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Objectivists board room

Discussion in 'Sound Science' started by joe bloggs, May 28, 2015.
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  1. JaeYoon
    hey does anyone here still buy CDS.

    I buy them, but then I just rip it via EAC to FLAC. keep it in my collection forever and keep the cds safely in a container in my garage.

    I figure if I do this, online music stores are better. I guess it's nice for cds to have artwork and paper stuff, but I end up never looking at them sadly.
     
  2. bigshot
    I buy tons of CDs. The price on them has dropped, especially in classical box sets where you can get 50 CDs for $75. I too rip everything to my media server at AAC 256 VBR and then stash the original CDs in boxes in the garage. Right now I'm ripping 5 albums by Dave Grusin and a box set of Earth Wind and Fire. The Frank Zappa Halloween 77 box et too. I do the same with DVDs, which I buy by the bundle. Lately, I've become interested in exploring British TV. I'll buy season box sets from Amazon UK and rip them onto my media server. Lots of classic programs that we never got over here in the States.

    I really don't care about packaging. It's all about content for me.
     
    JaeYoon likes this.
  3. SilverEars
    Now a days you get various streaming services available to make things much more convenient than ripping and storing it. You can stream music anywhere from the cloud. Like Tidal for example is a popular streaming service people subscribe to. You got all the music available in the cloud(stream from anywhere with internet access), and no need to go out buy, rip, and store. A caveat would be that the streaming service catalog would be limited, and may not have specific cds one is looking for.

    Buying physical media would be more of draw for doing it for collection sake.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2017
    JaeYoon likes this.
  4. Mr Rick
    If I find something I particularly like on Spotify, I go to Amazon and buy the CD.:ksc75smile:

    Years ago I did the same thing with radio and LPs.
     
  5. sonitus mirus
    I chose to use Google Music as my streaming music service. I would use iTunes, but iTunes doesn't work on everything I might use, where Google Music does, including on practically every iOS device.

    With Google Music, I do purchase CDs that are not available to stream, because of licensing or other reasons, and rip them as vbr -0 mp3 files to be uploaded. I, too, store the discs away in a box. Once I've uploaded a CD to Google Music, it is thoroughly integrated with the service. All of the album information, artist bios, and artwork are included. Every artist, album, and song that I import are available to use in playlists, they appear randomly when I shuffle my entire library, and songs from these CDs often appear on any radio station if it is related to the artist, song, or genre.

    I uploaded 2 CDs from Tool about six years ago and I still hear them all the time with Google Music even after going through at least 3 laptops/desktop PCs and 4 phones. I still have all of the CDs that were uploaded, but I haven't needed them.

    Tool.PNG
     
    JaeYoon likes this.
  6. Argyris Contributor
    While I do download a lot of music these days, I buy CDs as well. I'm aided in the fact that I seldom buy current music, so I can get a lot of stuff used and for cheap. I like to shop the bargain bins and thrift stores and often find stuff for a buck a disc, which means even if I only like a single song on the album, it's still cheaper in most cases than downloading digitally. There's a place near me called 2nd & Charles that sells virtually all used stuff which has become one of my favorite sources (get it? 2nd & sounds like secondhand). Of course when scrounging the bargain sections you're often limited to 90s pop, a bunch of obscure stuff and the occasional classical album, but recently this was exactly what I was looking for so I ended up saving a mint and finding some new stuff I otherwise would never have come across.

    I rip into FLAC for archival purposes (which is what the format was originally intended for), fill in the metadata I care about, dump the CD in storage somewhere, then convert the archived version to VBR AAC for my library. The idea is that if for whatever reason I want to switch lossy formats, or if the format I'm currently using gets significantly more efficient, I can just reencode from my archive rather than rip all the CDs again.

    This reminds me: I've picked up a few albums along the way that I haven't even gotten around to listening to yet. Something for a rainy day.
     
    JaeYoon likes this.
  7. JaeYoon
    yeah FLAC for me is a divine blessing for archiving. I recently converted my library into VBR AAC 256. If you want to change lossy formats, the original audio file is always archived there in FLAC.
     
  8. bigshot
    My interests are beyond streaming now. I wish there was cheap streaming was available when I was first starting out, but now my interests are more specialized.
     
