RCA solderless connectors opinions
May 20, 2012 at 5:51 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 7

madmalkav

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As I have only found the valab ones -looks really good- and some chinese ones marked as Nakamichi -not real Nakamichi as the real one dissapeared 10 years ago and never did connectors AFAIK-, I must ask, is there anything wrong with this solderless terminals? Should I totally avoid them for any reason? Is there any other RCA solderless connector that you know of and can recommend me?
 
May 20, 2012 at 6:29 PM Post #2 of 7

Bones13

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There are those that eschew soldered connections in favor of cold pressed compression connections.  If you think about it, there are a lot of screw type compression connectors for 120 VAC.  The miniscule current in interconnects should not stress the connection.  Non soldered joints might be susceptible to corrosion over time.
 
In my opinion there are good solder joints, and bad solder joints.  Good compression fittings with screws or whatever and bad.
 
I think using a set of screw type connectors is a great way to get to try more than one type of wire.
 
May 21, 2012 at 5:02 PM Post #3 of 7

madmalkav

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I work almost daily with data cables, so I'm quite more confortable with crimping and screwing than soldering. If a good non-solder connection is good enough, I will go for them.

Thanks for the info .
 
May 21, 2012 at 11:04 PM Post #4 of 7

liamstrain

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Canare makes wide range of RCA and 75 ohm crimp coaxial connectors.
 
So does Connectronics (both crimp and compression types)
 
Markertek carries both. 
 
Jun 1, 2012 at 5:56 PM Post #6 of 7

SiBurning

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Canare's tools and dies can get expensive. I went with Paladin Tools for the lower cost. Whichever way you go, any connection requires matching up several different sizes and shapes between the connector, the cable, and the die. I went for the Paladin Tools 1300 and a 2549 die which has square/diamond crimps of 0.042 and 0,052, and hex crimps of 0.063, 0.255, and 0.324 somethings or other. It's close enough to match with Canare's L4CFB cables and parts, and Paladin sells dies individually, while Canare only seems to sell them in sets. Of course, you also need a heavy duty cable cutter to cut through the cable straight and clean, as well as some way to strip the cable down to three different sizes.
 

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