STANTON, BEHRINGER, AUDIO-TECHNICA, TECHNICS
Mar 1, 2006 at 2:41 AM Post #2 of 11

nsjong

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Audio Technica are rather popular here.
I heard that the T44 are worth the cheap price on the net.

The rest of the headphones (technics, Stanton, etc) have poor frequency range. 20 - 20000.
frown.gif
 
Mar 1, 2006 at 2:51 AM Post #3 of 11

NotJeffBuckley

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Behringer's headphones are pieces of ****. The only worthwhile product I've ever used from them are the B2031A active studio monitors, which are only worthwhile because they're a very successful reverse-engineer of Genelec's higher end model. Their non-signal path products can be pretty cool (midi controller, I'm looking at you), and their mixers are fine for the price (though you're better in the long run saving your cash and getting, say, a Mackie), but their headphones are god-awful.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 2:25 AM Post #4 of 11

Drag0n

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Quote:

Originally Posted by nsjong
Audio Technica are rather popular here.
I heard that the T44 are worth the cheap price on the net.

The rest of the headphones (technics, Stanton, etc) have poor frequency range. 20 - 20000.
frown.gif



20-20,000hz is the range limit of human hearing. That frequency range is excellent.

Oh,and if youre looking at Pro headphones....Music123 has the Fostex T50RP on sale for $79 right now. The have a removeable headphone cord via one plug on one side of the headphone. I have the older T20RP and i love them. Theyre semi-open cans.
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Mar 2, 2006 at 2:32 AM Post #5 of 11

)v(ajin_R_

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Drag0n
20-20,000hz is the range limit of human hearing. That frequency range is excellent.


possibly.. but don't certain frequencies and sounds which are beyond our hearing limit also contribute to the feeling/atmosphere of music, perhaps certain vibrations and high pitched sounds?

just curious about that point where 20-20k range is excellent... i'd just like someone to clarify
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Mar 2, 2006 at 2:35 AM Post #6 of 11

Mercuttio

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Quote:

Originally Posted by nsjong
Audio Technica are rather popular here.
I heard that the T44 are worth the cheap price on the net.

The rest of the headphones (technics, Stanton, etc) have poor frequency range. 20 - 20000.
frown.gif



The T44 is cheap for a reason... it sounds awful.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 6:29 AM Post #7 of 11

NotJeffBuckley

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Quote:

Originally Posted by )v(ajin_R_
possibly.. but don't certain frequencies and sounds which are beyond our hearing limit also contribute to the feeling/atmosphere of music, perhaps certain vibrations and high pitched sounds?

just curious about that point where 20-20k range is excellent... i'd just like someone to clarify
tongue.gif



First of all, unqualified (as in, no +/-dB) frequency response means nothing. Secondly, you can't tell much of how a headphone will sound, as a whole, strictly by frequency response. I made that mistake early on and was baffled when, coming from HD650, the SR-60 didn't make my ears bleed with screechy highs (which prompted me to seek out the SR-225 since I liked the alternative take on the sound!)

It can give you generalities for comparison; for example, as you'd expect from the response curves, the HD650 is significantly bassier than the AKG K501, but the difference in sonic presentation (including how full it sounds as a result of driver placement and ear/headphone system enclosure size, among other things) can't be gleaned from a frequency curve. There's nothing unscientific about that, just expresses a limitation of a microphone as opposed to an inner ear canal and facial tissue under dynamic, musical conditions.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 8:44 PM Post #8 of 11

stefancolson

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Behringer headphones are terrible. They sound bad (grainy, distorted, thin), they don't fit well, and the build quality is the pits. The only headphone that I've heard that has sounded worse is the Ultrasone Proline 2500 (and I wanted to like it so bad...).
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 6:14 AM Post #9 of 11

Drag0n

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Quote:

Originally Posted by )v(ajin_R_
possibly.. but don't certain frequencies and sounds which are beyond our hearing limit also contribute to the feeling/atmosphere of music, perhaps certain vibrations and high pitched sounds?

just curious about that point where 20-20k range is excellent... i'd just like someone to clarify
tongue.gif



I understand what youre saying about sounds above and below our conscious perception giving the sound a sort of ambience or live quality. Ive read about that before,but not everyone can hear that either...i cant. Also i was referring to the fact that he said 20-20,000hz was a POOR frequency range,when it really isnt. Most loudspeakers dont even produce that,abiet some do...but not MOST. Also alot of great headphones have that frequency range. Alot of people over 50 cant hear above 15,000hz,as well as people that blast music all the time. And lets not forget those BOSE headphones and speakers that dont come with frequency response specs. Id venture to say that 40-16,000hz +/- 3db , may be pretty close to what those cover,and many people enjoy them and even say theyre the best,(i dont).
You may desire more than 20-20,000hz.....but i wouldnt roll my eyes at it and call it "poor". :SR80 with modded 414 pads Smiley:
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 7:31 AM Post #10 of 11

azncookiecutter

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No offence, but frequency doesn't mean jack when comparing/reviewing headphones. A good frequency range doesn't mean that the headphones would sound good.

BTW: If the OP was looking for DJ-style cans, look at the Sony V6s. Probably the only DJ-style cans that sound pretty good for its price.
 
Mar 5, 2006 at 8:04 AM Post #11 of 11

megawzrd

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I actually really loved my stanton dj pro 60s. I got this in the turtable setup (titanium pak) I purchased. The bass is awesome (both impact and depth). I think they are very "fun" cans but they look pretty ugly. For DJing purposes the bass impact is important for beat matching, mixing and blending...I have been interested in picking up some beyer 770s becuase of this. But my stantons are perfectly fine for now.
 

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