Samsung HDTV "click of death" DIY repair
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MikeyFresh

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Anyone with certain model Samsung HDTVs manufactured before Dec. 31, 2008 might be interested in a DIY repair for a known problem with faulty capacitors in the power supply.
 
Samsung reached a settlement in a class action lawsuit that provided for free repair of this specific problem until Nov. 2013. The models involved:
 

Eventually these HDTVs will not power on, the turn-on relay just clicks away (click, click, click, click... hence click of death) due to failed electrolytic capacitors on the power supply board.
 
My company has 5 of the 46" LCD models affected by this problem situated in various office, conference, and break rooms in our HQ location.
 
Three of them failed within the last month, about 6 months too late for a free repair although I don't think Samsung would have covered us anyway due to the TVs not being used in a consumer setting, and they were inherited from a previous tenant of the building, we weren't the original purchasers and have no receipts.
 
I decided to take them apart and attempt a repair, as the replacement capacitors are quite cheap, so it's worth a try for $10 in parts (shipped).
 
Disclaimer: do not attempt any similar repairs unless you are experienced in basic electrical troubleshooting and repair, and have a full understanding of the proper safety measures and precautions that need to be followed.
 

 
Samsung 46" HDTV power supply, the specific part # for this board is BN44-00203A. It was used in the Samsung 46" 540, 650, and 750 Series, as well as the Sony LN46A630M1FXZA according to some sources.
 

 
Two capacitors with bulging tops are leaking electrolytic fluid.
 

 
Underside of board where the failed caps attach.
 

 
Faulty capacitors removed from circuit board.
 

 
Underside of board with caps removed.
 

 
Aggressive use of solder wick caused slight damage to through-holes.
 

 
Removal implements with the failed caps.
 

 
Destined to fail, 10 volt caps in a 13 volt power supply. Intentionally bad engineering?
 

 
16 volt replacement caps.
 

 
Hakko 50 watt soldering iron.
 

 
WBT-0800 low temperature melting point solder.
 

 
New solder joints, fairly clean job.
 

 
New capacitors installed, this board is repaired.
 

 
Repaired board installed in TV.
 

 
Reconnect all wiring harnesses.
 

 
Replace the internal metal chassis cover.
 

 
Replace the outer plastic chassis cover.
 

 
Replace on wall mount, reconnect to digital cable set-top box, power on...3,2,1, lift-off in the company break room.
 
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MikeyFresh

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Set # 2 of 3 repaired, office area.
 
This one had 4 blown power supply capacitors, the same two undervalued 10 volt caps as in the first repair, and also the two 25 volt caps directly adjacent on the circuit board. All 4 are situated just a bit too close to a heat sink, no doubt shortening their life span.
 

 
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MikeyFresh

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Failed Samsung HDTV power supply # 3 of 3, conference room.
 
The 2 undervalued 10 volt caps are bad/leaking some electrolytic fluid, probably a good idea to replace the entire row of 4 nearest the heat sink.
 

 
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AladdinSane

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I had my Sammy done under warranty but I'm keeping your name in the archives!
 
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MikeyFresh

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  I had my Sammy done under warranty but I'm keeping your name in the archives!
I'm glad to hear you were able to get it done under warranty.
 
Out of curiosity, is your set one of the models they covered through Nov. 2013 in that class action suit settlement, or was it just a straight repair of a different model under it's regular 1 year warranty period?
 
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AladdinSane

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It was one of the models covered in the original class action suit. It is a 52" 650 series. Still going strong (crosses fingers).
 
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MikeyFresh

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I repaired failed power supply board #3 of 3 this morning, replacing all 4 caps nearest the heat sink.
 

 
Underside of board with failed caps removed, I worked left to right and you can see my haste to finish the removal, a fair amount of solder wick damage to the through holes occurred on the one farthest right.
 

 
Top side of board with all 4 caps removed.
 

 

 
I forgot to mention the 2 fuses on this board in the previous repairs, one a 3.15 amp and the other a 6.3 amp value (both 250 volt). In all three repairs neither of these 2 fuses were blown, this power supply fails without tripping the fuses, in all 3 of these sets the fuses still test as good. Probably not a bad idea to replace them anyway, but I didn't.
 

 
Threading the leads for one of the 25 volt replacement capacitors. Pay attention to the correct polarity, these aren't bipolar type caps and will instantly fail on power up if they are installed backwards.
 

 
All 4 replacements threaded through, now ready for soldering.
 

 
Leads soldered in place.
 

 
Trimmed the excess lead length, this board is repaired and ready for re-installation tomorrow.
 
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AladdinSane

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Warning: you might be a geek. 
 I hope your employers are grateful for you saving them a few new screens. 
 
