***SWBF2cheaters RANT. Stop the nonsense. My journey as a Reviewer has come to an end***
post-7640030
Thread Starter
Post #1 of 65

swbf2cheater

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
5,045
Reaction score
120
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Posts
5,045
Likes
120
They say great audio is built on the shoulders of giants...well,not here.  Here at Head-Fi all of our audio needs are built from scratch!  No hand holding here, no sir.  Audiophiles do not ask why...they ask WHY NOT!? Why are most of our headphones so expensive?  Well, why not marry cheap headphones if you love them so much, thats what I say.  In fact, why not invent a special cheapskate door that won't hit you on the butt on the way out!   Fair warning to those reading this guide, it involves small amounts of time travel so if you happen to meet yourself during the course of reading this post, please do not make eye contact...the lab boys tell me that will wipe out time...
 
 
This is my rant to the community and I thought I would share a few key points I have learned over the past 15 years of my audiophile journey.  I wish to share my experiences and knowledge with the beginner audiophiles and to rant a little about how badly some people are getting ripped off in the audio world. 
 
Let Mortal Audio Kombat BEGIN! 
 
 
A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away there once lived a young boy named Mike.  I spent my days studying the arts and music, focusing mostly on guitar and jazz in general.  I grew up in a musical house and learned to play a few different instruments over the years but came to love and regard the guitar above all else.  In those early days, before the internet
 ( whoa, I know right? )  there really weren't many hi fi grade headphones.  I came to love audio and found myself addicted heavily to the dynamics produced by my cheap headphones.  *click clack over there, another sound over here, violins stage right, cellos stage left ect ect.  I became agitated by this when I was still in grade school, roughly 8-10 years old.  Something nagged in my ears and drove me mad! I needed a more dynamic and vast experience and it wasn't until my later years in high school when I learned real Hi Fi Audio even existed.
 
 
Why Can't Headphone Manufacturers get it right? 
 
 
I have a problem, its a small problem by the looks of things as I have only encountered a few people in the past decade and half who seem to agree with me regarding this...problem.  It seems like most headphone designers do not actually use their own headphones nor planned to.  There are a few companies that seem to care about the headband design, companies like Phiaton and Bose, but most really could care less if it makes you look like a radar dish or not.  Studio Monitors bother me.  Having some mixing experience, I really do not understand how anyone can slap STUDIO MONITORS on their box to describe headphones that have a massive headband that does not conform in the slightest to your head.   Do you really want to look like a satellite dish? Do you really want a thin strip of padding on the crown of your head that puts almost all the weight of the headphones right on the most sensitive part of your head?  I sure don't.  You would think that some brands would realize that a smaller headphone would not only drastically increase comfort qualities, but would also be that much cheaper to produce...as LESS MATERIAL is being used.  There are a hoard of great sounding sets that have solid 1/10 ratings for comfort and some that have headbands so large, you can stick your entire hand or arm through that gap between the side of your head and the headbands themselves.  This needs to stop.  There is no excuse for a massively heavy set of headphones that are branded as studio monitors, but have such a low level of comfort that you cannot ever use them.  Some mixing sessions last 12-18+ hours and I know a few sound editors who would never EVER wear these sets.  ( I do not want to name them, but its pretty easy to find out which ones I am speaking of )  No real editor would ever choose to wear these monsters on their noggins for more than half a day at a time by preference anyway.  Being force to is something I can understand, I've done it for the sake of the set in question sounding amazing...but these expensive sets by no means should EVER CAUSE PAIN...and a lot of them do.  Some brands care so little about you, that they make you go buy other brands earpads to be used on their set.  This is pure nonsense and inexcusable.  
 
This same problem applies to DJing.  No real DJ will ever wear a large and heavy set of headphones at a real gig.  If they did, they are terribly misinformed and need to be shown other sets out there that will make their job easier.  Some sets branded as DJ sets are not even remotely close to being useful in DJ settings, just as most studio monitors are not useful in the studio.  
 
