Question and help about burning in my new mdr 7506
May 14, 2015 at 8:08 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 14

ryokun

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So I recently bought a sony mdr 7506 and use this --> http://www.tekfusiontechnologies.com/Burner/Burner.php on 75% of max volume for 4 hours and I just read the warning that I should not set the volume for more than 50%.. did it damage my headphone? I can't tell...
 
May 16, 2015 at 8:52 PM Post #4 of 14

cel4145

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I just read the warning that I should not set the volume for more than 50%.. did it damage my headphone? I can't tell...


That depends on the device being used, and the actual amount of power put out by the headphone amp in the device being used at that point on the volume control. And then some headphones are harder to drive and need more power. In other words, it's terrible advice to specify a volume number like that because it varies from equipment setup to equipment setup.

The general best practice is to turn it up a bit loud, but not so loud that your headphones start to distort. So if your headphones weren't distorting at the volume you had it set on, I wouldn't worry about it.
 
May 17, 2015 at 12:46 AM Post #5 of 14

deevey

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Having used and abused my MDR-V6's for 17+ years and Bought a pair of 7506's as a replacement a few years back, can tell you that IMHO .. 
 
1. 7506's and V6's take YEARS to burn in to the point that there is any audiable difference from new. My 17 yr old V6's passed the Noticeable stage after about 5 years of 6hr a day listening at high volumes where the top end cooled off "ever so slightly" making them a little kinder on the ears on long sessions. 
 
2. Seriously doubt you did any damage, they can take really REALLY high levels for ages without any damage to the drivers unless they were cranked to distortion levels. 
 
3. Velour pads will make far more of a difference than burn in with those cans :wink: 
 
In other words, it's terrible advice to specify a volume number like that because it varies from equipment setup to equipment setup.
 

 
Amen to that - its like specifying that you need to set a microwave to 50% without specifying the wattage. 
 
May 17, 2015 at 12:51 AM Post #6 of 14

Music Alchemist

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  Having used and abused my MDR-V6's for 17+ years and Bought a pair of 7506's as a replacement a few years back, can tell you that IMHO .. 
 
1. 7506's and V6's take YEARS to burn in to the point that there is any audiable difference from new. My 17 yr old V6's passed the Noticeable stage after about 5 years of 6hr a day listening at high volumes where the top end cooled off "ever so slightly" making them a little kinder on the ears on long sessions.

 
That's actually pretty interesting. The treble on my 7506 is kind of at the "murder your ears with nastiness" level sometimes. The rest of the frequencies have no real problems, at least compared to that. If I wasn't so lazy, I'd just tame the treble with EQ...but I'm so busy trying out other headphones, hehe.
 
May 17, 2015 at 12:56 AM Post #7 of 14

deevey

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Its one of the things that gives them a ridiculous sense of detail, needed in a studio environment.
 
But it can also bring out the worst in recordings and audio sources that have alot of otherwise inaudiable HF "hiss" and phasing in the top end of MP3's which can also make them really annoying for day to day listening. 
 
There is a thread somewhere about modding them with a Filter to roll off the top end. 
 
May 17, 2015 at 12:58 AM Post #8 of 14

Music Alchemist

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  Its one of the things that gives them a ridiculous sense of detail, needed in a studio environment.
 
But it can also bring out the worst in recordings and audio sources that have alot of otherwise inaudiable HF "hiss" and phasing in the top end of MP3's which can also make them really annoying for day to day listening. 

 
What confuses me is why you would want so much extra treble, beyond neutral, if you were trying to hear the truth in the recording itself. Perhaps it's to hear problems you otherwise couldn't hear with a balanced frequency response? (Which you alluded to.)
 
Anyway, it's one of my favorite headphones despite that little problem. Listening to it now and having goosebumps.
 
May 17, 2015 at 2:10 AM Post #9 of 14

deevey

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The top end is bright, but not that bright IMHO, just that the rest of the response is pretty flat that the slightly enhanced top end sticks out like a sore thumb - like adding a little chili to an otherwise bland dish, you'll instantly pick up the chili but not much else. 
 
