Noise Canceling Only - I don't care about music!
Mar 8, 2006 at 7:33 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 25

DavidFilmer

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My desk at work is under a large rooftop HVAC system which produces a constant low-frequency rumble. To make matters worse, my office has a white-noise system, which I cannot hear but I can feel the sonic pressure (it's quite obvious when the white noise switches off in the evening).

I'm hoping a pair of noise-cancelling headphones will substantially mitigate both of these sound sources.

I will NEVER listen to music (or any other audio source) through these phones. I will wear them nine hours a day sitting at my desk, and their only purpose is to try to make my life a little more bearable by lowering the sonic pressure of my work environment.

Every HP review I've seen focuses a lot of attention on audio fidelity, or how compatible the noise cancelling is while listening to music. I could care less (I might just cut off the audio chord so it doesn't get in the way).

I would appreciate any recommendations for my situation.

Thanks!
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 7:43 PM Post #4 of 25

warpdriver

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Earplugs. Get some cheap foam earplugs from your pharmacy

NC headphones only typically block about 10-15 dB of sound through the spectrum. Earplugs do a lot better.

As far as noise cancellation, dare I say it...the Bose QC2 is probably the better of the cans as far as passive AND active noise cancellation.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 7:48 PM Post #5 of 25

dkjohnso

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I sympathize with you. I used to work in an IT department, and spent about 8 horus a day in a cramped server room. All the server fans, plus the backup battery fans, plus the redundant air-conditioning system added up to a lot of noise. I had to literally yell when someone called me on the phone. I tried all sorts of noise cancelling headphones, to no avail. So I second the earplug recommendation.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 7:53 PM Post #6 of 25

Mercuttio

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Quote:

Originally Posted by warpdriver
Earplugs. Get some cheap foam earplugs from your pharmacy

NC headphones only typically block about 10-15 dB of sound through the spectrum. Earplugs do a lot better.

As far as noise cancellation, dare I say it...the Bose QC2 is probably the better of the cans as far as passive AND active noise cancellation.



I've got to disagree with you there... I found the Q2C to be quite overrated even as a noise canceller. It blocks out lower frequency humming sounds, but has absolutely no insolation against anything in a higher frequency, like voices.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 7:58 PM Post #7 of 25

warpdriver

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mercuttio
I've got to disagree with you there... I found the Q2C to be quite overrated even as a noise canceller. It blocks out lower frequency humming sounds, but has absolutely no insolation against anything in a higher frequency, like voices.


What are you comparing it to?...I'm comparing to other headphones with active noise cancellation. In that regard, the Bose does better than many others...that was my only point. Active noise cancellation is only supposed to affect low frequency noises, and the Bose is as good or better than others in that regard. Pilots use the Bose because it still allows loud warning noises and voices to be heard but it reduces engine noise.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 8:02 PM Post #8 of 25

stewtheking

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My brother used to work in a company that supplied noise-cancelling headsets to protect people's hearing inside tanks/helecopters etc. I won't mention which one. He got the chance to hear many different headsets and this was purely for noise cancelling ability not fidelity.

He bought my dad a pair of Peltor Optime II earmuffs, to use whilst doing noisy DIY. All I can say is I was super-impressed, they really do block out some serious noise, and their large-cup design means that they don't get that hot, wihch I find a problem sometimes wearing 'phones for ages.

http://www.peltor.se/int/Product.asp...&Product_Id=91

They do look a bit... industrial... but they really do work.

Stew
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 8:04 PM Post #9 of 25

kramer5150

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just go to home depot or big-5 and get hearing protection earmuffs... Some spec at 32db, not sure what frequency thats at though, or how much of a vise grip those things need to acquire a tight seal.

Garrett
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 9:16 PM Post #12 of 25

DavidFilmer

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[size=large]I should have mentioned in my original post...[/size]

I also need to be able to hear conversations and other things (computers beeping & chiming, etc) around me - ear plugs or any passive noise-blocking devices are not an optinon.

The only option is something that will help filter the HVAC rumbling and oppressive white noise pressure, but not seriously impede my ability to hear other office sounds (some of which are rather subtle).

So passive abatement is out. I believe that only an active solution will do the job.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 9:25 PM Post #13 of 25

mulletman13

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I have no experience with any noise cancelling headsets, other than I love the feeling it gives you when it feelsl like your ear drums are getting sucked out of your head
smily_headphones1.gif


http://www.johndeeregifts.com/product-product_id/290298

wink.gif
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 10:55 PM Post #14 of 25

threepointone

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I don't know exactly how relevant this is to you, but there's a project for building your own noise cancelling headphones at headwize. Might be better than retail ones, but I'm not sure. I'm guessing you don't particularly know too much about audio DIY; maybe someone here would be willing to make them for you

oh wait, what am I thinking, there's a simpler way! Shure's coming out with that Push-to-hear thing for their IEMS; you might want to try that out when it comes out. Pretty much you can look for the cheapest IEMs you can find, and then connect the PTH module on. When you need to hear something, you just slide the switch and the built in mic pics up the sound and transmits it to your headphones. Note though, from what I've heard, it's not great for listening for long periods of time since the AAA only lasts 1 hour with it on continuously. I'm guessing that doesn't really matter, though.
 
Mar 8, 2006 at 11:11 PM Post #15 of 25

PaulRivers

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DavidFilmer
[size=large]I should have mentioned in my original post...[/size]

I also need to be able to hear conversations and other things (computers beeping & chiming, etc) around me - ear plugs or any passive noise-blocking devices are not an optinon.

The only option is something that will help filter the HVAC rumbling and oppressive white noise pressure, but not seriously impede my ability to hear other office sounds (some of which are rather subtle).

So passive abatement is out. I believe that only an active solution will do the job.



I don't know that this is possible. The only headphones that really don't interfere with non-low noises would be the higher end sennheiser noise cancelling headphones. I have them (the one that are like $150, I think they're the model number is 250 but I'm not sure). I'm really not impressed by their noise cancelling ability, though. I also found that they made my ears feel uncomfortable if I wore them with the noise cancelling on, but no music.

I was able to try to Sony noise cancelling headphones at the same price point ($150-$200). They sell them at best buy, comp usa, etc etc. Their sound is pretty lame, but I thought they really did a good job at noise cancelling (it was at compusa, where people were playing stereos, talking, etc etc). These are the closest I can recommend, although you'll have a little trouble hearing the other ambient noise around you because they're full size headphones (but they won't block things like people talking *nearly* as much as the in-ear phones or earplugs would).

Good luck.
 

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