Need ideas for entry-level jobs
Aug 9, 2010 at 12:39 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 18

Kirosia

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I have learned that my business degree is quite useless without relevant work experience, and I am in desperate need of a job. I require something that will lead to something else, a "foot in the door" so to speak. I'm open to anything involving supply chains, logistics, business/financial analysis, accounting, project management, etc. but am unsure which entry-level positions will lead me to them. Warehouse clerk? Office assistant? Travel rep? Please advise me with your own experiences and expertise. 
 
(If I don't find something soon, I'm going to strap a plush tiger to my back and swan dive off a very short cliff) 
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 12:41 AM Post #2 of 18

mookowz13

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My friend who has a degree in supply chain management started out as a delivery truck driver for UPS and landed a head of operations/planning job out of it.  A friend heading that way was in warehouse receiving at some point (don't know if that helps though).
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 1:09 AM Post #3 of 18

Kirosia

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Alas, I do not have a supply management degree. I am interested in a position in Logistics, I don't mind working shipments as long as I have the ability to advance. (My degree is International Business btw) 
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 5:16 AM Post #6 of 18

ProjectDenz

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You should try various unemployment agencies in your area that may find something for you?
 
I am surprised that your university (college) doesn't do work placements of any kinds, especially for a business degree.
 
Oh well
deadhorse.gif

 
Aug 9, 2010 at 10:19 AM Post #7 of 18

Kirosia

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My college's career services dept. sucks honestly.
 
I'm just wary of recruitment/temp/unemployment agencies, does anyone know any reliable ones in the Boston/Cambridge, MA area? 
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 11:16 AM Post #8 of 18

Omega

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Kirosia, I've noticed a lot of threads about your dissatisfaction with your college/career path, and I think most everyone can sympathize.  It isn't easy, but rest assured that it is a struggle you share with most everyone in the labor force.
 
The truth is, work kind of sucks, and the promise of higher education is falling short in this high-unemployment economy.  Most people spend the majority of their lives searching for a satisfying career that pays well enough to satisfy their desire/ego.  I invested 12 years of post-secondary education, in a field that is "hot" and full of things I love to study.  So you might say that I am one of the lucky few who is able to "do what I love." But even then, I tell you that I spend the majority of my time writing grants and administering/coordinating things...which are not things I particularly enjoy.  The labor market is fickle, but it acts as an evolving equilibrium, where certain trends tend to hold true:
 
i) undesirable jobs tend to come with greater material rewards than pleasant jobs (ie, a garbage man will make a good wage since the job stinks)
ii) it is hard to get into the most competitive markets without the same credentials as the other fish who swim in those markets (ie, I've never met a principal investigator at a top-notch American university without a doctorate, or an architect at a top-flight firm without a solid portfolio)
iii) the best way to land a sweet job is to get lucky or have an inside connection (which I consider very similar to "lucky")
 
If you accept these things, then if you are in a field that requires credientials, get them.  These aren't a guarantee that you will be able to find a good job, but instead a permit to go hunting for one.  If you aren't finding the material rewards that you desire, consider exercising your strengths in a market that is unattractive to the human herd.  If you are looking for a peach of a job...good luck.
 
That said, I must ask--are you actually applying to jobs and getting turned down?  It might help to analyze where in the process you are having difficulties.  In business, I would say if you are getting interviews for 10% of the jobs to which you apply, you are doing well.  Some of those interviews will go well, but they will simply be looking for a different experience/skill set than you have...and in this economy, the supply is sparse and the competition is tough.  So let's say 10-20% of your interviews might result in an offer.  That means, in order to have good chance of multiple offers, you need to be applying to hundreds of jobs.  Don't let the rejections or no-responses turn into heartbreak.  It isn't personal...they don't know you, they are bobbing for apples in a bucket, and you didn't float in front of the recruiter's face at the right place, right time.  As anyone who has been in the role of hiring manager will tell you, it is rare that a job will have the perfect-match candidate....often the manager will be trying to choose amongst candidates who are similarly not-quite-right for the job...especially for entry-level careers.  In that case, any little things you can do to stand out can be the difference that nets you an offer.
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 11:30 AM Post #9 of 18

Kirosia

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Quote:
That said, I must ask--are you actually applying to jobs and getting turned down?  It might help to analyze where in the process you are having difficulties.  In business, I would say if you are getting interviews for 10% of the jobs to which you apply, you are doing well.

Yes, most of my applications are rejected. I apply to approximately 10+ jobs a week, I'd do more but I only apply to those with low/minimal required field experience. I haven't had a single interview/callback in three months of searching. 
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 11:35 AM Post #10 of 18

acidbasement

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Don't know how you feel about working/slacking off in the public sector, but...
Get an entry-level government job.  Doesn't matter what field it's in - cleaning out toilets, call centre... whatever.  Then, once you're in, you can apply for internally-posted jobs, many of which will require people with skills such as the ones you acquired in business school.  In Canada (not sure about Oz, but likely similar), most decent federal government jobs are not posted to the general public - it's mostly internal competitions, which means there is less competition than there would be for an externally-posted job competition.  When I worked for the feds, there were numerous internal job postings sent around by email every day.
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 11:53 AM Post #11 of 18

Deep Funk

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Have you tried catering? I am not talking about fast food but working as a waiter or host, something like that. It is a pretty small world once you have proven yourself and if you are good in making contacts and networking it is one of the fields that is most rewarding.
 