But yes, for recording the enhanced highs make the likes of de-essing vocals and filtering out nasty resonance from filters much easier to pick up, which may or may not have been a factor during their design, who knows.
 
Personally I like a nice crisp top end on headphones from 10k up - something that many other manufacturers seem to shy away from in favor of enhanced Bass and Mid, perhaps its due to most adults not being able to hear HF above 15khz at all, "so why bother". 
 
The DIY mod I was talking about was "Frans Superlux Filter" BTW, which apparently helps tame the top end without changing the headphone signature too much - it might be worthwhile you looking into, I read it was tried with success on the V6 / 7506. 
 
May 17, 2015 at 1:54 PM Post #10 of 14

manbear

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So I recently bought a sony mdr 7506 and use this --> http://www.tekfusiontechnologies.com/Burner/Burner.php on 75% of max volume for 4 hours and I just read the warning that I should not set the volume for more than 50%.. did it damage my headphone? I can't tell...



% of volume is meaningless. 50% volume on computer X with headphones A could be a completely different level than 50% on computer Y with headphones B. So don't worry about 50% vs. 75%. There's no exact limit. 

If you can't tell, then no, your headphones aren't damaged. They would sound bad if they were. 
 
May 17, 2015 at 2:12 PM Post #11 of 14

cel4145

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% of volume is meaningless. 50% volume on computer X with headphones A could be a completely different level than 50% on computer Y with headphones B. So don't worry about 50% vs. 75%. There's no exact limit. 

If you can't tell, then no, your headphones aren't damaged. They would sound bad if they were. 


Isn't it crazy that they would provide those instructions?

1. Adjust your PC's speaker volume to 50% of full volume.
2. Plug your Earphones into your PC speaker jack.
3. Click on Play button.
4. Let the entire playlist complete. The player will automatically loop the playlist.

http://www.tekfusiontechnologies.com/Burner/tekfusion-burn-in-guide.php

Definitely not someone you want to buy audio products from. (lol)
 
May 17, 2015 at 9:07 PM Post #13 of 14

tomb

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Dec 29, 2015 at 6:11 PM Post #14 of 14

mbnt

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  Having used and abused my MDR-V6's for 17+ years and Bought a pair of 7506's as a replacement a few years back, can tell you that IMHO .. 
 
1. 7506's and V6's take YEARS to burn in to the point that there is any audiable difference from new. My 17 yr old V6's passed the Noticeable stage after about 5 years of 6hr a day listening at high volumes where the top end cooled off "ever so slightly" making them a little kinder on the ears on long sessions. 
 
2. Seriously doubt you did any damage, they can take really REALLY high levels for ages without any damage to the drivers unless they were cranked to distortion levels. 
 
3. Velour pads will make far more of a difference than burn in with those cans :wink: 
 
 
Amen to that - its like specifying that you need to set a microwave to 50% without specifying the wattage. 


I know this is slightly old, but I have had a pair of 7506s since 1997, definitely my second pair of great cans. My first good cans were the MDR-V6s, which my brother happily uses.
 
I have to agree with the years of use for the burn-in, my 7506s are a glorious 18 years old at this point, and only this year I changed the pads from the gross pleather to Beyerdynamics velour ear pads. I SO wish I did the replacements sooner, because it is a insane, sweet-sounding difference!
 
Recently my dad tried them out and was impressed by its sound, so we got him a pair as well, along with velour pads right from the start, and I don't know why, but he seems to come off thinking they don't sound *exactly* the same as mine.  I was looking for burn-in solutions and came across this thread, and just had to post.  I am a true believer in the whole burning-in process.
 
I'm going to try burning the new 7506s in with files from audiocheck.net.  I was just happy to see this.
 
Thanks for letting me rant, and hope everyone has a great Holiday and a super awesome New Year!
 

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