Photo-Fi: Do you shoot in RAW or JPEG?
Apr 8, 2007 at 7:51 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 26

Amuse

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For the people who have cameras that can shoot RAW or JPEG, what do you shoot in?

Well, with my D50, I've been shooting in JPEG-Fine and maximum resolution all the time since I think it's easier to use/process in PS7. But lately I've been thinking of shooting in RAW and try to take advantage of it.

So in comparison for head-fi'ers, is shooting RAW and JPG just like listening to FLAC and MP3?
RAW = FLAC lossless
JPG fine = MP3 320kbps
JPG normal = MP3 192kbps
JPG basic = MP3 128kbps

Anyways, are there any advantages of shooting in RAW over JPEG?
Disadvantages?
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 7:53 AM Post #2 of 26

jmmtn4aj

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Yes. Damn long transfer times..

I shoot in JPEG because I'm not shooting seriously. But if I were, I'd do it in RAW so I could fiddle around with the white balance
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 8:24 AM Post #4 of 26

rb67

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I only shoot raw whenever I have a really important shot that might need some editing. The only real advantage of RAW is more flexibility when it comes to editing white balance and levels. I'm sure other members can explain it better than I, but unless you need to do those two things in PS, there really isn't any point in shooting in RAW. The JPEG algorithm on the D50 is fine and you certainly save time and space. And yes, it is also easier to process in PS. RAW takes a bit more work.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 12:50 PM Post #5 of 26

necropimp

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since i only use a 16MB card the uncompressed mode on my camera won't work (files are ~22MB each)
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 1:02 PM Post #6 of 26

Fallingwater

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Jpeg.
Raw is good when you want to post-process the hell out of your pictures, but all I generally do is a "auto levels" and that's it. High-resolution jpeg allows me to fit MANY more pictures on the card.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 2:26 PM Post #7 of 26

Mr.PD

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I shoot in both. My Canon 20D has the option of both.
Every photo is taken in both RAW and jpeg. I get six photos each time I press the shutter release. Three different exposure levels in both RAW and jpeg.
biggrin.gif


In preview on my computer jpeg loads faster so I can go through all my photos quicker.
For fast clean ups and uploading to Shutterfly for 5X7 prints jpeg works great. RAW is just as easy to work with in Photoshop, it just takes an extra step or two.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 2:56 PM Post #8 of 26

skeeder

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same here, My D50 is a great camera (mostly because of the lenses) however, RAW is a hog. I shoot in RAW if its a none serious event, or I'm going to be taking a ton of pictures.

The main advantage of shooting in raw is using RAWeditors to tweak the picture instead of just editing a jpg. it holds more detail.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 3:13 PM Post #9 of 26

lan

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I only shoot in RAW. I find most images white balance and metering not where I'd like. I like to edit a little also so prefer to edit in 16bit and the wider color space that RAW allows me.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 11:22 PM Post #13 of 26

AudioNoob

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Raw vs jpeg, you will lose some detail in jpeg depending on your camera's image processor but until you shoot something dead serious, no need to shoot raw, you can still fiddle with jpegs.

Almost all digital photography needs minor sharpening out of the camera, remember that though, given that your in-camera sharpening is off.
 
Apr 8, 2007 at 11:39 PM Post #15 of 26

kin0kin

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I shoot RAW as it bypasses the camera's image processing engine, and gives you more control over post processing image and correcting flaws. Jpeg if you are most confident with what you are doing, or wanna get the most out of your battery and memory capacity.
 

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