Musical Fidelity V-Can?
Nov 18, 2008 at 1:18 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 6

Solitary1

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Nov 18, 2008 at 1:30 AM Post #2 of 6

atbglenn

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Audio Advisor sells it for $199

Musical Fidelity - V-CAN - Headphone Amplifier-Audio Advisor

Genuine State-of-the-art Headphone Amp

Don't be fooled by its plain vanilla chassis. The unassuming-appearing Musical Fidelity V-CAN is a genuine state-of-the-art headphone amplifier.

Most high quality headphones have impedance of around 30 Ohms. Yet almost all headphone amps have an output impedance between 50 and 100 ohms. Because of their high output impedance, these other amps cannot drive headphones properly. Any sound they produce through the headphones is necessarily colored by distortion and nonlinear frequency response.

The V-CAN is quite different. Its output impedance is 5 ohms. This means it will drive any headphone available with ease. It will produce low distortion, ruler flat frequency response, and complete linearity.
V-Series Components

The V-LPS is part of Musical Fidelity's V-Series of components. The V-Series is a new, ultra-value, super-performance series, which offers incredible value for money. As a result of careful engineering, the V-Series has state-of-the-art, no compromise circuitry housed in a nicely finished but modest package.

Typically, the V-Series has 60% to 70% of its cost in electronics. The quantity and quality of components in any of the V-Series is pretty well identical to those from high-end components costing ten times (or more) the price. The difference is that the V-Series is housed in nicely finished, economical metalwork as opposed to the kind of chassis that Musical Fidelity calls "bloated high-end excess."

* Power: 0.25W /channel into 32 ohms
* Output impedance 5 ohms
* Total harmonic distortion: <0.005% typical. 20 Hz-20 kHz Signal / noise ratio: >109 dB 'A' weighted
* Input impedance: 25 K ohm
* Frequency response: +0, -1 dB. 20 Hz to 80 kHz
* Power requirement: 12V DC 500 mA
* Power input 1.3mm DC power jack
* Dimensions: 7" long (including terminals and volume), 3-3/4" wide, 1-2⁄3" high (including 'feet')
* Weight: 12-1/4 oz.
 
Nov 18, 2008 at 1:45 AM Post #3 of 6

FallenAngel

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That claim about headphone amp output impedance is pretty funny and completely discredits the company in my eyes. Give me a break, almost all solid-state and hybrid headphone amps have an output impedance below 2R and tube are usually matched to the headphones.

And "most" high quality headphones aren't 30R, Grado and Denon are, most aren't.
 
Apr 14, 2009 at 9:22 PM Post #4 of 6

kenratboy

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Quote:

Originally Posted by FallenAngel /img/forum/go_quote.gif
That claim about headphone amp output impedance is pretty funny and completely discredits the company in my eyes. Give me a break, almost all solid-state and hybrid headphone amps have an output impedance below 2R and tube are usually matched to the headphones.

And "most" high quality headphones aren't 30R, Grado and Denon are, most aren't.



According to the latest Stereophile, they are referring to the headphone amps built into amps, CD players, etc. - not REAL headphone amps.

My AH-D2000's are listed as 25 ohms.
 
Apr 15, 2009 at 1:14 PM Post #6 of 6

achristilaw

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My Brother-in-law picked one up and was not pleased with the result. It was quirky with low impedance phones in particular. And what was most annoying for him is that the volume couldn't be matched at even moderate volumes because one channel picked up before the other. The problem evaporated at higher volumes however and the channels would match.

Audio Advisor sent another thinking manufacturer defect....no defect that is the way of the design. Input impedance, one possible problem I'm thinking.....
 

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