Remember when you where Young and Music just washed over you and touched your inner soul?
May 7, 2009 at 12:01 AM Post #16 of 34

bergman2

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"young" ????
it's not a number, it's a state of mind
 
May 7, 2009 at 1:35 AM Post #17 of 34

crossmd

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Alot of this issue, has been for me..not the loss of the impact of music, but my adaptation to that music.

Doesn't the presence of something make it more easily taken for granted?

Here's what I mean: Those songs that I've listened to, literally, thousands of times have sort of (understandably) lost their luster. I know what to expect, I know whats coming next. Where the creshendo is going to fall. And maybe, there's a little less attention going into those musical forms that I can completely comprehend already.

Enter Hi-fi audio.

The music I thought I knew so well was made more clear, and for a while, I saw it again with new eyes. Until even that becomes the new standard.

And I realize that "music" as an entity in and of itself doesn't ever lose its impact, but rather..my perspective on it has lessened that impact for ME. And while I recognize that exceptions exist, (even for me) expecting your psychology to respond the same way EVERY time to the same music is almost sort of ludicrous, especially after a good period of time.

And so. I think I'm perpetually searching for that next fix, usually in exposing myself to different forms, genres, derivations of known genres, etc. If we experience the same emotional resonance to a song everytime, I think we would lose the sense of the chase. (I know I would..) For me, (in the most unpretentious way possible..) I recently found Puccini's Turandot, and found myself floored that something so beautiful could have escaped me for so long. But were it not for my desire to find that "intensity" [as stated by cswann] all over again, in a different form maybe, I wouldn't have maybe ever found it. And I would argue that I would definitely argue that that would be a tragedy (ignorance=bliss aside).

Oh. and I'm nineteen. -- Does that mean that I should I be worried then about what I'm "wearing out" now?

Hoping this made sense!

.mc
 
May 7, 2009 at 2:46 AM Post #18 of 34

kool bubba ice

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Quote:

Originally Posted by theBigD /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hey, I was just thinking about how when I was young and music just affected by being so very much. And I realized that through the middle part of my life I kinda lost touch with that. And recently with my new Denon D7000 and a new Stello DAC and the C2C amp, I am experiencing music like this again! Its absolutely Incredible! Ive also been listening to some pretty incredible music like Patricia Barbers "The Premonition Years" and Holly Coles new album as welll as Metallica's black albumn, really ive been investing in higher quality music becuase I can really hear the difference with my new source and amp.

So how is this for you guys? what new gear or music has done this for you?

And isnt it great to feel YOUNG again?
smily_headphones1.gif



Remember. It's all about the music and not the gear...Sighhhhhhh. Something tells me, w ithout the great gear you have, this thread would have never came up..) Meant as a compliant. Enjoy. Better gear does enhance your listening experience.


My balanced 650, and DAC1/Bada 12 701 combo took me to the place your at..Pure Utopia.. But know days I'm switching to more neutral headphones, and studio reference monitors, strictly made for professional use. It's a whole new listening experience, and offers a different wow type experience. I'm looking at the studio grade CD900ST next.
 
May 7, 2009 at 2:57 AM Post #19 of 34

kool bubba ice

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Quote:

Originally Posted by crossmd /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Alot of this issue, has been for me..not the loss of the impact of music, but my adaptation to that music.

Doesn't the presence of something make it more easily taken for granted?

Here's what I mean: Those songs that I've listened to, literally, thousands of times have sort of (understandably) lost their luster. I know what to expect, I know whats coming next. Where the creshendo is going to fall. And maybe, there's a little less attention going into those musical forms that I can completely comprehend already.

Enter Hi-fi audio.

The music I thought I knew so well was made more clear, and for a while, I saw it again with new eyes. Until even that becomes the new standard.

And I realize that "music" as an entity in and of itself doesn't ever lose its impact, but rather..my perspective on it has lessened that impact for ME. And while I recognize that exceptions exist, (even for me) expecting your psychology to respond the same way EVERY time to the same music is almost sort of ludicrous, especially after a good period of time.

And so. I think I'm perpetually searching for that next fix, usually in exposing myself to different forms, genres, derivations of known genres, etc. If we experience the same emotional resonance to a song everytime, I think we would lose the sense of the chase. (I know I would..) For me, (in the most unpretentious way possible..) I recently found Puccini's Turandot, and found myself floored that something so beautiful could have escaped me for so long. But were it not for my desire to find that "intensity" [as stated by cswann] all over again, in a different form maybe, I wouldn't have maybe ever found it. And I would argue that I would definitely argue that that would be a tragedy (ignorance=bliss aside).