  9. pinnahertz
    Streaming obviously depends on a decent internet connection. In my mobile life, believe it or not, that doesn't always exist. At some point I need a local copy, and to keep me thoroughly spoiled I'd like to have my entire library with me. So far I haven't pulled that off, even for audio, because I don't have one portable device with enough capacity, so it remains a combination of portable storage, streaming/cloud and a media server (I use PLEX). Still buying CDs where possible, especially used ones. Best deal on earth, IMO, pennies on the dollar, and uncompressed, permanent copies.
     
  10. Niouke
    Nowadays they make nice DAP's like the Fiio X5-3, with dual SD slots and 32Gb internal. That's enough to have 20K+ mp3's and 800 spotify tracks synchronized. I wish I knew earlier that a lot of the sound quality features on it are snake oil, I would have gone for something more simple with better battery, if such thing exists.

    @sonitus mirus tell us how the RP-280's sound to you, I have the RP-250's and I found that while the bass is very present, some frequencies are over represented and require some EQ. I did remove some trebles also but overall I didn't need to go beyond +-3db correction, Overall I'm very happy with them, it's my first pair of decent speakers (If you exclude the vintage JMlab DB18's I stole from my parents).

    Now I'm looking into improving my room while conserving madame's approval. Not easy when you don't know much.
     
  11. 93EXCivic
    I buy CDs still (probably one or two new ones a month plus sometimes used ones from thrift stores). I rip them to 16/44.1 FLACs. I also stream on Spotify Premium (but mostly to find new music).

    I also like to buy CDs as I feel more money probably goes to the artist then they get from streaming services.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
    JaeYoon likes this.
  12. bigshot
    I solved the storage problem with an iKlip micro SD card reader for my phone... http://amzn.to/2zHQc5c That with a couple of 256 gig micro SD cards can hold a huge chunk of music.
     
  13. Strangelove424
    I play ripped CDs at home and Spotify on the road. I gave up Spotify Premium though. Since I mainly use it in the car I can't tell the quality difference. If they used better masters, or allowed me to choose which master of an album I want to listen to, I'd use it at home and pay premium again. As it stands, I'm more likely to find the kind of mastering I want by buying a used CD. Those bins filled with cheap CDs have become an oasis. You can find all sorts of great music in those bins.
     
    pibroch likes this.
  14. sonitus mirus
    Just finished unpacking everything and setting it all up. For now I've kept the same general arrangement, except that I have moved my desk 3.5 feet from the back wall. The speakers are a little over a foot from the back wall and a tad over 6 feet apart, slightly toed in. I sit in the middle, about 5.5 feet from each speaker. I can easily roll my chair back a foot to get a more proper distance. It is about the same presentation that I was experiencing with my old speaker setup. I was meticulous about the distances and positioning.

    Considering that I was using speakers with a single 8" woofer with a 1" tweeter, the new speakers with dual 8" woofers are not as bass-heavy. Trebles from the horns are louder, making struck cymbals more prominent. The vocals are also a bit louder in relation to the overall sound that I was hearing before. Those enormous and heavy pads I have the speakers sitting on really seem to work. They were for subwoofers, but they are good for the floor speakers. As I am typing this, Timestretch (West Coast Lo Fi Remix) from Bassnectar just began playing in my shuffled library. There is plenty of bass. I am actually surprised that the bass is not more boomy and overwhelming for this small, 150 sqft room. I will have to take some measurements and see how it comes out, even though I probably won't be able to make any changes right away.

    To me, these are better performing speakers and generally have a better upper range, with treble and mids being more pronounced than my KRK powered speakers. I normally listen at very low volume levels. My KRK speakers would automatically shut off every 30 minutes if I didn't raise the volume now and then, as it considered the signal to be too low. The sound level is about the same when I have the volume at the normal position I tend to listen to for extended periods of time. However, the Klipsch speakers gain in volume, considerably. I could play a song with the volume knob at 40-50% with the KRK speakers, but these seem much louder. I'm sure it is mostly because of the more pronounce trebles and mids, since these frequencies tend to seem louder, equal-loudness contours and all.

    Really happy with these speakers.
     
  15. bigshot
    Klipsch speakers are horn loaded, so they tend to be a little louder and more midrange heavy. That's actually fine by me. I have Klipsch center speaker, and it's perfect for my purposes.
     
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