to the inherent signall loss that it has. In fact an op-amp adder can be used for better performance instead of a simple resistive mixer...
 
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PinkFloyd

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Quote:

Originally posted by rohitbd
Hi, I would absolutely recommend using a line amplifier after (or before, if possible) the mixer, since a purely passive mixer will have problems of loading esp. at it's o/p in addition to the inherent signall loss that it has. In fact an op-amp adder can be used for better performance instead of a simple resistive mixer...


Yep...... I agree

pinkie
 
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