Oh. and I'm nineteen. -- Does that mean that I should I be worried then about what I'm "wearing out" now?

Hoping this made sense!

.mc



Impressive gear for 19. I'm glad some young people know how to appreciate music.
 
May 7, 2009 at 5:40 AM Post #20 of 34

MysteryMachine

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Love this thread! Here is my experience with music.

Teens: You are going through so many powerful emotions during this time and, for me at least, music would weld itself to these experiences and just become part of the experience. Still to this day hearing certain songs brings me back to those emotions and its powerful. Things like your first love, having your heart broken by said first love, learning to drive and getting away from your parents with the music blasting in the car etc. (but man was I listening to some trash for equipment LOL to think I thought my car stereo sounded good hah hah)

Twenties: Still caries over the stuff from the teens and even more. The big thing here was when I was 21 or so I met a friend who was 28 and was an audiophile. My whole world changed after that - the way the music could wash over you insted of just being sound coming out of 2 speakers. I relistened to all the music of my years before and was in heaven. Music became a big part of my life at this point. I also met the girl who would eventually be my wife and enjoyed opening her ears to all this new music (both new music and the world of high quality music). Still the downside was some music lost its "fun" if it was a poor/flat/overly loud recording. (this is getting worse with the loudness wars in CDs).

Thirties (where I am now): Music doesn't hold that emotional impact it once did. Or I should say it can, but not usually over and over - I can't buy an album and revell in it for months. I dunno if there just isn't anything good enough to blow my mind, like Joshua Tree at the time for example or when I discovered Pink Floyd, or if I just have a shorter attention span now. I have this beast now that I must keep feeding by buying new CDs and more than 9 times out of 10 I am dissatisfied with them. But that 1 out of 10 keeps me coming back for more. Also in my thirties I discovered that great music was made even before I was born. I thought before I was born it was Elvis and then the beatles and thats it (sorry I am not a big beatles nor elvis fan).


Looking back though I am not sure I'd want to go back. Sure certain distinct musical experiences I would love to replay but overall - probably not. Its easy to look back on those emotional times with a fondness or a longing - but there was a lot of pain, confusion etc that I think was there more frequently than happiness. One thing I do miss is just being able to sit in the dark for hours just enjoying the music. I find it hard to do that these days as I get either my wife or dog interupting me or more likely my head is just filled with too many things I "should" be doing around the house instead of just listening to music. Life has gotten too busy (of course here I sit typing this response for a half hour LOL so I guess in reality its not, its just different)

I hope all the "kids" of today have that same eye opening experience I had when I met my "audiophile friend" and decide to throw out their ipods (or at least use 320 or lossless and throw out the stock ear buds).

So whats next in the Forties?
 
May 7, 2009 at 5:51 AM Post #21 of 34

bergman2

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MysteryMachine /img/forum/go_quote.gif
So whats next in the Forties?


I'm just guessing but Norah Jones and Rogaine?
 
May 7, 2009 at 6:25 AM Post #22 of 34

Ham Sandwich

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It's the stages of developmental psychology that cause us to seek out and revel in new experiences like music when we are young. As you mature you lose that. You aren't going to get those feelings and experiences back with better gear unless that gear happens to include some sort of machine that causes reverse aging.
 
May 7, 2009 at 6:38 AM Post #23 of 34

theBigD

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Ham Sandwich /img/forum/go_quote.gif
It's the stages of developmental psychology that cause us to seek out and revel in new experiences like music when we are young. As you mature you lose that. You aren't going to get those feelings and experiences back with better gear unless that gear happens to include some sort of machine that causes reverse aging.


I completely dissagree with this. For one I will always continue to seek out new experiences often and I revel in the discovery of new music. Two getting better gear is the extension of my desire to seek out new experiences by revealing music in a more natural and real way.
 
May 7, 2009 at 6:53 AM Post #24 of 34

leveller1642

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Quote:

There has never been a better time to listen to music


I cannot remember who said this but it was a musician and think it was in Mojo magazine. i could not agree more with that statement. I certainly have never had it better myself and definitely don't believe that a "golden period" for music has finished. I'm nearly 52 years old. I find the stuff being released today just as exiting as anything i listened to in the seventies. I am touched emotionally everyday by what i listen to. I find it helps not to become to familiar with albums and to have a constant supply of new music.

However, i did recently meet up with an old acquaintance and listened to his vinyl recordings on the same turntable i used in the seventies- a Dual turntable with Shure M91ED cartridge that I bought S/H a few months ago- on his decent set-up. We listened old favourites like War and Ten Years After etc etc. I, was surprised,as was my friend, to find the magic of my youth was reproduced by the quality of the vinyl despite the crackles. I am a convert, but unfortunately vinyl is an impossibility for me due to my lifestyle. I do have 192 AAC rips of a couple of hard to get War albums and they sound great in their own way.
 
