Sonic description of different Headphile woods?
May 17, 2007 at 6:13 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 13

BANGPOD

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Can any person post the link to the page on the Headphile website that describes the sonic qualities of the woods that are used?

I cannot find it and it is frustrating me.
 
May 17, 2007 at 6:21 PM Post #3 of 13

BANGPOD

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Haha, that sounds like a sexual innuendo -- are you being serious?
 
May 17, 2007 at 6:26 PM Post #4 of 13

silverrain

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The site wording has been modified within the last few months.

But, about 3-4 months ago, the ONLY "sonic" comment I could find (I looked many times) was that Larry was of the opinion that for Darth Beyers, the Cocobolo wood had a slight edge in sound, and that others may prefer something else -- and, also, that the sonic differences in the woods was *slight*, and that it is more important to select wood that you like the looks of, as being more important than the slight sonic differences.

Now, that wording has been replaced with info about the latest OPEN Darth Beyers, and the Luke SkyBeyers.
 
May 17, 2007 at 6:27 PM Post #5 of 13

nickknutson

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Quote:

Originally Posted by BANGPOD /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Haha, that sounds like a sexual innuendo -- are you being serious?


I was just being a smart-alec. I've never seen what you're looking for...I don't think that the wood makes a whole lot of difference. The cable choice has more impact than the wood selection.
 
May 17, 2007 at 6:34 PM Post #6 of 13

swt61

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The sound characteristics of most woods for this application will have very subtle differences, really too minute to bother with. They're are some woods that have a very distinct tonal quality like Red Spruce, but even then in this application I doubt the sonic differences would be all that great.
 
May 17, 2007 at 6:54 PM Post #7 of 13

Duggeh

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The housing material will make a big difference depending on the base material (plastic, wood, metal) but the differences within each type will be orders of magnitude smaller.
 
May 17, 2007 at 7:54 PM Post #8 of 13

terance

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i think it can be described as "placebo"
wink.gif


in all seriousness, i have not heard any headphile headphones
 
May 17, 2007 at 8:00 PM Post #9 of 13

swt61

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Quote:

Originally Posted by terance /img/forum/go_quote.gif
i think it can be described as "placebo"
wink.gif


in all seriousness, i have not heard any headphile headphones



Not really in that Larry doesn't claim that the wood has a lot to do with the sound characteristics of his modded phones, so placebo doesn't really fit the situation. The wood is an aesthetic mod and a medium he enjoys working in.
 
May 17, 2007 at 8:06 PM Post #10 of 13

terance

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Quote:

Originally Posted by swt61 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Not really in that Larry doesn't claim that the wood has a lot to do with the sound characteristics of his modded phones, so placebo doesn't really fit the situation. The wood is an aesthetic mod and a medium he enjoys working in.


that is kind of what i was implying

i am thinking about woddifying my 325i's, but i am worried that it gets it's bright sound from the aluminum housing.

i could very well be wrong
 
May 17, 2007 at 8:20 PM Post #11 of 13

silverrain

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I wonder how a famed Stradivarius (sp?) violin would sound, made out of simple pine, or some type of (gasp!) metal?
blink.gif
rolleyes.gif
eek.gif


Yeah -- I don't want my SR325 woodied either, for fear of losing those juicy highs. Other cans, yes, but not my 325's!
 
May 17, 2007 at 8:57 PM Post #12 of 13

milkpowder

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Quote:

Originally Posted by silverrain /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I wonder how a famed Stradivarius (sp?) violin would sound, made out of simple pine, or some type of (gasp!) metal?
blink.gif
rolleyes.gif
eek.gif


Yeah -- I don't want my SR325 woodied either, for fear of losing those juicy highs. Other cans, yes, but not my 325's!



The choice of wood and varnish is more important in violins and other acoustic string instruments because it is actively involved in the "amplification" of the sound through the sound post and bridge. The wood making up the sound box actually needs to resonate so the mechanical characteristics of the wood matters a lot! Different woods have different mechanical characteristics based on their age, humidity, part of the tree, tree ring width, type of wood, varnish applied to the wood, thickness of varnish applied to wood, dryness of the varnish, age of the varnish, thickness of wood, shape of wood, etc... Stradivari has managed to bring together perfect craftsmanship with perfect wood and varnish, something no one has managed to do despite the technology and money invested into discovering the secret behind his violins.

In headphones, the housing is merely a medium in which the way sound propagates behind the diaphragm is controlled. (Good housings are non-resonant, which is completely the opposite of the function of wood in a violin) This will in turn affect the way in which sound is produced between the diaphragm and the ear because reflection of sound waves back towards the diaphragm from the other side of the diaphragm will limit the kinetic energy applied on air by the diaphragm on the opposing side. If you have open headphones, try placing your hand over the rear port. You will notice a significant change in the sound. This is also the basis behind good speaker cabinet design - minimising the reflection of rear-firing energy by using damping material and unique internal shapes. For example, take a look at the B&W diamond tweeter and Kevlar midrange housing on the 800 series. Hence, I think the shape and size of headphone housings have a much greater effect on the sound than the material.

Anyway, this is what I think based on what I've seen and read in the past years as an "audio enthusiast" and amateur violinist. Please correct me if I've made an error.
 
May 17, 2007 at 9:07 PM Post #13 of 13

silverrain

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Quote:

Originally Posted by milkpowder /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hence, I think the shape and size of headphone housings have a much greater effect on the sound than the material.


And bass-ports, too.

Hence the popularity of the few screened deep-bowl Darth Beyers that are around here. Maybe I might jump on one of those boys frist next time one shows up.

quote: "take a look at the B&W diamond tweeter and Kevlar midrange housing"

Some of the amps in my band (including one of mine) used metal horns in combo with conventional speakers and various ports, for more "projection" of lead notes all the way to those far back rows. They worked, too -- boy did they work! Thank God for earplugs!

And, of course, our custom-made kevlar-cone piezo tweeter boxes for voice presence and projection. We were leading-edge sound-wise back then.
 

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