Notebook enough to enjoy DT770 Pro 250Ohm?
May 8, 2012 at 5:50 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 16

Pr0bability

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Hey there,

just a quick question. I'm considering buying the Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro 250Ohm, but I'm on a limited budget. I listen mostly to Drum'n'Bass, Dubstep, Reggae, Dub, some rock, on my notebook. My question is, should I go for it or it will be useless without a DAC/AMP? I never used any expensive headphones, currently being on Sennheiser HD201, so any step up in quality will be appreciated.

My notebook is: HP DV7-6050

Supossedly with some integrated Beats crap. All info on my audio card is that its Audio Adapter is Intel Cougar Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller [B2]. Which I'm not sure can deal with the impedance.

What do you think?
 
Thanks.
 
May 8, 2012 at 6:01 PM Post #2 of 16

jupitreas

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Its difficult to foresee if your notebook will be able to drive the 250Ohm DT770 without actually trying it or having access to some sort of performance measurements. With this said, common wisdom would indicate that it is very likely that the notebook won't be sufficient to drive these headphones.
 
Luckily, even a cheap amp like a FiiO E6 can drive them adequately. If you discover that your notebook is not sufficient, it is not necessary for you to immediately go and buy a very expensive amp.
 
May 8, 2012 at 6:05 PM Post #3 of 16

MalVeauX

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Quote:
Hey there,

just a quick question. I'm considering buying the Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro 250Ohm, but I'm on a limited budget. I listen mostly to Drum'n'Bass, Dubstep, Reggae, Dub, some rock, on my notebook. My question is, should I go for it or it will be useless without a DAC/AMP? I never used any expensive headphones, currently being on Sennheiser HD201, so any step up in quality will be appreciated.

My notebook is: HP DV7-6050

Supossedly with some integrated Beats crap. All info on my audio card is that its Audio Adapter is Intel Cougar Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller [B2]. Which I'm not sure can deal with the impedance.

What do you think?
 
Thanks.

 
Heya,
 
Fiio E10
 
The notebook's internal audio equipment is simply not going to be enough to properly drive the 250ohm DT770 to full dynamics with over head.
 
Very best,
 
May 8, 2012 at 6:24 PM Post #4 of 16

jupitreas

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Quote:
 
The notebook's internal audio equipment is simply not going to be enough to properly drive the 250ohm DT770 to full dynamics with over head.

How can you know this for sure? This is a guess that is stated as if it was fact. Admittedly, it is a pretty good guess and is almost certainly good advice, but I'm just saying, lets not make such statements without having all the data...
 
May 8, 2012 at 6:50 PM Post #5 of 16

CyBeR

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My MacBook Pro drives them to satisfaction. My iPhone, however, just does not have the guts to pull it off.
 
I'm not saying there's no room for improvement, but if one is on a budget, the amp can be forgone. Many times here on head-fi people will give the impression that headphones will not function without an amp, or will not sound better than a pair of iBuds. This is not true. 
 
May 8, 2012 at 7:49 PM Post #6 of 16

BrownBear

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I know they're different cans, but my laptop and iPod drive my Pro/4AA good enough to enjoy them. They are 250 ohms as well, which is why I figured I'd chime in. But I agree that you should probably listen to tell, or maybe even pick up an E6 like suggested. Just my opinions.
 
May 8, 2012 at 8:01 PM Post #7 of 16

MalVeauX

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How can you know this for sure? This is a guess that is stated as if it was fact. Admittedly, it is a pretty good guess and is almost certainly good advice, but I'm just saying, lets not make such statements without having all the data...

 
Heya,
 
Just because it creates enough volume for listening at moderate levels doesn't mean it's receiving the right amount of voltage to properly drive the headphone to full dynamic range which it was designed for.
 
Call it an educated guess. But let your ears be the judge. Maybe that laptop's "integrated subwoofer" can do 30hz at the same volume level as 2khz too.
 
Very best,
 
May 8, 2012 at 8:04 PM Post #8 of 16

ssrock64

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It is likely that your notebook will not drive a the 250-ohm version to anywhere near its full potential, but being a first-time listener of high-end gear you probably wouldn't notice much (if any) difference. However, if you get them and they sound horribly thin or odd, try an E6 with them to see what happens.
 
Also, a warning about Beats Audio: Do not try to uninstall or disable the software. It'll mess with your EQ settings permanently because Beats Electronics wants consumers to think that it was the Beats Audio making their laptop speakers sound passable, leading to regret about uninstalling it.
 
May 9, 2012 at 12:52 AM Post #9 of 16

Pr0bability

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It is likely that your notebook will not drive a the 250-ohm version to anywhere near its full potential, but being a first-time listener of high-end gear you probably wouldn't notice much (if any) difference. However, if you get them and they sound horribly thin or odd, try an E6 with them to see what happens.
 
Also, a warning about Beats Audio: Do not try to uninstall or disable the software. It'll mess with your EQ settings permanently because Beats Electronics wants consumers to think that it was the Beats Audio making their laptop speakers sound passable, leading to regret about uninstalling it.