May 7, 2009 at 7:02 AM Post #25 of 34

Shike

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Growing up I didn't listen to music as much as played it. I played piano, violin, and tenor saxophone. I easily played each for 10+ years, but gave up when I broke the scaphoid bone in my left wrist. It took over a year to heal that damn thing, and thanks to the fracture being caught late because it wasn't complete it was treated like a sprain (wasn't a clean fracture). It may never function entirely the same. I may never get the full flexability or strength of my wrist back again. When I tried to play instruments again it frustrated me tremendously, and now I mearly play on occasion when my wrist is doing particularly well.

Now that I'm older I mostly seek music that reminds me of playing in a full orchestra, band, etc. Music that brings the full texture of violins and voices out or resonates a nice warm tone, and for what sake? Nostalgia. The tone and timbre change, but for some reason I still get the feeling of pulling my bow across the string, feeling the tone course through my hands, the sound of cymblas and drums clashing from behind me, or the sheer open sound of the piano as it filled the room with my fingers on cool to the touch ivory keys (we had a very old piano before ivory became a no-no).

When it's not for this purpose though the music is still mostly in accord with nostalgia and the emotions I feel. As an introvert it generally suits someone like me.

For this reason if I ever get "bored" with music it's usually not worth changing it but moving on entirely. When the magic dies it dies, and is left to be rediscovered in years when maybe the music itself will hold nostalgic value in comparison to its attributes.
 
May 7, 2009 at 11:44 AM Post #26 of 34

koshman

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I agree that when you get older and get into this hobby - improving your setup, trying new cans, amps etc., the focus slightly shifts from the music itself (contents) to the technical side (form). But I see it as an extra dimension that extends and enriches my enjoyment of music rather than something that replaces or lessens it. The downside is that you might not be able to enjoy music as much from a crappy source as you could before you got used to a decent setup
Plus there are music genres that, in my opinion, you can never truly appreciate without a certain level of quality of the reproduction. For example I could never get into prog, because it always sounded to me like a bloated overdone chaotic huge mass of sound, but when I got a decent setup and tried it again I found that the improved clarity, soundstage and instrument separation made me enjoy it greatly (though in many cases it really is often overdone
smily_headphones1.gif
).
 
May 7, 2009 at 11:51 AM Post #27 of 34

KONAKONA

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Guess 15 would count as young then?
biggrin.gif


I enjoy music quite a lot, and I did before I got into audiophile stuff too. Back then the only thing I worried about was how long I could keep the things in my ears (Cheap IEMs back then, koss sparkplugs being the most mentionable) and that the teachers didn't know I was listening.

I found when I got my first good headphones (portapros) that there was an entire side of music that I was missing. I got to go through and listen to all the songs I ever liked again, and enjoy them almost as much, if not moreso, as the first time I ever heard them. It seems that when you have better equipment, music is simply more enjoyable. I would think to the point that a song that you might not have liked before on bad equipment can become one you can enjoy.

Of course I bought the portapros before coming here, so no one told me there was no going back. I can't say my wallet likes it as much here as I do.
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May 7, 2009 at 6:11 PM Post #28 of 34

zaphod373

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Quote:

Originally Posted by theBigD /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hey, I was just thinking about how when I was young and music just affected by being so very much. And I realized that through the middle part of my life I kinda lost touch with that. And recently with my new Denon D7000 and a new Stello DAC and the C2C amp, I am experiencing music like this again! Its absolutely Incredible! Ive also been listening to some pretty incredible music like Patricia Barbers "The Premonition Years" and Holly Coles new album as welll as Metallica's black albumn, really ive been investing in higher quality music becuase I can really hear the difference with my new source and amp.

So how is this for you guys? what new gear or music has done this for you?

And isnt it great to feel YOUNG again?
smily_headphones1.gif



shine on you crazy diamond
smile.gif
 
May 7, 2009 at 7:01 PM Post #29 of 34

rhythmdevils

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if you need equipment for music to touch your soul, then you have problems. Sorry.

I'm not saying I'm totally free of attachment to my equipment. But we've got to have at least some knowledge that this is delusional, that the equipment is just fun, and not necessary, and that really, it is quite silly, and music is what really has the substance, the soul.
 
May 7, 2009 at 7:05 PM Post #30 of 34

JohnnyCakes

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i remember this happening last Friday.
 

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