The point of this section is for the beginners to not be swayed into buying a giant set for studio or DJ use just because they sound great.  As a former DJ, I feel victim to this bug and purchased hoards of "DJ" sets only to return them after a performance due to the lack of usefulness.  Too big, too clampy, uncomfortable...ect, ect.  My rant here is aimed also at the manufacturers.  Just because people buy some of your $500-1500 headphones doesn't mean they are perfect and that you need to ignore improvements on future models.  Nobody wants a giant set that looks like a satellite.  There is no reason for super thick headbands that are molded to never conform to a human head.  Its lazy design and there is no excuse for a $1000 set of headphones being uncomfortable in the slightest.  Newbies, Beware.  Just because they are expensive and sound amazing does not mean they were tailored for comfort.  Do your research, don't be afraid to ask questions to the experts here and ask for comfort comparisons.  Step up and complain to these companies for making you pay for poor designs that just happen to sound nice, this isn't 1953 or something, its 2011 and it is time the brand name companies realize some of their designs are just terrible and cost insane amounts of cash...why conform to them?  Make them conform to THE AUDIOPHILES AND CONSUMERS, I say. 
 
 
The Cable Quality MYTHS
 
Yes, Cable quality is important...but only to a certain degree and under specific conditions.  I have spent hundreds of Dollars on custom made "super quality" cables that were no different than a Fiio brand interconnect that sells for like $10-15.  The difference between very poor quality dollar store cables and moderately priced ( affordable cables, LODs and interconnects ) is much more broad than the moderately priced cable vs the expensive one.  I've come to realize it is a brand name, pride thing.  
Something to show off and say "I paid $300 for a custom cable" and not much else.  Yes, there are higher quality cables out there, but the applications one would need them for would be for recable jobs were the headphone connection points are either gold copper orr silver plated.  It would be wiser to go with the corresponding cable type that fits well with your connection point type.  Some headphones sound better with silver cables, some sound better without.  It is up to you to ask the questions if you want to recable your headphones for a slightly better experience.  I have found that if the cable is not terminated with a balanced pin of some type, the recable job is not worth it.  This is just my opinion and my experiences.  If you feel I am wrong, so be it.  I am going by what I have heard and only what I have heard.   If the recable job is done with a some type of silver cable of a higher quality and used with a balanced amp from a balanced source, odds are great you will hear a very noticeable difference.  Otherwise, I would skip it and only do a recable if the stock cable happens to have problems, is known to sound bad, or if you need a different length.  Thankfully, some headphones are easily recabled, most aren't.  Grado headphones are easy to recable, anyone with a basic understanding of soldering can do it once they acquire the proper cable.
Otherwise, leave it to a pro to do it for you if you choose to recable.
 
Proprietary cables are pure nonsense.  Recently, I came to love a specific set from a specific company.  My goodness the set sounds great but the detachable cable is junk.  It is specially made and there are no other cable heads like it that exist.  This company created an audiophile grade set of headphones that does not cater at all to audiophiles.  Basically, what they are saying is here is our headphone, too bad if the stock cable is crap you are stuck with it and nothing else in existence will work because we specially tailored the ground wires on the inside of the cable to only be compatible with this set of headphones....yet we still buy them willingly.  Things like this should stop.  There is no reason for an expensive set of headphones to have a craptastic quality cable that is not even replaceable...no excuses for this in the slightest.  
 
 
Amping
 
Believe it or not the most popular question I am asked about amping is "Why can't I just use a moderately priced amp" with these expensive headphones?"  
 
The answer to that is centered on clarity and dynamics more than power needs.  For example, the recent Fiio E11 portable amp is pretty great and can power loads of up to and around 250 ohms.  For such a small little thing, that is very impressive.  But it is not something I would ever use on an Ultrasone Edition 8 which costs upwards of $1700 US.  Even though the E11 is more than sufficient to drive ( power ) these headphones, it lacks the dynamics and overall clarity to keep up.  You will be downgrading your audio quality if you used a cheaper amp, or perhaps an amp that does not mesh with your needs, to be used with any one set of headphones.  
 
Do your research.  Some headphones sound very forward, meaning their presentation sounds like its very close to you.  Vocals are seemingly coming from inside your head.  This type of headphone should never be used with an amplifier that has a more distant presentation.  Can it be done?  Sure, of course it physically can, but why on earth would you want to?  You should try to find proper amping with a presentation that closely matches the type of headphones you are using.  Amps that are not too foward and not too distant work best for obvious reasons, as they will mesh well with both forward and a more distant sennheiser type of presentation.  
 
