monitor headphones?
Apr 8, 2010 at 11:40 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 33

whateverman

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Hello all
smily_headphones1.gif


A friend of mine is taking a Studio Sound class means he's working on Cubase and learning music production and etc.
His teacher asked the students in his class to get "Monitor Headphones", which supposed to produce more reflective sound than regular headphones (?)..

I told him right away I have to ask the best in order to get an answer.

Is Monitor Headphones a real thing?
What's the difference between monitor headphones and regular headphones?
And can you give me an example of monitor headphones?

Thanks in advanced
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Apr 8, 2010 at 12:14 PM Post #3 of 33

stang

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Lol. Yes there is a massive difference between monitoring headphones and regular headphones. Regular headphones 'generally' try to make your music sound good. Monitoring headphones should be as neutral as possible and and be detailed to show how good the recording is and how it was INTENDED to sound etc. K701 is good if you want an open headphone. I would imagine AKG K271 would also be a good choice.
 
Apr 8, 2010 at 12:23 PM Post #5 of 33

stang

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Except they are open and the OP's friend will probably need closed.
 
Apr 8, 2010 at 12:25 PM Post #6 of 33

kunalraiker

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Quote:

Originally Posted by stang /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Except they are open and the OP's friend will probably need closed.


Then I would recommend semi-open ones as the DT 990 600ohm
 
Apr 8, 2010 at 12:26 PM Post #7 of 33

stang

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Except they are not neutral
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The DT880 would be a better pick, but I still reckon something like the K240 or K271 would be better. I am not too good with monitoring cans, except I know they should be as neutral as possible and closed is sometimes better in some instances.
 
Apr 8, 2010 at 4:21 PM Post #8 of 33

lejaz

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The old akg k240/141 is a classic studio headphone, but he may need closed...k271 is supposed to be very neutral. The m50 is less money and may do the trick nicely.
 
Apr 8, 2010 at 6:59 PM Post #11 of 33

Soaa-

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The K 240 DF are very neutral. They were actually designed for studio monitoring use, but they do leak sound. They're good for mixing and mastering, but not for recording.
 
Apr 9, 2010 at 7:08 AM Post #13 of 33

Drubbing

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Unless the audio class provides decent sources and powerful amps, then why suggest the usual suspects/FOTY phones? And open/semi open at that.

Beyer DT250. They actually designed for studio monitoring, are closed and easy to drive.
 
Apr 9, 2010 at 8:12 AM Post #15 of 33

captian73

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IMHO, although there are headphones that badge themselves as 'Monitor' you have to understand that every audio company put 'their' spin on how the sound should be and so for me it's a bit of a non question.

As monitor headphones, I was taught by people here that bass is not necessary and so greatly reduced to allow the rest of the frequency range to come through. People speak about 'flat response' etc, but I found that monitor headphones generally have a dip in bass and some form of elevated midrange.

I've had a go on my friends Shure SRH 880's, which were good. My friend is taking a sound engineering course at uni.

Quote:

Originally Posted by stang /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Lol. Yes there is a massive difference between monitoring headphones and regular headphones.


I agree. choosing monitor headphones over commercial headphones like Sennheiser, or DJ headphones, and you're going to get a different type of sound, but with each company wanting your hard earned cash and claiming that the sound their products produce is the 'purest' or the "most correct' by using space age materials, just confuses the issue.

AKG seems to be a company born out of the studio, Shure are are heavily into monitoring. so either of those two company's would be a good place to start i guess.
 

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