Schubert
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Shosta

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Another one: Box with the symphonies by Istvan Kertesz/Wiener Philharmoniker/LONDON-DECCA
Recordings 1964,1970 and 1972. Sound good (not very good). And smooth performances.
 
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Bill Ward

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Shosta
Another one: Box with the symphonies by Istvan Kertesz/Wiener Philharmoniker/LONDON-DECCA
Recordings 1964,1970 and 1972. Sound good (not very good). And smooth performances.



If you want a boxed set of of the Schubert symphonies, I like Sawallisch on Philips. I think they're available on the budget doubles label.

For the Octet check out another Philips disc (419 467-2). Iona Brown and the Academy Chamber Ensemble. Piano Trios - have the old Beaux Arts Trio with Lupu on Philips and the Ashkenazy/Zukerman/Harrell set on London.

BW
 
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Bunnyears

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Bill,

I have Sawallisch conducting some of the Schubert masses, and I have to say that he has a very good understanding of the composer. Now if the sound quality is there, that sounds like a good bet.
 
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Bill Ward

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Sound quality on my set is excellent. The original recordings date from 1967, but the CD transfers are clean, hiss-free and have the typical Philips sonic balance. I also have the Sawallisch Schumann set, which has comparable sound.

The Mackerras recordings interest me. Thanks for the mention. I have the 9th he did for Virgin Classics with the Orchestra of the Enlightenment, which I like. Mackerras has a transparency in orchestral works that I find intriguing, as if I'm hearing into the textures of the music. Does that make any sense?


Regards,

BW
 
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Bunnyears

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Actually, it does make sense. Harnoncourt at his best is also very adept at illuminating the inner voices of an orchestration. With his work, it's always a crapshoot. Sometimes the work comes across as incredibly stiff and lifeless, but when he succeeds you can hear things that you wouldn't have dreamed existed, as in his latest Mozart Requiem. Someone I know has his late Mozart symphonies which aren't in print anymore. While the interpretations aren't completely successful, they are fascinating to listen to.

Boulez also knows how to bring out every nuance in a score. Unfortunately, for me he is just so analytical that it really kills it.
 
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daycart1

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill Ward
Another Schuber enthusiast here, particularly the chamber works.
My favorite performance of the Quintet in C is an ancient recording by the Weller Quartet on London.
BW



Ditto the Quintet...after the Brahms clarinet quintet, this must be the greatest work in the entire chamber literature (well, IMO). I like the Weller vinyl, but my favorites are the old Heifetz/Piatigorsky et al on RCA shaded dog and a very old Casals/Vegh et al pickup recording.
For the late quartets, I think I like the old Budapest recordings.
For Winterreise, it is Fischer-Dieskau as usual (esp. the older Gerald Moore version).
 
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Bunnyears

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Ditto for Fisher-Dieskau/Moore! but I have been very impressed with the Bostridge/Andsnes pairing. It's a different sound as Bostridge is a tenor with an incredible range, from the baritone into the contra-tenor as compared to the bass-baritone of Fisher-Dieskau. I've also heard Barbara Bonney doing some of the lieder and that works incredibly well too.
 
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Bunnyears

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Just picked up Auryn Quartett's quintet in C (used and not the SACD or DVD-a being pushed by TACET). So far it sounds excellent. After I've listened more and compared it to the other recordings I have I'll post more if necessary.
 
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Bunnyears

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mark from HFR
Oh, those Schubert lieder! "An die Musik" is very possibly the only piece of music that can bring tears to my eyes no matter what mood I'm in, guaranteed.


DG has a new edition of Dietrich Fisher-Dieskau that includes the Schubert along with other offerings. Some of it is in mono, and it's US release date was May 15. Has anyone heard anything about this?

 
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seacard

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It's Schubert's birthday today, and I've been inspired to listen to his music all day. Really, tremendous stuff. The Symphonies, especially 8 and 9, are second to none. The string quartets, piano trios, impromptus, piano sonatas are all top notch and near the top of the genre. I'm surprised that we have so few discussions about Schubert's music as compared to Beethoven, Mahler, and Mozart. I think Schubert definitely belongs in the same conversation as those greats.
 
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JayG

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I think part of the reason that Schubert's work isn't as popular as many of the other great composers is that his main body of work isn't in the more widely listened-to genres (Symphonies, Operas, Concertos, for example). Yes the 8th and 9th symphonies are masterpieces, and some of his earlier symphonies certainly deserve more attention than they get, but after that you have to move to chamber music to find his best music and the majority of his output, which many people aren't willing to do. It's a shame, though, because as you say, his piano sonatas, string quartets, piano quintet, and especially his huge catalogue of lieder, are as good as they come.

-Jay
 
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Bunnyears

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The thing that I like best about Schubert is that he was so sociable. Beethoven's string quartets are incredibly deep but no one feels compelled to play them when they are socializing. Schubert on the other hand is extroverted music for the most part. It's music to play when you are with friends, even the saddest D960 is a friendly sadness. Schubert never pushes you away, it just embraces the listener like a good friend.
 
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BAwig05

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I think the Schubert symphonies are excellent, and I especially like No.5 of all things, because of its lightness and classical poise

Dietrich Fisher-Dieskau was a great Schubert artist. I prefer his Schubert collaborations on DG with Jorg Demus, but Moore is unchallanged in may was as well.

For his fans, there is a six disc set of Brahms Lieder with Moore, Richter, and others on Brilliant.
 
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Sarchi

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bill Ward /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Another Schubert enthusiast here, particularly the chamber works.


+1
I have trouble reconciling that a composer can make such excellent chamber music, yet his orchestral works are strangely inaccessible to me. I can listen to "heavy" orchestral stuff (Mahler, Beethoven), but Schubert just sounds disjointed and confusing.

All the trios, sonatas, the quintets, and some of the quartets are amazing. One of my favorites: Decca SXL6426, the sonata for piano and cello with Britten and Rostropovich.
 
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Bunnyears

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Sarchi,

Try the Immerseel set or if you can find the, the Bruno Weill recordings with Tafelmusik. HIP Schubert symphonies really hang together so much better than big band.
 
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