Yet another sub category here would be Solid State vs Tube Amps.  Some headphones simply sound better with tube amps than without. Again, you need to match things up as best as you can.  This is just my take on it all. Amping always improves the sound signature of any set of headphones even if they are easily driven and low impedance.  For example, my 9wave NW Studio earbuds have a massive soundstage and a very forward presentation out of just my Sansa Fuze mp3 player.  However, out of my Fiio E11 portable amp, the sound signature is noticeably less forward and the bass experience completely changed. This is due to this amp producing a middle range presentation, not too close and not too distant sounding.  When the same set is plugged into a larger full size amp, lets say my E9, The signature sounds terribly distant.  Separation of instruments significantly increases but the set sounds terrible with a distant sounding amplifier.  
 
Do your best to match things up before you buy. 
 
 
Burn In IS REAL
 
 
Anyone who says burn in is not real is lying to themselves and speaking pure nonsense. Burn in is a term we audio nerds use to describe a length of time it takes for your audio gear to sound their best.  Some headphones sound like trash out of the box but after some time some very subtle changes are made inside the circuitry.  These small changes will appear audible to your ears and your brand new headphones won't always sound the same as they will in the near future. 
 
My theory is based on the internal wiring.  I feel burn in is caused by the stock wiring learning to efficiently transfer electricity over time.  Just like breaking in a new car seat, or a baseball glove.  The material is the same, but after some time it becomes more pliable and more efficient to use.  The changes are small on a physical level but the small efficiency boost in the electricity being transferred around becomes audible to the human ear.  Sets like the Audio Technica WS70 was a night and day transformation to my ears from the day I got it to a few days later.  The actual presentation itself twisted from a box shape ( equally tall and wide sound ) to a very tall and narrow sound that was truly terrible.  
 
Cables and amps also have this effect.  Recording frequency response and its lack of change during said burn in periods are not valid ways to prove or deny the existence of burn in.  The responsiveness has almost nothing to do with burn in, your responsiveness will never change, but clarity and soundstaging will and does on many sets.  Again, this is my theory, if you don't like it...well that is just too bad so you'll have to deal with it :)
 
The point of this section is to not be underwhelmed by your new purchase, give it time, let your ears adjust to the new sounds coming at it.  Sonic adjustment inside of your brain and ears is also a part of burn in.  There are days when I want to vomit on my headphones because they just dont do it for me at that moment.  But the previous night or the next day I could come back to them and experience pure bliss.  
 
The Psychology 
 
 
TRUST YOUR EARS AND YOUR GUT! If you feel you will enjoy a specific set of headphones, odds are good you will despite them not being well liked by others.  My favorite set of all time is the Sennheiser HD485 which is low tier but even today it remains fun and satisfying to my ears, i enjoy the hell out of it and I won't let anyone tell me different.  Never let anyone sway you from something you want.  A big part of paying so much for Hi Fi gear is to enjoy it.  We audio junkies are in love with audio and I doubt there are any of us here that care at all if their friends dislike their choice set of headphones.  If you like them, screw everyone else.  Enjoy them!  Do your best to not allow that bug to bite you, try not to let any peer pressure make you return or exchange something you like.  I have done this so many times over my journey, I've lost count.  I fall victim to someone saying set A is better than set B for this or that reason, get rid of your set and try this one.
 
Make a checklist composed of the following things before you buy:
 
-Price:  If it is expensive WHO CARES! If you love it and want it, GO FOR IT.  Just make sure it comes with a return policy in case it is not for you. 
 
-Type: Open, Closed, Full size, Portable?
 
-Sound signature: What type of sound do you prefer? An upfront and engaging sound, or a smoother laid back, distant
type sound.  Is this a well rounded set that plays many genres well, or is it more well suited to play 1 genre extremely well, and other genres moderately well?
 
-Impedance: How easily driven are they?  Can it run well off just an mp3 player or will I need an amplifier? 
 
 
Trust yourselves, do research before you buy, ask questions.  This is what Head Fi is all about.  We are all here to help and enjoy helping you new players in this game.
 
