Re-sting Guitar help!
Mar 22, 2010 at 12:06 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 14

unl3a5h3d

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I didn't know where to put this so here it is. I am new to playing the guitar. I am learning about chord progression and I am getting to where I can actually play a rift. But I need to re-string my acoustic. I have an Alvarez acoustic guitar, I don't know model or any of that, I can get a pic if needed though. I just need help with which strings to buy. I have heard/read that Elixr and Ernie Ball are the best strings but I don't know which to buy, as far as medium, light and all of that. I just need steering in the right direction. Thanks.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 12:30 AM Post #2 of 14

feh1325

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since you're new, get light strings. they'll be easier to play.

about the brand, its really up to preference. i've tried many brands, including ernie ball and elixr, and have finally settled on the strings i like. while ernie ball is my favorite electric guitar strings, i find their acoustic strings too expensive. likewise, the elixrs, though they feel very nice on my fingers, are expensive as well.
so now i use d'addario light prosphor bronze.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 12:38 AM Post #3 of 14

smrtby123

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I love, love, love the Elixer Nanowebs. I don't play as often as I used to, and so I can put these on and in about 6 months, seriously, they sound just as good. They stay clean and don't oxidize like most other ones do. I swear by them on all my guitars.

If you want to go with more traditional strings I always used to love Ernie Ball Earthwood strings on my acoustic, as well.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 12:46 AM Post #4 of 14

unl3a5h3d

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I am warning you this is going to be a really dumb question.

Does this have all of the stings, as in E, A... or is it just one specific string?
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 4:34 AM Post #8 of 14

nhancakes

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hm do you not have a guitar center or some kind of guitar shop near by to help you out? everyone is usually very helpful. I like DR.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 6:09 AM Post #9 of 14

Omega

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Buy cheap strings when you're learning, no reason to do otherwise (yet). Light strings are made from a smaller gauge of wire, which take less force to deflect onto the frets...so light strings will be easier to play than medium, etc. The thicker strings produce a fuller sound. As you build callouses and finger strength, it will be easier to play a heavier gauge, if you desire. I would actually recommend against the nanoweb strings. They are unnecessarily expensive (at least in my local shops), and the coatings give a soft sound and touch...slows down the building of callouses
evil_smiley.gif


I string my acoustic with medium strings. Martin phosphor bronze strings sound nice, but they can be rough on uncalloused fingers.

Before you string your guitar, get a guitar-playing friend to help you the first time. Or take it to a nearby shop, and ask someone to show you how to string the first one. Stringing a guitar is easy, but you don't want to damage the guitar or develop bad habits over time.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 5:09 PM Post #10 of 14

chadbang

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I let a saleswoman at a guitar store talk me into buying a plastic guitar string winder. They're not expensive. You sort of crank them to tighten strings. I've had if for about six years now. One of the best things I ever bought. What a time saver and frustration preventer.
 
Mar 22, 2010 at 9:13 PM Post #11 of 14

unl3a5h3d

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Omega /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Buy cheap strings when you're learning, no reason to do otherwise (yet). Light strings are made from a smaller gauge of wire, which take less force to deflect onto the frets...so light strings will be easier to play than medium, etc. The thicker strings produce a fuller sound. As you build callouses and finger strength, it will be easier to play a heavier gauge, if you desire. I would actually recommend against the nanoweb strings. They are unnecessarily expensive (at least in my local shops), and the coatings give a soft sound and touch...slows down the building of callouses
evil_smiley.gif


I string my acoustic with medium strings. Martin phosphor bronze strings sound nice, but they can be rough on uncalloused fingers.

Before you string your guitar, get a guitar-playing friend to help you the first time. Or take it to a nearby shop, and ask someone to show you how to string the first one. Stringing a guitar is easy, but you don't want to damage the guitar or develop bad habits over time.



My fingers aren't calloused yet. I hope they do soon, they limit my playing time to about an hour then 20 or 30 minutes off. But I have a friend who is going to help me. I have watched tutorials and from what I have seen the hardest part is getting the bridge pins out. Any tips?

Quote:

Originally Posted by chadbang /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I let a saleswoman at a guitar store talk me into buying a plastic guitar string winder. They're not expensive. You sort of crank them to tighten strings. I've had if for about six years now. One of the best things I ever bought. What a time saver and frustration preventer.


Yeah that is what my friend (above) said. And my guitar came with one, so I guess I am lucky
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.

But as far as buying strings, I think I am going with the Elixr Nanowebs. I think I am going to get the light.

When I am playing and I strum a chord, I get a sort of buzz. Normally this means I am not pressing down hard enough but I have the strings against the fret board and they still do it. Why? I can't get them to stop. Thanks.
 
Mar 23, 2010 at 1:53 AM Post #12 of 14

Omega

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Quote:

Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My fingers aren't calloused yet. I hope they do soon, they limit my playing time to about an hour then 20 or 30 minutes off. But I have a friend who is going to help me. I have watched tutorials and from what I have seen the hardest part is getting the bridge pins out. Any tips?


Yeah, I second chadbang's suggestion to get a string winder. Should look like this and be cheaper than $3. For removing the bridge pins, you just want a little lever that will pry them up and out, without scratching anything. If you look in the picture for that string winder...at the end of the green winder, you can see a notch that is the size of a bridge pin. Use that to pry out the pins.

Quote:

Originally Posted by unl3a5h3d /img/forum/go_quote.gif
When I am playing and I strum a chord, I get a sort of buzz.


With any guitar, one needs to find their personal balance with the instrument. Some like the "action" high, so that the strings sit far above the frets. This eliminates the fret buzz you mention, but makes it harder to play, especially fast music. Some like the action low, which plays better, but makes for fret buzzing. What you hear when frets buzz is the string vibrating up against the neighboring fret...this is common, especially with cheaper guitars. More expensive guitars have more rigid necks and harder, hand-filed frets that are specifically trimmed to fit the player's taste. Eh. You're learning, so figure out where you like the action, and get used to a little buzz. If you listen closely to a lot of recorded music, you will hear this fret buzz...it is difficult to eliminate.

Sounds like you need someone to show you around the guitar...there's no substitute for personal 1:1 instruction. I should know...I bought a guitar the day before leaving town many moons ago. A friend came with me to the store, we bought me the cheapest model, and he showed me how to play G,C and D open chords, and how to read tabs. Then I taught myself to play songs on the radio, reading and writing tabs from the internet (which was like the Wild West, back then
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. Anyway, long story short, I developed a lot of bad habits that are very difficult to un-learn, and continue to prevent me from playing really well. I wish I had ponied up for some real lessons.
 
Mar 23, 2010 at 2:47 AM Post #13 of 14

intoflatlines

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Nanowebs are much smoother and keep you from building callouses quickly it's true. However I enjoy the sound very much and although it's not quite as bright as a set of "regular" strings they keep a fresh sound for much longer than regular strings ever could. I used to play on Martin Bronze medium strings and they would be dead within a day of putting them on, max.
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Mar 24, 2010 at 2:37 AM Post #14 of 14

unl3a5h3d

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Well I have done some research and some people said that the buzzing could be from the neck of my guitar not being straight. Tomorrow I am heading over to the local music store and I am going to ask them about all of that. I will pick up some strings while I am at it. And I have a string winder, and it has the bridge pin prier outer lol.
 

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