Stax Lambda SR connector pin configuration?
Mar 19, 2013 at 2:18 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 8

evalon

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Hi all,
 
I've been so fortunate to be able to borrow a couple of Stax Lambda SRs which I'll shortly be listening to with my new headphone amp. However, I don't know the pin configuration of the connector - any of you can help with this?
 
Greetings from Denmark,
 
Jesper
 
Hi again,
 
Just found this thread:
 
http://www.head-fi.org/t/589430/high-quality-stax-headphone-adapter
 
here on head-fi so I no longer need information about the connector pinout. However, it seems that this model of the Stax lambda has a high bias voltage (on the headband the model is called SR & then a lambda symbol) - about 560 VDC. Might one of you confirm this - I'd rather not bias it too high
eek.gif

 
Best regards,
 
Jesper
 
Mar 19, 2013 at 7:45 PM Post #2 of 8

John Buchanan

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Quote:
Hi all,
 
I've been so fortunate to be able to borrow a couple of Stax Lambda SRs which I'll shortly be listening to with my new headphone amp. However, I don't know the pin configuration of the connector - any of you can help with this?
 
Greetings from Denmark,
 
Jesper
 
Hi again,
 
Just found this thread:
 
http://www.head-fi.org/t/589430/high-quality-stax-headphone-adapter
 
here on head-fi so I no longer need information about the connector pinout. However, it seems that this model of the Stax lambda has a high bias voltage (on the headband the model is called SR & then a lambda symbol) - about 560 VDC. Might one of you confirm this - I'd rather not bias it too high
eek.gif

 
Best regards,
 
Jesper

Check how many pins the plug has. 6 pins 230V; 5 pins 580V
 
Mar 20, 2013 at 2:25 AM Post #4 of 8

evalon

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Hi both,
 
& thanks for replying ... The plug is a 5 pin type so from what you write I need to make 580 VDC for this version.
 
Thanks again for replying 
wink.gif

 
Jesper
 
Mar 20, 2013 at 3:36 PM Post #5 of 8

NamelessPFG

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Just to be extra sure, Lambda-series earcups have nameplates on the top, usually obscured by the headband/arc assembly.
 
Normal bias ones are blank. Lambda Pros have "PROFESSIONAL" printed on the plates. Lambda Signatures have "Signature" written across them, so on and so forth for all the other Lambda models.
 
That's how I'm sure my particular Lambda is supposed to be a Normal bias set, even though it was rebuilt with a 5-pin Pro bias cable before I got it. (I'm guessing 6-pin Normal bias cables weren't on hand for whoever built it.)
 
Mar 21, 2013 at 11:31 AM Post #6 of 8

evalon

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Hi NamelessPFG,
 
Thank you also for clarifying. It says "Signature" on top of the earcups and no signs of rebuilds - so altogether it looks like a Pro bias version ... 
 
So off to listening (soon) :wink:
 
Jesper
 
Mar 22, 2013 at 3:25 PM Post #7 of 8

evalon

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Hi again,
 
Just tried out the headphone this evening, yet it is conspicuously quiet. Just a very low sound in the right channel ... 
frown.gif
 ... It might of course be defective but otherwise I wonder if I've interpreted this connector drawing correctly:
 
322x265px-LL-f587b718_stax-pro-bias-connector-schematic.png

 
I would say that this is the connector ON the headphone wire and I'm looking at the pins going OUT from the connector. Is that correct? In other words: I'm right now looking at the headphone connector's pins which are pointing towards my eyes...
 
I'd appreciate if one of you can confirm this as I'd rather not experiment too much ...
 
Greetings,
 
Jesper
 
May 16, 2016 at 6:23 AM Post #8 of 8

scott16

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For $8 I just made my own plug using 11 guage solid copper wire cut into 1.5" pins  (I used tin snips to cut the pins
 but this bent the pins so I had to straighten them with 2 pliers so if I ever do it again I'd use a hack saw to cut them instead).
And I used 2 part epoxy to make the plug.
 
 
The most important thing is to be sure to put the pins in the right holes in the socket before you drip the epoxy on the back of the pins
and make sure you don't get any epoxy on the socket or the amplifier, and also mix the epoxy for a few minutes b.c otherwise it wont harden (which I found out the hard way and it was quite messy having to remove the epoxy and start over again).
 
I also used shrink tubing over where I soldered the pins to the wires
and black electrical tape which I wrapped around the plug after the epoxy had hardened.
 
Anyway it works and looks really good and saved me $15 too.
I guess if I wasn't cheap I'd just spend the extra $15 and just buy the plug (that's the easiest way to do it). :)
 

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