 
This thread is just my rant to the community.  A last ditch effort to get some people riled up before I start my new job and will not be allowed to post reviews or give advice in regards to other brands.  Stand up for yourselves and don't let yourselves get conned so easily.  Ask questions, give these companies advice and pound them with it until they give you what you want. I know I am not the most popular user around here, it is not like my topics and reviews are well rated and received.  I tried my best to provide the world with accurate and honest reviews of all types.  My status as a reviewer has now come to and end and I plan to help change the world of audio in the near future.  I am a designer by heart and hobby and will be working for a new audio company from now on.  Thank you to those who followed me during my time here, but my time as a reviewer has officially come to an end.  Hopefully, I have helped and inspired more people than I am aware of.  Where would I be without Head-Fi?  
 
Fight the power!  :)
 
-mike 
 
 
 
 
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640101
Post #2 of 65

jammerlee711

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Aug 9, 2010
Messages
138
Reaction score
12
Joined
Aug 9, 2010
Posts
138
Likes
12
what job are you hving that stop you from posting?!
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640139
Post #3 of 65

Arleus

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 23, 2011
Messages
111
Reaction score
15
Joined
May 23, 2011
Posts
111
Likes
15
I wouldn't say that big headphones are less comfortable than small ones. My experience is the opposite, and I suspect that the majority of people would agree with me. Moreover, what's wrong with looking stupid if it's in your own home, or in the studio? Unless you sit, staring longingly into your own eyes in a mirror while you listen to music, why do you care what you look like? And if that's the case, you've got bigger problems than the looks of your headphones.
 
As for burn-in for headphones, surely whatever changes there are will be much more likely to come from the mechanical driver loosening up, rather than the electronics changing? When talking about testing cables for burn-in, finding the frequency response function should tell you a lot. If you take a signal, then take the Fourier transform of that signal, you get the FRF. No information is lost during this process, and the original signal can be entirely reconstructed by applying the inverse Fourier transform to it - it is simply a different way of presenting the same data. At least, that's true with continuous periodic data - things are a bit more 'dark art' if you're working with discretised non-periodic data, then you end up going down the road of Welch's method, and suddenly you no longer trust your results. So, if you don't trust numerical Fourier transforms, and prefer working in the time-domain, you can always do null-tests. I'm sure that an hour or two in Audacity and GNU-Octave, with a very basic understanding in engineering maths, will give you some meaningful results.
 
Anyway, this is turning into a rant of my own. To balance things out I should say that, for the most part, I agree with your rant - headphones should be comfortable, expensive cables make no difference, matching amps (especially ones with high output impedance) to headphones is difficult, and don't let other people tell you that you shouldn't like your headphones, when you clearly do. 
 
edited for scientific accuracy
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640313
Post #4 of 65

dxps26

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Aug 30, 2010
Messages
150
Reaction score
65
Location
New York
Joined
Aug 30, 2010
Location
New York
Posts
150
Likes
65
That sounds like you let off a LOT of steam. I too, would like to ask-why no more reviews?
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640373
Post #5 of 65

redwarrior191

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Feb 23, 2011
Messages
191
Reaction score
12
Joined
Feb 23, 2011
Posts
191
Likes
12
i appreciate your post here, although i do not agree with several points that you've made there, especially about burn in..
but i don't think i would debate with you here.. however, why are you gonna stop reviewing? are you becoming a MOT??
 
PS. I think i know what you are referring to when you mentioned "that" headphone that have detachable cable but incompatible with other cables.. lol
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640646
Post #6 of 65

Nagasaki_Kid

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Messages
907
Reaction score
17
Joined
Jun 14, 2007
Posts
907
Likes
17
I'm pretty sure that since he's going to work at an audio company it would be a conflict of interest to post reviews. Even if he does post reviews it would be debated if he was objective enough since he would be working at an audio company. Thank for your service to the community, I've enjoyed reading your past reviews.
 
     Share This Post       
post-7640836
Post #7 of 65

swbf2cheater

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
5,045
Reaction score
120
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Posts
5,045
Likes
120
Thanks guys, that means a lot! :)
 
If I am going to work for audio company A, I definitely can't do reviews on any other brands gear.  Possibly sway potential buyers away from said company and say something about another company that they might not like.  It would be like Burger King reviewing McDonalds burgers on a 3rd party website or something...its a law suit waiting to happen! haha.  
 