Been there, done that. Starting to hate notebooks, but what can one soon leaving for a uni do...
 
Anyways, thank you for your replies guys, I think I will try to scrape a bit more money and try to get me an AMP.
 
May 9, 2012 at 3:54 AM Post #10 of 16

CyBeR

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Just because it creates enough volume for listening at moderate levels doesn't mean it's receiving the right amount of voltage to properly drive the headphone to full dynamic range which it was designed for.

 
Actually, it does. Dynamic Range is the difference between the lowest produced volume and the highest. Low volume is pretty easy to achieve of course, which leaves high volume to be interesting. The volume produced by any audio transducer is directly related to the amplitude of the signal one drives it with. Amplitude in electrical signals is measured in Volts. So basically, once you achieve a certain volume, your headphone will be driven at a certain amount of Volts. It does not matter wether or not a dedicated amp is involved for this: X volt equals X loudness. Applying more Volts means more loudness. So if whatever volume you're getting is satisfactory, that's that for the voltage.
 
What matters more is the current-generating ability of the amplifier, and this is where portables often fail. Interestingly, a higher-impedance headphone actually helps to prevent this problem as it will allow less current to flow through it than a lower-impedence headphone. But at the cost of requiring instead a higher voltage for the same volume. 
 
May 9, 2012 at 4:44 AM Post #11 of 16

proton007

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Quote:
 
Actually, it does. Dynamic Range is the difference between the lowest produced volume and the highest. Low volume is pretty easy to achieve of course, which leaves high volume to be interesting. The volume produced by any audio transducer is directly related to the amplitude of the signal one drives it with. Amplitude in electrical signals is measured in Volts. So basically, once you achieve a certain volume, your headphone will be driven at a certain amount of Volts. It does not matter wether or not a dedicated amp is involved for this: X volt equals X loudness. Applying more Volts means more loudness. So if whatever volume you're getting is satisfactory, that's that for the voltage.
 
What matters more is the current-generating ability of the amplifier, and this is where portables often fail. Interestingly, a higher-impedance headphone actually helps to prevent this problem as it will allow less current to flow through it than a lower-impedence headphone. But at the cost of requiring instead a higher voltage for the same volume. 

 
True.
Just to add, headphones have wide variations in their impedance at different frequencies (usually highest at the resonant frequency), the spec mentions it at a fixed frequency (like 1kHz), also known as nominal impedance.
For example, the HD650 can touch 450 Ohms at certain frequencies, while being rated at 300 Ohms, so its possible you'll feel some frequencies slightly attenuated if your amp is not capable of handling 450 Ohms.
 
May 9, 2012 at 6:28 AM Post #12 of 16

stv014

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For example, the HD650 can touch 450 Ohms at certain frequencies, while being rated at 300 Ohms, so its possible you'll feel some frequencies slightly attenuated if your amp is not capable of handling 450 Ohms.

 
The amplifier still needs to output exactly the same voltage (and thus lower current and power - as would be expected for something that resonates) at the frequency where the impedance is 450 ohms as it does at 1 kHz. If it increases the voltage to keep the current more constant, that is the result of high output impedance.
 
May 9, 2012 at 6:36 AM Post #13 of 16

stv014

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Quote:
Supossedly with some integrated Beats crap. All info on my audio card is that its Audio Adapter is Intel Cougar Point PCH - High Definition Audio Controller [B2].

 
That does not really tell much, "Intel HD audio" is only an interface standard (like the older AC97 it replaced), rather than an actual codec chip (manufactured by Realtek, Cirrus Logic, IDT, or others) and its implementation. Although they tend to have similar basic output specs (typically ~1.2 Vrms maximum voltage unloaded), but different quality. In any case, try the headphones with what you have, and then you can decide if the onboard audio is worth using. If you have to use the maximum or nearly maximum volume, there is audible distortion, or it sounds worse than from a portable player or other device, then there is a problem.
 
May 9, 2012 at 8:31 AM Post #14 of 16

Pr0bability

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That does not really tell much, "Intel HD audio" is only an interface standard (like the older AC97 it replaced), rather than an actual codec chip (manufactured by Realtek, Cirrus Logic, IDT, or others) and its implementation. Although they tend to have similar basic output specs (typically ~1.2 Vrms maximum voltage unloaded), but different quality. In any case, try the headphones with what you have, and then you can decide if the onboard audio is worth using. If you have to use the maximum or nearly maximum volume, there is audible distortion, or it sounds worse than from a portable player or other device, then there is a problem.

 
As far as I can tell, the Audio codec is this: High Definitiom Audio Codec: IDT 92HD81B1X
 
Not sure if that can tell you something tough :)
 
May 9, 2012 at 9:50 AM Post #15 of 16

stv014

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Well, there are better onboard chips, but it could be OK. The maximum output seems to be typical of onboard codecs, and it may or may not be enough for you listening to your music. As suggested, try it, and then decide if anything (amplifier, DAC) needs to be bought.
 

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