I have had all kinds of jobs but the jobs I prefer still are the under appreciated jobs which require you have to work your way up for once you have some experience and status you get more and more responsibility. Just do not complain, work until you are done and if your body cannot take it anymore, stop. I still remember one of my first long shifts, 10 hours without a serious break or a bite to eat while my colleagues were picking their noses. I was wrecked, but hey I slept like baby. 
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 12:06 PM Post #12 of 18

appophylite

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Have you considered looking outside of your fields of interest at entry level jobs? I spent 4 years working on an Electrical Engineering degree and didn't want to deal with school right away after finishing so I took a job working as a field engineer for an oil industry service provider. The job has nothing to do with electrical engineering and actually, until about a year ago, required no real formal degree of any sort or prior work experience. The work is brutal and the schedule can be exhausting, but because of the time off (I work 2 weeks on and 2 weeks off every month) and my low living expenses, I was able to save a good amount of cash and go back to school to finish a Masters in Engineering Management. I'm still working the field and still working at school to finish my PhD in Engineering, but the upshot was, that in taking a job that had no real relevance to my degree, I was able to get work experience, finish a higher degree (an pay it off too) and make a lot of contacts in the industry and gain a lot of insight on internal jobs that I am interested in when I am done with college opening up. Upshot of it is, sometimes you have to try something you wouldn't expect or think of doing to catch just the break you need.
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 12:58 PM Post #13 of 18

Uncle Erik

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No one has suggested exotic dancing yet?
 
Anyhow, don't be afraid of the temp agencies.  There's one way to tell if they're legit: whether they ask for you payment.  The scummy ones want you to pay some sort of placement fee.  The legitimate ones cost you nothing and charge the employer for placing you.  Go ahead and sign up with the free ones - Manpower, Kelly and others are all good to start with.
 
See if there's a way to get a certificate to be a substitute teacher.  I don't know what it's like back there, but I took the CBEST when I graduated.  It was a piece of cake, I studied a few hours for it.  I haven't done it, but I can sub in California if I want to.  Also think it would let me get an emergency credential if I needed to.  Maybe not what you want, but it'd pay the bills.
 
If you can find some kind of income, even the lousy stuff, you can also volunteer at the kind of business you want.  Not ideal, but most places won't turn away free help.  You'll get experience and some great references.
 
Take a look at overseas positions.  A lot of foreign companies want people who understand US business.  You'd get experience, a lot of countries are cheap to live in, you'll get experience, and maybe pick up an extra language or two.
 
Aug 9, 2010 at 2:28 PM Post #14 of 18

Kirosia

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^ Thanks, I just created accounts at Manpower and Kelly. (Sadly, not many openings for my credentials) 
 
Not sure If I wanna be a substitute teacher and I'm too scared/uncomfortable to go overseas. Plus the lack of business experience...
 
Aug 13, 2010 at 3:45 PM Post #15 of 18

sebastian589

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Temp agencies will likely be a good start. I graduated this spring and worked a handful of short term positions that allowed me to pay the bills until I found something else. There are also some more business/corporate-centered temp agencies such as Mergis group, Robert Half/Accountemps that you should apply to if they are in your area (I believe Mergis and Accountemps are in MA). I ended up finding a job on my own, but both Mergis and Accountempts later contacted me with Temp-to-hire positions that were pretty attractive.
 
If you go the temp route and find something make sure you work your tail off and make as many contacts as possible. I had a three day temp job early this summer doing some mindless tasks for a company while they focused on their upcoming move, it stunk and was boring but I worked diligently and introduced myself to as many people as I could the first day. Two months later I got a call from the manager I was working under about a job opportunity, handshakes and smiles can open a lot of doors. With the job market as competitive as it is, every contact you make could prove the difference. 
 
Most of all be open to whatever opportunities arise, seems like you are taking that approach and you are wise to do so. Two close friends, one in Borneo and one in South Africa, are working jobs that were only offered to them because other candidates turned the offers down. Both are loving their situations and building their professional resumes.
 
I know I already said "most of all" but most-most of all don't get discouraged or take setbacks personally. The market is brutal these days, there are many more diplomas being handed out this year than there are jobs and thats not your fault. Don't fault yourself for the poor job market, at the same time don't enable the poor job market to become an excuse for your unemployment. Only people looking and working hard to find jobs are finding them these days (you are obviously taking the right steps), with a little luck and some hard work you'll find something.
 

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