  
 
     Share This Post       
post-7642352
Post #8 of 65

Uncle Erik

Uncle Exotic
Joined
Mar 18, 2006
Messages
22,597
Reaction score
494
Joined
Mar 18, 2006
Posts
22,597
Likes
494
First, congrats on the new job! Hope it goes great! Let us know when you need a MOT tag.

Second, low impedance doesn't mean something is easy to drive. Look at the Apogee Scintilla, with a 1.2 Ohm impedance. It can overheat and literally melt lesser amps. Impedance, output impedance, sensitivity, and power are in a complicated dance. Impedance doesn't mean much by itself. It's like saying 150HP is fast. But 150HP in a bus and 150HP in a motorcycle are very different things. You have to look at the other factors before you really know.
 
     Share This Post       
post-7642394
Post #9 of 65

yashu

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Nov 1, 2009
Messages
210
Reaction score
20
Joined
Nov 1, 2009
Posts
210
Likes
20
 
Quote:
As for burn-in for headphones, surely whatever changes there are will be much more likely to come from the mechanical driver loosening up, rather than the electronics changing? 
 
I agree, and was also going to say something like this. The part about magic immesurable changes in the wire's conductivity behavior seems a little, I don't know, perhaps a logical concession? If high-dollar cables are to have burn-in effect, then one must assume that the process isn't mechanical... at least, that is what my guess would be to this direction of thought. It just seems far more likely that burn-in is mechanical.
 
Overall, though, it was an interesting read. I don't mind looking like what other people might call strange (it's not strange to me, so while it is a subjective thing, I can see why others would come to the conclusion that they are strange looking), but I agree 100% that a $1000 headphone, or even a $500 dollar headphone, should never cause you pain to simply wear. Comfort can't be that hard to get mostly right! The modifications we invent to improve comfort would probably cost a manufacturer just north of nil... know what I mean?
 
I also wanted to elaborate on the great point brought up about peer pressure. Peer pressure can be the cause of many regrettable purchases too. I can think of a couple headphones I bought in the past due to this logic: Audiophile literature is giving almost universal praise... I am an audiophile too! This means the headphones are designed for MY tastes!
 
It is just as bad to purchase based on peer pressure as it is to sell because of it. It is probably worse, since it sucks more to lose money than it does to get some of it back... heh.
 
     Share This Post       
post-7642461
Post #10 of 65

fatcat28037

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Messages
5,687
Reaction score
100
Location
Denver, NC, 20mi. NNW of Charlotte.
Joined
Jan 6, 2007
Location
Denver, NC, 20mi. NNW of Charlotte.
Posts
5,687
Likes
100
WOW! Do you feel better now? quite the rant. I agree with what you wrote except burn-in, I believe it's in the listeners head, not the gear. Good luck in your new job..
 
     Share This Post       
post-7644131
Post #11 of 65

svyr

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jun 8, 2009
Messages
3,432
Reaction score
481
Joined
Jun 8, 2009
Posts
3,432
Likes
481
I was going to abstain, but then reading your post it struck me as a bit overly-romanticized, so I decided to interject :D


>Why Can't Headphone Manufacturers get it right?

I mostly buy closed HP, and I've had numerous comfort issues with them. The worst offenders are headbands (narrow, angled to cut in sharply, not adjustable enough, not breathable, bear like grip, no grip, etc), followed by earcups/pads (too thin, poor dampening on the cups and resonances/distortion, ears touch the driver or mesh in front of it, completely stuffy). I wholeheartedly agree that almost none of the manufacturers seem to care much about ergonomics and long term comfort and just slap PoS together to look good and rely on BS marketing and it looking pretty to flog it... I also think the problem is aggravated for closed cans. Even worse, a lot of close cans have wooden cups (add really heavy to the above headband problems) and the dampening/pads are horrid, making them sound absolutely dreadful resonance and distortion wise.



>-Impedance: How easily driven are they? Can it run well off just an mp3 player or will I need an amplifier?

I'd caution on buying a set with a large impedance mismatch between amp out and the HP or IEMs... You will get nasty FR issues.



>TRUST YOUR EARS AND YOUR GUT!

Do not trust yourself. At least do some blind testing (get a frieeeend, they help :) ). Also, you need to at least try some gear as a point of reference. Go to a meet, you may find your system produces horrible distortion and is horribly colored and you've never noticed it before for lack of reference...and you no longer want that after hearing XYZ gear...


