Recommendations for Books on Sound Science
Dec 9, 2016 at 4:16 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 17

pila405

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Hi,

I wish to delve deeper into the field of sound science. I am a student in double major program in math and physics, currently in my third year, so I had basic courses on: Fourier analysis, probability, physics of waves, multivariable calculus, linear algebra, ordinary and partial differential equations and electromagnetism (this one was not so basic, actually. More like a graduate level course). 
On what books do you recommend? Where should one start? Signal processing? Acoustics? Basics of electrical engineering? 
On what specific books do you recommend?

Thanks! :)
 
Dec 9, 2016 at 6:30 PM Post #2 of 17

MindsMirror

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There is a broad range of topics that fall under sound science. Is there anything in particular that interests you? One of the most interesting topics for me was digital signal processing and Nyquist theorem.
 
Dec 9, 2016 at 7:10 PM Post #3 of 17

pila405

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This is indeed one of the topics I find most interesting. (DSP), but also acoustics and the relevant electrical engineering and circuits design required for actually being able to design the different components in the system. (specifically ADC\DAC and amplifier)

I have no prior knowledge in EE and that's why I ask for a direction - a guidance. 
 
Dec 10, 2016 at 8:27 AM Post #4 of 17

gregorio

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You might try Digital Audio Explained by Nika Aldrich. A good general explanation of the principles of digital audio and required reading for many sound/music technology degree courses.
The Audio Engineers Approach to understanding digital filters, also by Nika Aldrich. Although Nika describes it as a very elementary primer, it's really not so elementary, at least it wasn't for me! With your background it is probably rather simplistic but I'm sure you'll still find it a good introduction and, it's a free PDF.
The Master Handbook of Acoustics is also a recommendable read for that subject area.
 
G
 
Dec 10, 2016 at 2:18 PM Post #5 of 17

pila405

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Great! I'll check it out. Thanks!

I also looked for material on MIT OCW on found quite a bit about DSP and electronic circuits. 
Some of the books I saw recommended, and would like to know what you think about are:
Acoustics: Sound Propagation - Yang Hann Kim
Circuits: Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits - Agarwal and Lang
DSP: Discrete-Time Signal Processing; Alan V. Oppenheim
Signals and Systems - Alan V. Oppenheim
 
Dec 10, 2016 at 2:33 PM Post #6 of 17

pila405

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The book by Aldrich does seem pretty basic, but it looks like the perfect place to start from the table of content. Thank you very much!
 
Dec 11, 2016 at 3:37 AM Post #7 of 17

spruce music

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Much of the electronic gear has advanced to the point of being near perfection.  Not perfect, but near it.  With your background, if you have a goal, deciding how to approach it will not be a problem. 
 
So this might seem odd, but I would think you are at a good point to learn about what the parameters of hearing are.  That will give you something like wisdom about what technical aspects of gear design are worth pursuing.
 
So the following suggestions:
 
https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/spatial-hearing
 
Whatever the latest version of Jens Blauert's is available.
 
https://www.amazon.com/Sound-Reproduction-Psychoacoustics-Loudspeakers-Engineering/dp/0240520092
 
This is the Floyd O'toole work on loudspeakers and rooms.
 
https://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-Hearing-Introduction-William-Yost/dp/9004236384/ref=dp_ob_title_bk
 
A basic book on the fundamentals of hearing.  William Yost.
 
An alternative to the above is Brian C.J.  Moore's book. I preferred Yost a decade back, but I believe Moore's book has been kept more up to date in the latest edition.
 
https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Psychology-Hearing-Brian-Moore/dp/1780520387/ref=dp_ob_title_bk
 
Dec 11, 2016 at 11:39 AM Post #8 of 17

watchnerd

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Ethan Winer's "The Audio Expert" is very comprehensive.  650 pages:
 
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0240821009/ref=as_li_qf_sp_asin_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=ethanwicom-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0240821009
 
Dec 11, 2016 at 1:02 PM Post #9 of 17

pila405

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Yeah! I saw his AES presentation and found his book. Thanks!
 
Dec 12, 2016 at 1:20 PM Post #10 of 17

pfzar

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Loudspeaker and Headphone Handbook. 
 
https://www.amazon.com/Loudspeaker-Headphone-Handbook-John-Borwick/dp/0240515781/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481566802&sr=8-1&keywords=loudspeaker+and+headphone+handbook
 
Dec 13, 2016 at 4:25 AM Post #11 of 17

U-3C

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Are there any books you guys recommend for a total beginner? No knowledge of math or physics at the moment. Only layman's understanding of how sound works. ;-;

Just wanted to know where to start so I won't buy books that confuse me and make me give up. ^_^
 
Dec 13, 2016 at 9:59 AM Post #12 of 17

watchnerd

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Are there any books you guys recommend for a total beginner? No knowledge of math or physics at the moment. Only layman's understanding of how sound works. ;-;

Just wanted to know where to start so I won't buy books that confuse me and make me give up. ^_^

 
I'm not trying to be a jerk, but this is pretty hard to do without at least high school level physics and math.
 
Dec 13, 2016 at 2:11 PM Post #14 of 17

watchnerd

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And which will be the recommendations for a beginner, beyond the basic levels of physics and math?

 
Ethan Winer's books is 650 pages long and is one of the few that covers a little bit of everything -- acoustics, electronics, analog, digital, recording, production, etc.
 

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