Please give some suggestion for 50's or 60's best jazz piano recording
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congqin

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Hello, all. Recentlly, I'm listening jazz piano music. Any suggestion that you may think the one is "landmark"?

Thanks
Cong
 
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catachresis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by congqin
Hello, all. Recentlly, I'm listening jazz piano music. Any suggestion that you may think the one is "landmark"?

Thanks
Cong



a) Herbie Hancock - Maiden Voyage would do you no harm. I've got a Blue Note sampler of his original version of "Cantaloupe Island" which is pretty superior (-not sure if that's on the above).

b) Lots of references to how great Bill Evans is on this forum. My fav. is Undercurrent but the consensus seems to be that Waltz for Debbie (?) is his best. Hard to go wrong with Bill Evans anyway.

c) I'm very fond of some of Thelonius Monk's early 60s work on Columbia, like his solo collection Straight, No Chaser.
 
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slt

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As mentioned above, Bill Evans, Thelonius Monk and Herbie Hancock are definitely some to check out. I would also recommend Bud Powell and Oscar Peterson and if you go into the 70's there are of course Keith Jarrett and Chick Corea.

It is difficult to name one record as being the "landmark", but some great ones are:

Bill Evans - Sunday at the Village Vanguard + Waltz for Debby

Thelonius Monk - Brilliant Corners

Bud Powell - The Amazing Bud Powell Vol. 1

Oscar Peterson Trio Plus One

Keith Jarrett - Solo Concerts: Bremen and Lausanne
 
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ingmarwa

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All the mentioned albums are great. For me, however, this one is a simple one: Jazz på Svenska (Jazz in Swedish) by the Swedish pianist Jan Johansson. Check it out
 
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VicAjax

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Thelonious Monk is my favorite jazz pianist of any decade... and probably my favorite composer as well.

his albums Criss Cross comes to mind, or for solo, Alone in San Francisco.
 
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White Fox

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Hard to say what is the 'landmark' recording for me, but if I had to choose a favorite set today, I would say: Herbie Hancock The Complete Blue Note Sixties Sessions. Not one recording, but it's fascinating to follow the progression from one session to the next. So many great players and bands on these albums...

If that's too much to start, then try Maiden Voyage first (as suggested) or Empyrean Isles. The latter features the same band as Maiden minus George Coleman (tenor), recorded a year before. Empyrean shows many styles of jazz that were going on at the time (1964) - awesome stuff.
 
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catachresis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Newbiez
Some Dave Brubeck?


You just can't fault Time Out and Time Further Out. But back in the 70s when I was a weasely adolescent silding my way into jazz, I thought the Fantasy label reissue of two albums (can't remember original titles) under a single double-album gatefold - Stardust -- was pretty sublime. Very ethereal. If it was the fifties and you had just fallen in love with the sophisticated 17-year-old who worked the perfume counter at the drug store. . . .

http://cd.ciao.co.uk/Stardust_Dave_B...971936/TabId/4
 
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gordolindsay

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You could check out some of Chick Corea's stuff. The albums I know and love are his Piano Improvisations Vol.1 & 2. Also there is an album with him and Herbie Hancock, it's called An Evening with Corea and Hancock. All three are wonderful piano albums.
 
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Ben Webster's recordings at the Mont Martre Jazz Hus in Copenhagen while he lived there are fine documents of him and the "Hi-Fi" at the time.
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by catachresis
You just can't fault Time Out and Time Further Out. But back in the 70s when I was a weasely adolescent silding my way into jazz, I thought the Fantasy label reissue of two albums (can't remember original titles) under a single double-album gatefold - Stardust -- was pretty sublime. Very ethereal. If it was the fifties and you had just fallen in love with the sophisticated 17-year-old who worked the perfume counter at the drug store. . . .

http://cd.ciao.co.uk/Stardust_Dave_B...971936/TabId/4



I own the vinyl copies of those original reissue
. Who would have called this music the Cool jazz after listening to the track 'Look for the Silver Lining'. It's unmistakenly an all out, fast, upbeat, and swinging jazz in fire.

Another album in which you would capture the pianist Brubeck at his finest hour is the ablum, Jazz Goes to College. That 8 minutes piano solo from Dave Brubeck on the very first track is just a flight of new fresh and tasteful ideas, seeminglessly following one after another. No other jazz pianist I've yet heard captures the large mass of audience in almost a contagious way as Brubeck does with the musical ideas. And I did spend a quite a bit of time listening to almost everything from the prominent jazz pianists from that era and beyond.

A terrifc album that I definately think would make a good addition to anyone's jazz collection. This is actually the album that made Brubeck appear on the cover of the Time Magazine, the first jazz musician to do so after Louis Armstrong. If that satisfies the 'landmark' recording criteria.
 
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I'm enjoying Bill Evans' recording, Interlude, on vinyl right now. It was recorded during that time. Highly recommended listening.
 
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catachresis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by holeinmywallet
I own the vinyl copies of those original reissue
. Who would have called this music the Cool jazz after listening to the track 'Look for the Silver Lining'. It's unmistakenly an all out, fast, upbeat, and swinging jazz in fire.

Another album in which you would capture the pianist Brubeck at his finest hour is the ablum, Jazz Goes to College. That 8 minutes piano solo from Dave Brubeck on the very first track is just a flight of new fresh and tasteful ideas, seeminglessly following one after another. No other jazz pianist I've yet heard captures the large mass of audience in almost a contagious way as Brubeck does with the musical ideas. And I did spend a quite a bit of time listening to almost everything from the prominent jazz pianists from that era and beyond.

A terrifc album that I definately think would make a good addition to anyone's jazz collection. This is actually the album that made Brubeck appear on the cover of the Time Magazine, the first jazz musician to do so after Louis Armstrong. If that satisfies the 'landmark' recording criteria.




Brubeck and Desmond are infectious - I can't think of a more acute word for the difficulty of disliking their music. I think everything they do swings a little bit, just like everything Monk does strides. Brubeck is one of the most felicitious manifestations of the 'white' side of jazz -- the worst I've heard imputed to his songs is that they're too light-weight, too poppy because they miss the core rhythms -that can also be cliches- of blues piano. Most of the people who sleight Brubeck never give any serious consideration to the manifest technical virtuosity of both Brubeck and Desmond's performances. I dig blues piano, but as I got older and got over having to side with the most ponderous stereotypes of serious jazz, I realised that I'm mad about Brubeck too. I'll keep the peepers peeled for Jazz Goes to College.
 
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VicAjax

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if you want to hear the most adventurous jazz pianist ever... pick up either of Cecil Taylor's albums on Blue Note: Unit Structures and Conquistador. Taylor was years ahead of his time, and the former album is a masterpiece of free jazz.
 
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robert

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Andrew Hill. less atonal than Taylor, but edgy. more of his 60s stuff is showing up. 'Point of Departure' is very well thought of. don't think he goes back to the 50s.
 
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