>Burn In IS REAL

I disagree. Personal exp + tyll's measurements on the subject leave me convinced the differences are pretty minor (<0.5db), questionably repeatable, and potentially attributable to a range of other factors (positioning, amp warm up/temp changes/etc), and it's mostly psychological.
Hell, I used to hate a set of particular IEMs, then I got GMP450Pro double padded to use at work, which sound similar (needed hp, didn't like GMP, but had no money for anything else :D)..And look after weeks of listening to that sound, I no longer hate the sound and find it pleasing (relatively recessed mids and accentuated treble and bass, vs previously being a mids hump fan). A week ago I got to try the IEMs again, and they sound pretty good, or at the very least I no longer want to burn them with cleansing fire (it's a custom universal demo, so it's been used for months and months and months, and gets regularly checked out for being screwed by customers). This is clearly psychological. The headphones didn't just magically grow a +3-6db 1k-3k mids bump that I like over the course of me not hearing them for a few months :D ...
 
     Share This Post       
post-7644172
Post #12 of 65

Katun

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Messages
3,229
Reaction score
134
Location
Washington
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Location
Washington
Posts
3,229
Likes
134
Edit and press backspace 4 times...

 
Interesting write up. An enjoyable read.
 
     Share This Post       
post-7644239
Post #14 of 65

swbf2cheater

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
5,045
Reaction score
120
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Posts
5,045
Likes
120
In the nicest way possible Svyr, not one word in your response to burn in and how you felt actually applies.  The majority of what you reported is as you said, purely psychological and you dismiss the possibility of burn in because you failed to look into this.  This is what i call " following the leader".  The super users around the audio world may say it doesn't exist, therefore you do just because.  I haven't the slightest idea what the heck decibel ratings and their possible change after burn in actually has to do with sound stage qualities noticeably changing, a small boost or in the WS70s case a reduction, stage depth, shape, and a vast array of bass qualities.  None of which will show up if you were only looking for frequency response or some type of weird notion that the overall loudness will change.  
 
I do actually read reviews of burn in here on head fi and many other places and I have only come across a few people mentioning a change in decibel ratings.  As if the human ear were able to pick up on such a thing...thats pure nonsense to me and it is the backing for nearly everyones dismissal of burn in existing.  the vast majority of people reporting burn in usually say staging qualities change, some bass feels different and noticeably less boomy, thick, or thin.  Yet most of those who say burn in doesnt exist feel as i said...they hooked their burnt in headphones to a frequency response meter or look for decibel changes and that literally is the same as saying "man...my tires on my car seem like they are wearing down, someone go take a look for me please"
 
....to which someone comes in and pops the hood of the car and says "no man, your engine looks fine" and walks out without even looking at the mangled tires.  Well...derppp
 
 
As for not trusting your gut, I assumed that anyone reading that would understand that researching would be a prerequisite to buying.  As I said ask questions about 5 times in my post.  Do your research, TRUST YOUR GUT and what YOU WANT.  If I had listened to myself over the past 15 years of being an audio nerd I'd have saved myself an awful lot of trouble.  The Bottom line is know what you want and trust yourself in what you might enjoy more than what someone recommends to you blindly and without really knowing your tastes.  New buyers rarely know what they truly want
 
"Super pwning Cables" are all rip offs in my opinion and I grow tired of being lied to so often.  My Fiio interconnect sounded identical to "they who must not be named" interconnect that costs an arm and a leg.   
 
The headbands are a product of lazy design and manufacturers who not only do not use their own gear, but could care less about you having to pay $800-2000 for your uncomfortable headphones.  Thank the audio gods for hifiman in the HE series.  Love them to death for being so well designed.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     Share This Post       
post-7644265
Post #15 of 65

Cheeznuklz

Head-Fier
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Messages
79
Reaction score
15
Joined
Jun 2, 2011
Posts
79
Likes
15
Very nice write up.  I especially like the "get what you want to get" line of advice.  I've been eying some sort of introductory stax setup, but the lack of lambda threads and gobs of HD650/K701 threads here on headfi made me nervous.  Screw that noise, my next buy's going to be Stax.
 
     Share This Post       

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top