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MikeyFresh

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Warning: you might be a geek. :D  I hope your employers are grateful for you saving them a few new screens. 
I'll take that as a compliment.

Actually I'm just old school, there once was a time when a broken TV set was almost always repaired. Nowadays almost all broken electronics are swiftly dumped into the trash, and end up in a landfill, which is really disappointing in terms of the environment. But that's what people do because of cheap Asian manufacturing, it's too easy and somewhat inexpensive to just buy a new TV.

I hope this thread inspires someone to fix their TV instead of tossing it in the trash, that's the entire reason I've posted this.

That said, my company is very appreciative and this was definitely worth doing considering the parts are cheap and we didn't pay anything for these HDTVs, they came with the lease for our new HQ space left behind by the previous tenant, so we don't have any investment in them. It was worth a try.

My co-workers are especially appreciative, they can put an occasional eye on the FIFA World Cup games, breakfast at Wimbledon etc...

And I enjoy a challenge.
 
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Most definitely  a compliment from a fellow geek. Apologies if you thought otherwise. I never had the chance to solder so that always intrigues me. I did just talk my father-in-law out of a soldering iron so maybe I'll see what damage I can do on something noncritical. However, that would not be my Sammy! Maybe some headphone cables or the cat (joking!).
 
USA!
 
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MikeyFresh

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  Most definitely  a compliment from a fellow geek. Apologies if you thought otherwise. I never had the chance to solder so that always intrigues me. I did just talk my father-in-law out of a soldering iron so maybe I'll see what damage I can do on something noncritical. However, that would not be my Sammy! Maybe some headphone cables or the cat (joking!).
 
USA!

No offense taken, I hope your repaired Sammy lasts a long time, maybe in the meantime you can start soldering on some cables or something.
 
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Re-installed the repaired power supply board in set #3 of 3, power on.
 

 
I'll let the IT guys replace it on the wall mount in the conference room, my work is done, it's a little too heavy for me to lift and place by myself.
 
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Hello, I am having the same situation with Samsung UA46D7000. My warranty is expired, but anyway, I call samsung to take a look which charged me HKD 500. The guy just open the case and take a look without any testing and say, the click sound is due to the problem of the main screen and tell me nothing wrong with the power supply board.
 
He insist that if the power supply board have problem, the screen will be on but with some kind of wrong color and it must be the main screen that generate the click sound. So he ask me to replace the main screen, which is HKD 8930 (at the time 2016 May). And it is more expensive than buying a new one.
 
Sure I won't replace the main screen, because the samsung guy is obviously cheating me and I am going to complain to consumer council. However, I saw those cap on the power supply board have no leaking and no swell up. What do you think about it? 
 
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MikeyFresh

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  Hello, I am having the same situation with Samsung UA46D7000. My warranty is expired, but anyway, I call samsung to take a look which charged me HKD 500. The guy just open the case and take a look without any testing and say, the click sound is due to the problem of the main screen and tell me nothing wrong with the power supply board.
 
He insist that if the power supply board have problem, the screen will be on but with some kind of wrong color and it must be the main screen that generate the click sound. So he ask me to replace the main screen, which is HKD 8930 (at the time 2016 May). And it is more expensive than buying a new one.
 
Sure I won't replace the main screen, because the samsung guy is obviously cheating me and I am going to complain to consumer council. However, I saw those cap on the power supply board have no leaking and no swell up. What do you think about it? 

You are correct in thinking the repair guy is likely wrong, various issues with a power supply board will cause the unit to refuse power-up, in this case the relay clicks but there is insufficient stored capacitance to actually power up the unit.
 
Sometimes the caps have failed but don't really show any physical signs of failure, they won't always leak although they do usually swell up.
 
In some cases they fail due to drying up, the electrolytic fluid vanishes over time especially if the set is installed in an area of high ambient temperature/low air circulation.
 
It is easy enough to remove the power supply board in the manner I described earlier in this thread, and then test the caps with a simple volt/multi meter.
 
You aren't actually testing for the capacitance value, you set the multimeter for continuity and put one lead on the positive leg, and the other lead on the negative leg of any given cap.
 
There should be NO continuity between the two legs, if there is continuity (indicated by a beep sound on most continuity testers) that cap has shorted out/failed, and needs to be replaced.
 
This test is easy to do yourself, even if you don't have a multimeter, you can probably borrow one from an acquaintance, or buy one inexpensively. The volt meter I used is a Velleman DVM 850 that cost me all of about $12 a few years ago, you don't need a fancy high-end Fluke or other professional use brand name for this application, certainly you can find a similar unit for no more than $15 or so.
 
The most time consuming aspect is taking out the power supply board, tedious but just take your time and be methodical in order not to strip any of the screws. From there you look at the bottom side of the board to find the test points for each cap, that part is easy and fast.
 
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